Hospitality & Tourism Management Program

  • PSLO
  • Data Sheet
  • Program Review
  • Assessment Report

Program Student Learning Outcomes Assessment
(AY 2018-2019)

Program Student Learning Outcomes(PSLOs)

At the completion of the Hospitality & Tourism Management Program, the student will be able to:

  1. Explain the interdependent components of the international hospitality and tourism industry including transportation, customer service, food service, lodging, recreation management, roles of national and state visitors’ authorities, marketing and sales.
  2. Demonstrate professional lodging specific technical skills, supervisory techniques and management skills.
  3. Explain the types and elements of food service operations.
  4. Demonstrate front of the house technical and supervision techniques.
  5. Describe tourism attraction support services and related business opportunities.
  6. Describe the importance of developing the FSM as a sustainable tourism destination.
  7. Communicate in basic Japanese for lodging, food service and tourism provider guest services.

PSLO Assessment Report Summary

What we looked at:

PSLO #6- Describe the importance of developing the FSM as a sustainable tourism destination;Focusing our assessments on students’ writing and math skills in course HTM110-Intoduction to Hospitality and Tourism Management HTM120-Intoduction to World Tourism, HTM165-Food Fundamentals and Basic Cookery, HTM220-Food and Beverage Management, HTM230-Hospitality Marketing and; and their math skills in courses HTM150-Hospitality Supervision, HTM170-Front Office Management, and HTM250-Facilities Management & Practicum (Capstone Course).

What we found:

  • HTM110- 22 (16 females and 6 males) out of 23 students or (96%) successfully completed this PSLO as measured by group and class discussions, quizzes, class works and research assignments in Fall 2018.
  • HTM120- 15 (12 females; 3 males) out of 17 students (88%) successfully completed this PSLO as measured by group research and class discussions and quizzes in Spring 2019.
  • HTM165- *90% or 9/10 students (9 females and 0 male) successfully completed this PSLO as measured by quiz, kitchen laboratory, research, food preparation and methods of cooking, food cost and selling price computation and final exam in Spring 2019.
    *100% or 9/9 students (8 females and 1 male) successfully completed this PSLO as measured by quiz, kitchen laboratory, research, food preparation and methods of cooking, food cost and selling price computation and final exam in Fall 2018.
  • HTM150- 14(12 females and 2 male) out of 15 students or (93%) successfully completed this PSLO as measured by group and class discussions, quizzes, oral group presentation, calculations of ARR, Occupancy percentage, RevPar and TrevPar and research assignment in Fall 2018.
  • HTM170-100% or 18/18 students achieved a rating of 70% or higher based on a classwork activity, performing video presentation for check-in and check-out in Spring 2019.
  • HTM220- *7(6 females and 1 male) out of 7 students (100%) successfully completed this PSLO as measured by group and class discussions, role playing, practical demonstration and actual food and beverage operations in BPC in Spring 2019.
    * 18(15 females and 3 male) out of 18 students (100%) successfully completed this PSLO as measured by group and class discussions, role playing, practical demonstration and actual food and beverage operations in BPC in Fall 2018.
  • HTM230- 20 (17 females; 3 males) out of 20 students (100%) successfully completed this PSLO as measured by group and class discussions, quizzes and midterm in Fall 2018.
  • HTM 250-100% 5(3 Females; 2 Males) out 5 students or 100% successfully completed this PSLO as measured through evaluations by site supervisors and as well as performing basic calculations such as food costing, menu planning, quantity cooking, food portioning, guest check calculation, and cashiering in Fall 2018
  • HTM250-100% 4 (4 Females) out of 4 students or 100% successfully completed this PSLO as measured through evaluations by site supervisors and as well as performing basic calculations such as food costing, menu planning, quantity cooking, food portioning, guest check calculation, and cashiering in Spring 2019.
  • HTM250- 100% 10 (10 Females, 0 male) out of 10 students or 100% successfully completed this PSLO as measured through evaluations by site supervisors and as well as performing basic calculations such as food costing, menu planning, quantity cooking, food portioning, guest check calculation, and cashiering in Summer 2019.

What are we planning to work on

  • Continue assessing all the program core courses focusing on the same criteria: writing and math skills;
  • Course modification of HTM220 into lecture/lab course; and
  • Finalizing PSLO modification request.

Recommendations for students:

  • Students are advised to successfully complete EN110, EN120, and at least MS099 by the first semester.
  • Students are advised to successfully complete AC131 prior to taking HTM150 or HTM170.

Program Review for AS degree in Hospitality & Tourism Management program

AP Full Official

Hospitality and Tourism Management (HTM) Program

Campus

Pohnpei

AP Review Submission Date

10/21/2016

Completed by

Debra W. Perman

AR Review Cycle

Fall 2013-Spring 2014; Fall 2014-Spring 2015; and Fall 2015-Spring 2016.

Program Mission and Goals

Program goals are broad statements concerning knowledge, skills, or values that the faculty members expect the graduating students to achieve.

Mission: The Hospitality and Tourism Management (HTM) AS degree program is committed to cultivating students with the fundamental concepts, knowledge, practices, and skills in hospitality and tourism for the pursuit of advanced degree(s) and/or for the purpose of employment or advancement in the industries of hospitality and/or tourism.

The primary goal of the HTM program is to provide students with the basic skills needed to succeed as supervisors, managers or business entrepreneurs in the food service, lodging, airline, travel provider, attraction, interpretation, and general tourism industries. The program aims to prepare students to become productive workers, owners and managers in the growing fields of hospitality and tourism within the FSM and internationally.

Program Student Learning Outcomes (PSLOs)

At the completion of theHospitality & Tourism Management Program, the student will be able to:

1. Explain the interdependent components of the international hospitality and tourism industry including transportation, customer service, food service, lodging, recreation management, roles of national and state visitors’ authorities, marketing and sales.?

2. Demonstrate professional lodging specific technical skills, supervisory techniques and management skills.

3. Explain the types and elements of food service operations.?

4. Demonstrate front of the house technical and supervision techniques.?

5. Describe tourism attraction support services and related business opportunities.

6. Describe the importance of developing the FSM as a sustainable tourism destination.

7. Communicate in basic Japanese for lodging, food service and tourism provider guest services.

Note: Below are the modified versions to be submitted for the Curriculum Committee’s review and endorsement .

PROPOSED

Program goals and description:

The primary goal of the HTM program is to provide students with the basic knowledge and skills needed to succeed as productive workers at the entry to mid-levels in the food service, lodging, airline, travel provider, attraction, and general hospitality and tourism industries; and to further education in pursuit of a higher degree in the same field or the like.

HTM Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs)

Upon completion of the program, the student will be able to:

1. Apply knowledge and skills of the basic requirements for the hospitality and tourism management program in the classroom and in the workplace.

2. Communicate effectively in the classroom, community, and industry.

3. Demonstrate industry-defined work ethics and competence, teamwork, and interpersonal skills.

Program History

This section describes the history of the program. This includes the date and reason of implementation, significant milestones in the development of the program, and significant current activities.

During the academic year 1996-1997, the program was developed and implemented to fulfill the need for qualified tourism providers as put forth by the FSM National and State governments. It officially started in the fall semester of 1998 as the Hotel Restaurant Management (HRM) program, focusing mainly on hospitality practices for hotels and restaurants. Eventually, it was modified to Hospitality and Tourism Management (HTM) program expanding the scope to include tourism. Key players of the program’s origin were former HTM Professor Howard Rice and then Campus Director Penny Weilbacher.

From the fall of 1998 to the spring of 2010, Howard Rice served as division chair for the program. To support the College’s efforts towards streamlining, the HTM division was reorganized in the summer of 2010 to merge with the Pohnpei campus Business and Computer divisions, which runs the Certificate of Achievement (COA) programs in Bookkeeping and Secretarial Science. The division has since been renamed the Hospitality and Tourism Management/Business (HTM/BU) Division and is currently chaired by Debra W. Perman.

Below are updates of the program since the last review cycle.

1. While undergoing and awaiting review of course modifications to HTM165 and HTM220 from lecture-based to lecture and lab, we went ahead and implemented a modified scheduling of these two classes to allow for ample hands on and practical applications. Originally, the classes were scheduled on Tuesdays and Thursdays, 1 hour and 55 minutes, but now are scheduled on Wednesday afternoons for 1-hour and Thursdays for 2 hours (10:30am to 12:30pm). This schedule coincides with Thursday brunch operation of the teaching restaurant, Blue Plate Café (BPC). Also, we were able to utilize Tuesdays for additional hands on activities, which eventually led to the establishment of the Tuesday Faculty Lounge Day from 9:00am to noon for campus faculty. Along with students enrolled in HTM165, and HTM220 classes and work-study students, interns in the HTM250 perform the roles of Assistant Managers, which allows them to fulfill their food services hours as required by the internship.

2. We have updated the PSLOs, program goals, and program description but still pending submission to the office of the Dean of Academic Programs (DAP) and Curriculum and Assessment Committee (CAC).

3. Courses updated, revised, and submitted to CAC for review and their statuses:

a. HTM110 Introduction to Hospitality and Tourism Management (Approved in fall 2014)

b. HTM250 Facilities Management and Practicum (Approved in fall 2015, revised title: HTM250 Internship)

c. FL120 Basic Japanese for Hospitality and Tourism (Still under review)

d. FL160 Situational Japanese for Hospitality and Tourism (Still under review)

4. HTM Advisory Council is currently at the preliminary stages with the Chair meeting with individual potential members of the business community. We anticipate formalizing the council by end of fall 2016.

5. Established the HTM By Product Account through the Business Office generating sales from the operation of the Blue Plate Café (BPC). Total sales from Fall 2013 to Spring 2016: $4,739.71.

6. Initiated job-shadowing activity by utilizing program work-study students and placing them in various offices and establishments.

7. From Fall 2013 to Summer 2016, twenty-five students successfully completed the program and graduated.

8. The proposed changes to the program description, goals, and learning outcomes better describes the actual outcome of each graduate who has successfully completed the program. Majority of the graduates have little to nearly no work experience outside of their program internship, thus the program’s initial goal of producing managers and supervisors has yet to be met. Based on the last two reviews, majority of graduates were hired into either entry to mid-level positions.

Program Description

The program description describes the program, including its organization, relationship to other programs in the system, program design, degree(s) offered, and other significant features of the program, such as elements/resources for forward-looking new program contributions to the state’s economy, or specialized program accreditation.

The HTM program is designed to enable students to become productive workers, owners and managers in the growing fields of hospitality and tourism within the FSM and internationally. The program provides students with the basic skills needed to succeed as supervisors, manager or business owners in the food service, lodging, airlines, travel provider and general tourism industries. Students will learn the importance of building a sustainable tourism economy in the Nation and abroad. They will have the opportunity to examine how the nation fits into the international travel system and the importance of providing top quality service as a foundation for developing a vibrant industry. Specific subject areas cover all aspects of the lodging, food service and travel industries.

Source: General Catalog 2015-2016 (page 47)

Program Admission Requirements

This section describes the requirements for admission into the program and other requisites.

Admissions Criteria: Applicants must meet the following admission requirements to be matriculated into a degree program:

1. Have graduated or will graduate from high school at the end of the current school year, or have a General Educational Development or GED certificate;

2. Have a minimum high school grade point average of 2.0 as measured on a 4.0 scale, or a minimal score of 35 on each section and an average score of 45 on all sections of the GED test; and

3. Be accepted by the Committee on Recruitment, Admissions and Retention.

Source: General Catalog, 2015-2016 (page 37)

Program Certificate/Degree Requirements

This section specifies the requirements for obtaining a certificate/degree in the program, including specific courses,, sequencing of courses, total credits, internships, practical, etc.

In addition to the COM-FSM general education core course (29 credits) requirements, students must successfully complete the following required major courses in order to graduate.

HTM Core Courses (24 credits)

HTM 110 Introduction to Hospitality and Tourism Management (3)

HTM 120 Introduction to World Tourism (3)

HTM 150 Hospitality Supervision (3)

HTM 165 Food Fundamentals and Quantity Cooking (3)

HTM 170 Front Office Management (3)

HTM 220 Food and Beverage Management (3)

HTM 230 Hospitality Marketing (3)

HTM 250 Facilities Management and Practicum (3).

Business Courses (7 credits)

BU101 Introduction to Business (3)

AC 13 Accounting I (4)

Humanities (Japanese Language) (6 credits)

FL120 Basic Japanese for HTM (3)

FL160 Situational Japanese for HTM (3)

Major Requirements: 37 credits

Open Elective: 3 credits

General Education Core Requirements: 29 credits

GRADUATION REQUIREMENT: 69 credits

Source: General Catalog 2015-2016 (page 48)

Program Courses and Enrollment

This section lists courses offered in the program, including number of sections, course enrollment, section fill rates, and redundancy of courses across the institution.

Courses

F13

Sp14

F14

Sp15

F15

Sp16

HTM 110

1:9/25:36%; 2:12/25:48%

*

1:19/25:76%

*

1:23/25:92%

*

HTM 120

*

1:22/25:88%

*

1:20/25:80%

*

1:19:76%

HTM 150

*

1:10/25:40%

1:13/25:52%

*

1:11/25: 44%

*

HTM 165

1:10/15:67%

1:15/15:100%

*

1:9/15:60%

*

*

HTM 170

1:13/25:52%

*

*

1:13/25:52:

*

1:9:36%

HTM 220

*

1:9/25:36%

1:11/25:44%

*

*

1:14:56%

HTM 230

*

1:12/25:48%

*

1:9/25:36%

*

*

HTM 250

1:4/5:80%

1:5/5:100%

1:2/5:40%

1:3/5:60%

*

1:4/5:80%

FL 120

1:22/25:88%

*

1:19/25:76%

*

1:17/25:68%

*

FL 160

1:16/25:64%

1:13/25:52%

*

1:20/25:80%

1:6/25:24%

1:10/25:40%

Figures per course show section, enrollment, and fill rate for each respective semester.

*Not offered.

Ø HTM165 Food Fundamentals and Quantity Cooking class can accommodate a maximum of 15 students due the nature of the course as well as the limited space of the teaching kitchen lab.

Ø HTM250 Internship class is the capstone course for the program with an historical enrollment no more than 5 per semester. Not included above are the summer semesters 2014, 2015, & 2016.

Source: COM-FSM Pohnpei Campus OAR and IRPO Data Sheets

Program Faculty

This section reports the faculty of the program, including full-time and part-time faculty. The degrees held and rank are provided for the full-time and part-time faculty. Finally, provide the faculty student ratio for the program.

Name

Degree

Rank

Status

Notes

Matthew Thiel

BS

Instructor

FT

AY15-16 only

Debra W. Perman

BBA, MBA

Professor & Div. Chair

FT

Joyce Roby

AS, BS

Instructor

FT

Gary Bloom

BA, BA, JD

Instructor

PT

Spring 2014(HTM120)

Akiko Kamikubo

MA

Instructor

PT

FL120 & FL160

Faculty/Student Ratio Per Academic Year

AY2013-2014

Average Enrollment:

AY2014-2015

Average Enrollment:

AY2015-2016

Average Enrollment:

115:3

89:3

115:4

29:1

30:1

29:1

Program Indicators

This section provides the data for analyzing the extent to which the program has achieved the established outcomes and criteria. This is the most important part of the program review. The data that will be collected and evaluated are the following:

1. Assessment of course student learning outcomes of program courses

Course Student Learning Outcomes (CSLOs ):

Data indicates percentage (%) of those who completed the course and successfully met each corresponding course CSLO per semester. Target rate was for 70% to achieve a passing rate of at least 70% or grade of C or better.

Fall 2013 Course Student Learning Outcomes (CSLOs)

CSLO#

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

HTM110

90

90

90

100

100

89

HTM 165

100

100

100

100

100

HTM 170

100

100

92

92

HTM 250

100

50

100

FL 120

68

68

FL 160

73

73

Fall 2013, target rate was unmet for both learning outcomes of FL120. Majority of assessment strategies used were oral recitations in Japanese language for hospitality settings at which 31% performed unsuccessfully. The improvement plan as recommended by the instructor included additional exercises throughout the course for practice. As for HTM250 and CSLO#2, of the 2 enrolled only one completed the required practicum hours as well as the course.

Spring 2014 Course Student Learning Outcomes (CSLOs)

CSLO#

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

HTM 120

74

84

84

84

84

HTM 165

85

100

100

100

85

HTM 150

89

89

67

100

HTM 220

89

89

89

89

89

89

HTM 230

82

82

82

HTM250

100

100

100

FL 160

83

91

Spring 2014, target rate was unmet for HTM150, CSLO#3 at which 3 out of 9 enrolled were not able to successfully demonstrate the application of hotel operations used in lodgings. The improvement plans included addressing the issue early on in the semester and conducting periodic follow ups.

Fall 2014 Course Student Learning Outcomes (CSLOs)

CSLO#

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

HTM110

100

82

82

HTM 150

100

77

77

77

HTM 220

80

100

100

100

100

100

HTM 250

50

50

50

FL 120

82

82

Fall 2014, all target rates were met for courses offered. However with the piloting of the modified scheduling of HTM165 and HTM220, low enrollment, and a shortage of an instructor, this was the semester we experienced the onset of non-sequencing of courses.

Spring 2015 Course Student Learning Outcomes (CSLOs)

CSLO#

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

HTM 120

90

80

85

100

100

HTM 165

78

78

78

78

78

HTM 170

75

75

75

75

HTM 230

82

82

82

HTM 250

75

75

75

FL 160

83

83

Spring 2015, a new instructor was hired and course sections were back in sequence with the exception of HTM220.

Spring 2016 Course Student Learning Outcomes (CSLOs)

CSLO#

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

HTM 120

100

74

100

89

HTM 170

100

100

100

100

HTM 220

100

100

100

100

HTM 250

75

75

100

FL 160

100

60

Fall 2015 Course Student Learning Outcomes (CSLOs)

CSLO#

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

HTM 110

100

87

87

HTM 150

90

90

90

90

FL120

94

76

FL160

66

100













Fall 2015, we experienced the lowest number of course offerings for the program as a result of the few who progressed or persisted from the last semester. In addition, the newly hired instructor abruptly left the program, leaving the program once again short of an instructor.

Source: Program Course Level Assessment reports; TractDat; IRPO

2. Assessment of program student learning outcomes

Program Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Report

Academic Year 2013-2014 (YR1)

Areas of Focus:

PSLOs #1 to #5 were assessed along with the following related courses for Fall 2013, Spring 2014, and Summer 2014:

  • HTM110- Introduction to Hospitality & Tourism Management

o Research assignment on hospitality and tourism service providers in Pohnpei state.

  • HTM120-Introduction to World Tourism

o Research assignments to identify the interdependent components of the international travel and tourism system identify and explain the economic, cultural and environmental impacts of tourism.

  • HTM165- Food Fundamentals & Quantity Cooking

o Students were evaluated on their performance in the operation of the teaching restaurant. A rubric was used to measure their performance in the back operations of a restaurant setting.

  • HTM220-Food & Beverage Management

o Students were evaluated on their performance in the operation of the teaching restaurant. A rubric was used to measure their performance in the front operations of a restaurant setting- checklist, customer surveys, and instructor's evaluation.

  • HTM250-Facilities Management & Practicum (Capstone Course)

o Students were evaluated on their performance in the operation of the teaching restaurant. A rubric was used to measure their performance in the all operations of a restaurant setting- checklist, customer surveys, and instructor's evaluation.

o Site supervisors evaluated the student’s performance upon completion of 50 practicum hours each in hotel lodgings, a restaurant setting, and travel or tourism agency.

Findings:

For each PSLO assessed, the success target was 70% with a passing rate of 70% or better.

  • PSLO#1: Explain the interdependent components of the international hospitality and tourism industry including transportation, customer service, food service, lodging, recreation management, roles of national and state visitors’ authorities, marketing and sales.

o HTM110 & HTM120- 95% or 37/38

o HTM 250-100% or 7/7

  • PSLO#2: Demonstrate professional lodging specific technical skills, supervisory techniques and management skills.

o HTM 250-Fall 2013, 50% or 1/2; Spring 2014 and Summer 2014, 100% or 9/9

  • PSLO#3: Explain the types and elements of food service operations.

o HTM165-Fall 2013, 88% or 7/8; Spring 2014, 100% or 13/13

o HTM220- 89% or 8/9

o HTM250-100% or 11/11

  • PSLO#4: Demonstrate front of the house technical and supervision techniques.

o HTM220-89% or 8/9

o HTM250-100% or 11/11

  • PSLO#5: Describe tourism attraction support services and related business opportunities.

o HTM110-95% or 18/19

o HTM120-74% or 14/19

o HTM250-100% or 11/11

Action Plan/Status:

Although the outcomes were met, we found that the following needed to be done given that the course modifications were still in review:

· Modified scheduling of classes HTM165 and HTM220 to allow for ample hands on and practical applications. Suggested scheduling 1hr Wednesday afternoons for lecture and 2 hrs. Thursdays 10:30am to 12:30pm for practical applications and also to coincide with Thursday lunch operation of Blue Plate Café (teaching restaurant).

Status: Coordinated with Campus IC and DAP, implemented in Spring 2014.

· Submitted modification request to increase practicum hours from 150 to 300 for more experience as recommended by students, instructor, and site supervisors.

Status: Course modification was submitted to CAC for review with status still pending.

· Planned to coordinate with Student Services for student tutorial assistance in writing and research skills.

Status: Tutorial services already in place, program instructors have included instructions in related course syllabi.

· Explored options for the Blue Plate Café to be set up as a student enterprise to create a venue for students to practice and apply skills necessary to operate as a fully functioning café. Proposed service offerings include daily breakfast and lunch openings on Tuesdays & Thursdays.

Status: Identified students attending classes HTM165, HTM220, or HTM250 along with division faculty, work-study students and HTM Club officers as those directly involved in the operation. Roles and responsibilities will be discussed. Target start: Fall 2014.

=================================================================

Academic Year 2014-2015 (YR2)

Areas of Focus:

All seven (7) PSLOs were assessed along with the following related courses for Fall 2014, Spring 2015, and Summer 2015:

  • HTM110- Introduction to Hospitality & Tourism Management ; HTM120-Introduction to World Tourism; HTM150-Hospitality Supervision; HTM165- Food Fundamentals & Quantity Cooking; HTM170-Front Office Management; HTM220-Food & Beverage Management; HTM250- Facilities Management & Practicum (Capstone Course); FL120- Basic Japanese for Hospitality and Tourism; FL160- Situational Japanese for Hospitality and Tourism

Findings:

PSLO#1:

o HTM110- Research assignment on hospitality and tourism service providers in Pohnpei state; 100% or 13/13 achieved 75% or better; Fall 2014. [TARGET: 70%]

o HTM120- Research assignment to identify the interdependent components of the international travel and tourism system identify and explain the economic, cultural and environmental impacts of tourism; 90% or 18/20 achieved 70% or better; Spring 2015. [TARGET: 70%]

o HTM 250- Practicum student performance evaluation at work site for food services, lodgings, and tourism/travel. Student produced a brief summary of work experience in correspondence to time sheets and supervisor's evaluation form; Fall 2014 (1/1) incomplete hours; 100% achieved 80% or better- Spring 2015 (3/3); Summer 2015 (4/4). [TARGET: 100% to achieve 80% or better]

PSLO#2:

o HTM 250- Practicum student performance evaluation at work site for lodging skills. Student produced a brief summary of work experience in correspondence to time sheets and supervisor's evaluation form; Fall 2014 (1/1) incomplete hours; 100% achieved 80% or better-Spring 2015 (3/3); Summer 2015 (4/4). [TARGET: 100% to achieve 70% or better]

o Participating service providers included Cliff Rainbow Hotel, 7Stars Inn, Sea Breeze Hotel, Yvonne’s Hotel, and Mangrove Bay Hotel.

  • PSLO#3:

o HTM165- Students were evaluated on their performance in the operation of the teaching restaurant. A rubric was used to measure their performance in the back operations of a restaurant setting; Spring 2015 78% (7/9) achieved 70% or better. [TARGET: 70%]

o HTM220- Students were evaluated on their performance in the operation of the teaching restaurant. A rubric was used to measure their performance in the front operations of a restaurant setting- checklist, customer surveys, and instructor's evaluation; Fall 2014 100% (10/10) achieved 70% or better. [TARGET: 70%]

o HTM250- Students were evaluated on their performance in the operation of the teaching restaurant and/or an actual restaurant or food services facility. A rubric was used to measure their performance in the all operations of a restaurant setting- checklist, customer surveys, and instructor/supervisor’s evaluation; Fall 2014 (1/1) achieved 70% or better; 100% achieved 80% or better- Spring 2015 (3/3); Summer 2015 (4/4). [TARGET: 100% to achieve 70% or better]

o Participating service providers included Cliff Rainbow Restaurant, Kia’s Restaurant, Riverside Restaurant, Sea Breeze Restaurant, A-One Restaurant, Cupid’s Bar & Grill, and Mangrove Bay Bar & Grill.

  • PSLO#4:

o HTM220- Students were evaluated on their performance in the operation of the teaching restaurant. A rubric was used to measure their performance in the front operations of a restaurant setting- checklist, customer surveys, and instructor's evaluation. In Fall 2014 for supervisory techniques, 80% or 8/10 achieved 70% or better; for technical techniques, 100% or 10/10 achieved 70% or better. [TARGET: 70%]

o HTM250- Site supervisors evaluated the student’s performance upon completion of 300 practicum hours, 100 hours each in hotel lodgings, a restaurant setting, and travel or tourism agency; 100% achieved 80% or better-Fall 2014 (1/1); Spring 2015 (3/3); Summer 2015 (4/4). [TARGET: 70%]

o Participating service providers included Cliff Rainbow Hotel, 7Starr Inn, Yvonne’s Hotel, Sea Breeze Hotel, Mangrove Bay Hotel, Pohnpei Tourism Office, and United Airlines.

  • PSLO#5:

o HTM120- Research assignment to identify the interdependent components of the international travel and tourism system identify and explain the economic, cultural and environmental impacts of tourism; Spring 2015, 75% achieved 70% or better. [TARGET: 70%]

  • PSLO#6:

o HTM110- A brief essay quiz identifying and describing the role of international hospitality and tourism organizations, bureaus, and authorities; Fall 2014, 82% achieved 70% or better. [TARGET: 70%]

o HTM120- A brief essay exam identifying and describing the role of international hospitality and tourism organizations, bureaus, and authorities; Spring 2015, 100% achieved 70% or better. [TARGET: 70%]

o HTM150- A brief presentation on research findings on sustainable development of the lodging industry in the FSM, the current status in each state, the sustainable lodging development options for the immediate community; Fall 2014, 77% achieved 70% or better. [TARGET: 70%]

  • PSLO#7:

o FL120-

Ø Written and oral quiz to measure listening skills and comprehension of basic words and phrases for lodging and food service in a local hotel and teaching restaurant; Fall 2014, 72.2% (13/18) achieved 70% or better; Spring 2015, 58% (7/12) achieved 70% or better. [TARGET: 70%]

Ø Written exam measuring listening skills and word and phrase comprehension; Fall 2014 61.1% (11/18); Spring 2015, 58% (7/12) achieved 70% or better. [TARGET: 70%]

Ø Students practiced conversation in Japanese including greetings and other expressions necessary to serve customers; Fall 2014 61.1% (11/18) achieved 70% or better. [TARGET: 70%]

o FL160- Demonstration tests including taking customer reservations, orders, and presenting customer checks in a restaurant setting; welcoming guests, check in/out, etc. in a hotel setting. NOT ASSESSED, COURSE NOT OFFERED DUE TO LOW ENROLLMENT.

Action Plan/Status:

· Updated the number and contents of the PSLOs.

Status: Modified and reduced PSLOs from 7 to 3, pending submission to DAP and CAC for review.

· Modified HTM 165 and HTM220 courses from lecture based to lecture and lab.

Status: Modified course outlines, pending submission to DAP and CAC for review.

· Finalized FL120 and FL160 course modifications.

Status: Modified course outlines and submitted to CAC for review.

· Modified HTM250 course outline to reflect increase in practicum hours from 150 to 300 or more as recommended by service providers.

Status: Modified course outline, submitted to CAC, and was approved for only 144 internship hours as prescribed by the College’s course approved structure/format.

· Coordinated with the HTM Club to assist in the operation of the Blue Plate Café.

Status: Club officers have been actively involved.

· Commenced preliminary plans to establish the HTM Advisory Council.

Status: A list of potential members from the hotel, restaurant, travel, tourism, and other business community have been compiled and currently the Division Chair has been meeting with them individually on an informal basis with hopes of formalizing a committed group.

· Explored options to incorporate student job shadowing in core courses HTM120, HTM150, HTM165, HTM170, and HTM220 for students to gain and build work experience towards the capstone course, HTM250.

Status: Still pending due to inadequate resources to coordinate. Will continue on to next academic year.

Academic Year 2015-2016 (YR3)

Areas of Focus:

PSLOs 1, 2, & 3 focusing assessments on students’ writing and math skills in the following courses:

  • HTM110- Introduction to Hospitality & Tourism Management ; HTM120-Introduction to World Tourism; HTM150-Hospitality Supervision; HTM165- Food Fundamentals & Quantity Cooking; HTM170-Front Office Management; HTM220-Food & Beverage Management; HTM250 Internship (Capstone Course).

Findings:

PSLO#1: [TARGET: 70% to achieve a good rating (70-79%) or better.]

o HTM110- Written essay assignment on the student’s perspective on tourism development and the cultural and environmental impacts in the FSM, 87% or 20/23 achieved a rating of ‘good’ (70-79%) or ‘satisfactory’ (80-89%). Fall 2015.

o HTM120- Written assignment explaining how the food service industry is part of the component that interrelates to the improvement to the FSM tourism sector, 100% or 19/19 achieved a rating of ‘good’ (70-79%), ‘satisfactory’ (80-89%), or exemplary (90-100%). Spring 2016.

o HTM150-Written assignment showing how interdependence is acknowledged, managed, and utilized in the operations of the multifunction lodging facility, 91% or 10/11 achieved a rating of ‘good’ (70-79%) or ‘satisfactory’ (80-89%). Fall 2015.

o HTM 250-Written report of the functions or duties performed in the different departments at the student’s work-sites including hotel/lodgings, restaurant/food services, and travel/tourism agencies, 100% or 2/2 received an unsatisfactory rating due to incompletion in Fall 2015; 100% or 4/4 achieved a rating of ‘satisfactory’ (80-89%) in Spring 2016. [TARGET: 100% to achieve at least satisfactory (80-89%) rating.]

PSLO#2:

o Review a case study on the application of yield management in the lodging industries. HTM 150 (Fall 2015)-100% or 11/11 achieved a score of 35/50 (70%) or better. [TARGET: 70% to achieve 70% or better.]

o Demonstration exercise on calculation of guest accommodation charges, receipt of payments, and reconciling the accounts receivables. [TARGET: 70% to achieve at least 70% accuracy.]

Ø HTM150 (Fall 2015)- 91% or 10/11 achieved at least 70% accuracy in calculations.

Ø HTM170 (Spring2016) 100% or 9/9 achieved at least 70% accuracy in calculations.

o Case scenario activities to perform the night audit functions. [TARGET: 60% to achieve at least a good rating (70-79%).]

Ø HTM150 (Fall 2015)- 91% or 10/11 achieved a rating of ‘good’ (70-79%) or ‘satisfactory’ (80-89%).

Ø HTM170 (Spring 2016)- 100% or 9/9 achieved a rating of ‘good’ (70-79%) or ‘satisfactory’ (80-89%).

PSLO#3:

o Demonstration of learned knowledge on basic culinary techniques and skills in a full service public teaching restaurant setting; including food costing, menu planning, quantity cooking, portioning, guest check calculating, and cashiering.

Ø HTM150 (Fall 2015)- for food costing only: 91% or 10/11 achieved a rating of ‘good’ (70-79%) or ‘satisfactory’ (80-89%). [TARGET: 60% to achieve a rating of good (70-79%) or better.]

Ø HTM220 (Spring 2016)-100% or 13/13 achieved a rating of ‘good’ (70-79%), ‘satisfactory’ (80-89%), or ‘exemplary’ (90-100%). [TARGET: 60% to achieve a rating of good (70-79%) or better.]

Ø HTM250 (Spring 2016)-100% or 4/4 achieved a rating of ‘satisfactory’ (80-89%) or ‘exemplary’ (90-100%). [TARGET: 100% to achieve a rating of good (70-79%) or better.]

o Laboratory exercises demonstrating proper food handling safety with regards to storage and cooking temperatures; and illustrating the common standard meat cuts, poultry cuts, and seafood portioning standards.

Ø HTM250 (Spring 2016)-100% or 4/4 achieved a rating of ‘satisfactory’ (80-89%) or ‘exemplary’ (90-100%). [TARGET: 100% to achieve a rating of good (70-79%) or better.]

Action Plan/Status:

· Increased target ratings to achieve 100% accuracy for calculation activities dealing with cashiering, guest accommodation charges, receipt of payments, and reconciling the accounts receivables through more practical applications in courses HTM150, HTM170, HTM220 and HTM250. Repeat the same assessment for the coming year.

Status: Course modifications for HTM150 and HTM170 to have more hands on or real-life case scenarios in progress; with the lack of a suitable space for a lodging setting on campus, we will be coordinating with local hotel establishments for students’ site visits.

3. Program enrollment (historical enrollment patterns, student credits by major)

Term

F13

Sp14

F14

Sp15

F15

Sp16

Total (3yrs)

Total Enrollment

55

50

46

43

63

52

259

Total Credits

656

562

506

472

698

594

3488

The program experienced low enrollment in AY14/15 and increased in the fall 2015.

4. Average class size

Term

F13

Sp14

F14

Sp15

F15

Sp16

Avg Class Size

9.4

12.3

12.8

10.8

11.4

11.6

5. Course completion rate (%)

Term

F13

Sp14

F14

Sp15

F15

Sp16

Major

72

74.7

69

73.6

71.7

76.8

Program

66.3

75.6

76.6

77

80.6

81.7

Rates are based on ABC or Passing grades.

6. Student persistence rate (semester to semester)






New FT Fall 2013

Persisted Spring 2014

Retained Fall 2014

Persistence Spring 2014

Retention Fall 2014

8

5

8

62.5%

100.0%






New FT Fall 2014

Persisted Spring 2015

Retained Fall 2015

Persistence Spring 2015

Retention Fall 2015

8

10

7

125.0%

87.5%






New FT Fall 2015

Persisted Spring 2016

Retained Fall 2016

Persistence Spring 2016

Retention Fall 2016

5

4

n/a

80.0%

0.0%

Persistence rate is based on a cohort of 8 students who enrolled in Fall 2013.

7. Student retention rate (Fall-to-Fall for two-year programs; Fall-to-Spring for one-year programs)







New FT Fall 2013

Retained Fall 2014

Retention Fall 2014

8

8

100.0%




New FT Fall 2014

Retained Fall 2015

Retention Fall 2015

8

7

87.5%




New FT Fall 2015

Retained Fall 2016

Retention Fall 2016

5

n/a

0.0%

Retention rate is based on a cohort of students who enrolled in each fall semester.

8. Success rates on licensing or certification exams

None

9. Graduation rate based on yearly number

The number of HTM graduates per academic year, including summers, totaling 25.

AY13/14

AY14/15

AY15/16

11

8

6

2013_3

2014_1

2014_2

2014_3

2015_1

2015_2

2015_3

2016_1

2016_2

3

6

2

3

3

2

1

4

1

The table below shows graduates that were tracked from their first semester of enrollment from Spring 2011 to Fall 2014 and the number of semesters they completed the program in terms of the following:

o 100% = 4 semesters or 2 years.

o 150% = 6 semesters or 3 years.

o 200% = 8 semesters or 4 years.

Cohort

New FT Students

100%

150%

200%

F2011

16

-

6.25%

6.25%

F2012

9

-

-

-

F2013

8

-

-

-

The table below provides the individual graduate, semester enrolled, semester graduated, and rate:

Graduate

Enrolled

Graduated

% (# of Semesters)

1

Alten, Kerman

Fall 1997

Fall 2013

*Returning

2

Helgenberger, Megan

Sp2011

Fall 2013

150 (6)

3

Ramei, Janet

Sp2010

Fall 2013

200 (8)

4

Barnabas, Sira

Fall 2010

Sp2014

200 (8)

5

Edgar, Amy

Fall 2010

Sp2014

200 (8)

6

Kiluwe, Sharon

Sp2011

Sp2014

>150 (7)

7

Pelep, Rhonda

Fall 2010

Sp2014

200 (8)

8

Penias, Ivy Gean

Sum 2010

Sp2014

200 (8)

9

Waltu, Elmihra

Sp2012

Sp2014

100

10

Cholymay, Risenta

Fall 2012

Sum 2014

100 (4)

11

Yinug, Brandy Marie

Sp2013

Sum 2014

<100 (3)

12

Fermill, Amanda

Fall 2011

Fall 2014

>150 (7)

13

Hadley, Viola

Sp2010

Fall 2014

>200 (10)

14

Mauricio, Shallane

Sum 2012

Fall 2014

<150 (5)

15

Materne, Sophia

Fall 2011

Sp2015

200 (8)

16

Etse, Merna May

Sp2012

Sp2015

<200 (7)

17

Edwin, Reavy Shane

Sp2012

Sp2015

<200 (7)

18

Bonapart, Floriano

Sum 2013

Fall 2015

<150 (5)

19

Cantero, Reony-Jean

Sp2013

Fall 2015

150 (6)

20

Ligorio, Merlinda

Fall 2012

Fall 2015

<200 (7)

21

Edward, Leslie

Sum 2013

Sp2016

<200 (7)

22

Freeman, Cheryl Ann

Fall 2011

Sp2016

>200 (10)

23

Kerman, Marmoleen

Sum 2012

Sp2016

200 (8)

24

Remoket, Jasmine

Fall 2014

Sp2016

100 (4)

25

Gooliyan, Susan

Sum 2016

*Returning

Sources: Program Data Sheet HTM, IRPO and PC OAR.

10. Students seat cost

Based on the tuition rate of $135/credit, total seat cost for major course requirements is $4,050. The table below shows the breakdown.

Major Courses

Cr

Rate

Seat Cost

HTM110

3

$ 135

$405

HTM120

3

$ 135

$405

HTM150

3

$ 135

$405

HTM165

3

$ 135

$405

HTM170

3

$ 135

$405

HTM220

3

$ 135

$405

HTM230

3

$ 135

$405

HTM250

3

$ 135

$405

FL120

3

$ 135

$405

FL160

3

$ 135

$405

TOTAL

30

$135

$4,050

11. Revenue Generated by the Program

Revenue Sources: Tuition, enrollment fees, lab fees for HTM165 & 220 classes and Blue Plate Café (BPC) sales (teaching restaurant).

Source

Rate

13/14

14/15

15/16

Total Revenue

Tuition Fee

$135/cr

669

506

1298

$333,855

Enrollment Fees

$50

168

138

116

$21,100

Technology Fee

$100

168

138

116

$42,200

HTM Lab Fee

$25

10

24

23

$1,425

Graduation Fee

$36.50

11

5

6

$803

BPC Sales

-

$1,191.44

$1,663.25

$1,885.02

$4,739.71

Cost of Ownership Fee

PT $70

-

-

40

$2,800

FT $200

-

-

76

$15,200

TOTAL

$422,122.71

12. Cost of duplicate or redundant courses, program, or services.

NONE

13. Students’ satisfaction rate

N = 12 SA=Strongly Agree; A=Agree; D=Disagree; SD=Strongly Disagree

Answer Options

SA

A

D

SD

1. Internships or practical experiences are provided in the HTM program

5

5

2

2. Faculty are fair and unbiased

1

10

1

3. Classes are scheduled at times that are convenient

3

6

3

4. Faculty provide timely feedback about student

2

9

1

5. Nearly all classes deal with practical experiences

1

9

2

Source: HTM Internship Exit Surveys

14. Alumni data and Employment data and employer feedback (employer survey)

Graduate

Graduated

Status

1

Alten, Kerman

Fall 2013

Social Security Aministration (Pohnpei), Admin. Asst

2

Helgenberger, Megan

Fall 2013

Isamu Nakasone Store, Cashier

3

Ramei, Janet

Fall 2013

No data

4

Barnabas, Sira

Sp2014

Unemployed, housewife

5

Edgar, Amy

Sp2014

No data

6

Kiluwe, Sharon

Sp2014

Hospitality Industry, USA

7

Pelep, Rhonda

Sp2014

Pohnpei Ace Hardware, Cashier

8

Penias, Ivy Gean

Sp2014

Moved to USA

9

Waltu, Elmihra

Sp2014

Self employed

10

Cholymay, Risenta

Sum 2014

In school, UOG

11

Yinug, Brandy Marie

Sum 2014

In school, USA

12

Fermill, Amanda

Fall 2014

Unemployed

13

Hadley, Viola

Fall 2014

No data

14

Mauricio, Shallane

Fall 2014

Maui Resort, HI

15

Materne, Sophia

Sp2015

COM-FSM Bookstore, Clerk

16

Etse, Merna May

Sp2015

In school, UH Hilo

17

Edwin, Reavy Shane

Sp2015

FSM Public Auditor, Administration Asst.

18

Bonapart, Floriano

Fall 2015

In school, UOG

19

Cantero, Reony-Jean

Fall 2015

Mangrove Bay Sushi Bar, Wait-staff

20

Ligorio, Merlinda

Fall 2015

Pohnpei Tourism Volunteer

21

Edward, Leslie

Sp2016

In school, China Scholarship

22

Freeman, Cheryl Ann

Sp2016

Etscheit’s Ent., Cashier

23

Kerman, Marmoleen

Sp2016

Unemployed

24

Remoket, Jasmine

Sp2016

Unemployed

25

Gooliyan, Susan

Sum 2016

Unemployed

15. Program added or cancelled at nearby regional institutions (PCC, GCC, Hawaii schools, UOG, CMI, NMC)

*No changes since the last review.

Institution

Program

Degree

Certificates

Palau Community College

Tourism & Hospitality

AAS

Kapiolani Community College

1. Hospitality

2. Tourism & Travel

3. Culinary Arts

AS

AS

AS

COA, COC, & CC

Guam Community College

1. Culinary Arts

2. Hotel Operations

3. Food & Beverage Management

4. Travel & Tourism

AA

AS

AS

AS

Northern Marianas College

Hospitality & Tourism

AS

BS pending

University of Guam

Business Administration (International Tourism & Hospitality Mgt)

BBA

University of Hawaii-Manoa

Travel Industry Mgt

BS

16. Transfer rate

AY

Total graduates

Working

In school

No Information

2013/2014

11

55%

18%

27%

2014/2015

8

50%

25%

25%

2015/2016

6

42%

29%

29%

Analysis

Findings

This section provides discussion of information discovered as a result of the evaluation such as problems or concerns with the program and what part of the program is working well and meeting expectation.

Generally, the program is meeting its learning outcomes and instructors are delivering accordingly for students to meet each course student learning outcome.

The program has managed to improve its relations with service providers to host interns or students in the HTM250 course, allowing them to fulfill their lodging, restaurant, and travel/tourism hours. The remaining concern is the drop in the intern hours from the proposed 300 to 144 (as approved). The program will be looking into ways to improve in this area.

There is a need for the program faculty to be trained in course outline and program modification procedures/processes to keep the program updated and accomplish its tasks as indicated in the past three years’ action plans. Unaccomplished tasks were mainly due to limited resources (personnel), in between each of the three years. Other areas of concern involving the activities and findings of the past three years are as follows:

1. The need to increase enrollment and yet maintain quality instruction;

2. The need for adequate teaching facilities for the hotel and lodgings component of the learning outcomes;

3. The need for upgrading of the teaching facility for food services; and

4. The need for an improved tracking system of graduates/alumni.

Recommendations

This section provides recommendations from the program on what to do to improve or enhance the quality of program and course learning outcomes as well as program goals and objectives. This section should also include suggestions that describe how the program might be able to create opportunities for a better program in the future. Some examples are exploring alternate delivery mechanisms, forming external partnerships, or realigning with other programs.

Currently, faculty in the program is being utilized to teach other non-HTM courses, notably COA courses in BK and SS programs thus limiting their time and ability to enhance their respective HTM courses and the program. It is the recommendation of the program to assign only HTM related courses to each faculty to allow for focused concentration in enhancing the program and its courses.








Unit Assessment Report

Report Period: 2013-2014

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