Hospitality & Tourism Management Program

  • PSLO
  • Data Sheet
  • Program Review
  • Assessment Report

Program Student Learning Outcomes Assessment
(AY 2015-2016)

Program Student Learning Outcomes(PSLOs)

At the completion of the Hospitality & Tourism Management Program, the student will be able to:

  1. Explain the interdependent components of the international hospitality and tourism industry including transportation, customer service, food service, lodging, recreation management, roles of national and state visitors’ authorities, marketing and sales.
  2. Demonstrate professional lodging specific technical skills, supervisory techniques and management skills.
  3. Explain the types and elements of food service operations.
  4. Demonstrate front of the house technical and supervision techniques.
  5. Describe tourism attraction support services and related business opportunities.
  6. Describe the importance of developing the FSM as a sustainable tourism destination.
  7. Communicate in basic Japanese for lodging, food service and tourism provider guest services.

PSLO Assessment Report Summary

What we looked at:

PSLOs 1, 2, & 3 focusing our assessments on students’ writing and math skills in the following courses:

  • HTM110-Introduction to Hospitality & Tourism Management; HTM120-Introduction to World Tourism; HTM150-Hospitality Supervision; HTM165-Food Fundamentals & Quantity Cooking; HTM170-Front Office Management; HTM220-Food & Beverage Management;HTM250-Facilities Management & Practicum (Capstone Course).

What we found:

PSLO#1: [TARGET: 70% to achieve a good rating (70-79%) or better.]

  • HTM110- Written essay assignment on the student’s perspective on tourism development and the cultural and environmental impacts in the FSM, 87% or 20/23 achieved a rating of ‘good’ (70-79%) or ‘satisfactory’ (80-89%). Fall 2015.

  • HTM120- Written assignment explaining how the food service industry is part of the component that interrelates to the improvement to the FSM tourism sector, 100% or 19/19 achieved a rating of ‘good’ (70-79%), ‘satisfactory’ (80-89%), or exemplary (90-100%). Spring 2016.

  • HTM150-Written assignment showing how interdependence is acknowledged, managed, and utilized in the operations of the multifunction lodging facility, 91% or 10/11 achieved a rating of ‘good’ (70-79%) or ‘satisfactory’ (80-89%). Fall 2015.

  • HTM 250-Written report of the functions or duties performed in the different departments at the student’s work-sites including hotel/lodgings, restaurant/food services, and travel/tourism agencies, 100% or 2/2 received an unsatisfactory rating due to incompletion in Fall 2015;100% or 4/4 achieved a rating of ‘satisfactory’ (80-89%) in Spring 2016. [TARGET: 100% to achieve at least satisfactory (80-89%) rating.]

PSLO#2:

  • Review a case study on the application of yield management in the lodging industries. HTM 150 (Fall 2015)-100% or 11/11 achieved a score of 35/50 (70%) or better. [TARGET: 70% to achieve 70% or better.]

  • Demonstration exercise on calculation of guest accommodation charges, receipt of payments, and reconciling the accounts receivables. [TARGET: 70% to achieve at least 70% accuracy.]

PSLO#2:

  • HTM 250- Practicum student performance evaluation at work site for lodging skills. Student produced a brief summary of work experience in correspondence to time sheets and supervisor's evaluation form; Fall 2014 (1/1) incomplete hours; 100% achieved 80% or better-Spring 2015 (3/3); Summer 2015 (4/4). [TARGET: 100% to achieve 70% or better]
  • Participating service providers included Cliff Rainbow Hotel, 7Stars Inn, Sea Breeze Hotel, Yvonne’s Hotel, and Mangrove Bay Hotel.
      • HTM150 (Fall 2015)- 91% or 10/11 achieved at least 70% accuracy in calculations.
      • HTM170 (Spring2016) 100% or 9/9 achieved at least 70% accuracy in calculations.
  • Case scenario activities to perform the night audit functions. [TARGET: 60% to achieve at least a good rating (70-79%).]
      • HTM150 (Fall 2015)- 91% or 10/11 achieved a rating of ‘good’ (70-79%) or ‘satisfactory’ (80-89%).
      • HTM170 (Spring 2016)- 100% or 9/9 achieved a rating of ‘good’ (70-79%) or ‘satisfactory’ (80-89%).

PSLO#3:

  • Demonstration of learned knowledge on basic culinary techniques and skills in a full service public teaching restaurant setting; including food costing, menu planning, quantity cooking, portioning, guest check calculating, and cashiering.
      • HTM150 (Fall 2015)- for food costing only: 91% or 10/11 achieved a rating of ‘good’ (70-79%) or ‘satisfactory’ (80-89%). [TARGET: 60% to achieve a rating of good (70-79%) or better.]
      • HTM170 (Spring 2016)- 100% or 9/9 achieved a rating of ‘good’ (70-79%) or ‘satisfactory’ (80-89%).
      • HTM250 (Spring 2016)-100% or 4/4 achieved a rating of ‘satisfactory’ (80- 89%) or ‘exemplary’ (90-100%). [TARGET: 100% to achieve a rating of good (70-79%) or better.]

  • Laboratory exercises demonstrating proper food handling safety with regards to storage and cooking temperatures; and illustrating the common standard meat cuts, poultry cuts, and seafood portioning standards.
      • HTM250 (Spring 2016)-100% or 4/4 achieved a rating of ‘satisfactory’ (80- 89%) or ‘exemplary’ (90-100%). [TARGET: 100% to achieve a rating of good (70-79%) or better.]

What are we planning to work on

  • Increasing target ratings to achieve 100% accuracy for calculation activities dealing with cashiering, guest accommodation charges, receipt of payments, and reconciling the accounts receivables through more practical applications in courses HTM150, HTM170, HTM220 and HTM250.

Recommendations for students:

  • Students are advised to successfully complete EN110, EN120, and at least MS099 by the first semester.
  • Students are advised to successfully complete AC131 prior to taking HTM150 or HTM170.

Program Data Sheet
September 2016

Download PDF Version of the Data Sheet

Enrollment by Major and Campus

Major degree term Chuuk Kosrae National Pohnpei Yap students
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Fall 2011   1 8 58 2 69
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Fall 2012     7 63 2 72
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Fall 2013     4 50 1 55
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Fall 2014     7 38 1 46
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Fall 2015 2 1 9 44 7 63
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Spring 2011   1 7 46 1 55
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Spring 2012     8 54 3 65
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Spring 2013     9 54 2 65
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Spring 2014     3 46 1 50
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Spring 2015   1 3 37 2 43
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Spring 2016     5 40 7 52

Credits by Major and Campus

Major degree term Chuuk Kosrae National Pohnpei Yap Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Fall 2011   12 98 687 22 819
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Fall 2012     92 724 28 844
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Fall 2013     50 595 11 656
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Fall 2014     83 420 3 506
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Fall 2015 30 9 121 469 69 698
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Spring 2011   13 90 579 7 689
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Spring 2012     86 710 21 817
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Spring 2013     109 620 20 749
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Spring 2014     32 522 8 562
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Spring 2015   12 33 407 20 472
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Spring 2016     57 461 76 594

Credits by Program and Campus

Program term Chuuk Kosrae National Pohnpei Yap Credits
Hospitality and Tourism Management (AS) Fall 2011     54 357   411
Hospitality and Tourism Management (AS) Fall 2012     39 333   372
Hospitality and Tourism Management (AS) Fall 2013     18 240   258
Hospitality and Tourism Management (AS) Fall 2014       192   192
Hospitality and Tourism Management (AS) Fall 2015     21 165   186
Hospitality and Tourism Management (AS) Spring 2011     84 390   474
Hospitality and Tourism Management (AS) Spring 2012     39 402   441
Hospitality and Tourism Management (AS) Spring 2013     30 267   297
Hospitality and Tourism Management (AS) Spring 2014       258   258
Hospitality and Tourism Management (AS) Spring 2015       222   222
Hospitality and Tourism Management (AS) Spring 2016     142 376 76 594

Credits Enrolled, Attempted and Earned (averages)

Credits Enrolled, Attempted and Earned (averages) degree term credEnrollAvg credAttAvg credEarnAvg termGPAAvg
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Fall 2011 11.9 9.6 8.2 2.27
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Fall 2012 11.7 10.3 8.5 2.13
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Fall 2013 11.9 10.6 9.8 2.46
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Fall 2014 10.8 460.0 8.7 2.10
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Fall 2015 11.2 9.7 8.7 2.36
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Spring 2011 12.5 11.1 9.4 2.23
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Spring 2012 12.6 11.0 8.8 1.96
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Spring 2013 11.5 10.0 7.6 1.86
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Spring 2014 11.2 10.6 9.7 2.40
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Spring 2015 11.0 9.6 8.5 2.56
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Spring 2016 11.4 10.8 9.5 2.38

Program Sections, Enrollment Ratio and Average Class Size

Program term section enrollMax enrollment enrollRatio AvgClassSize
Hospitality and Tourism Management (AS) Fall 2011 10 252 134 53.2% 13.4
Hospitality and Tourism Management (AS) Fall 2012 9 196 117 59.7% 13.0
Hospitality and Tourism Management (AS) Fall 2013 8 155 75 48.4% 9.4
Hospitality and Tourism Management (AS) Fall 2014 5 105 64 61.0% 12.8
Hospitality and Tourism Management (AS) Fall 2015 5 114 57 50.0% 11.4
Hospitality and Tourism Management (AS) Spring 2011 9 225 150 66.7% 16.7
Hospitality and Tourism Management (AS) Spring 2012 10 210 137 65.2% 13.7
Hospitality and Tourism Management (AS) Spring 2013 8 140 90 64.3% 11.3
Hospitality and Tourism Management (AS) Spring 2014 7 125 86 68.8% 12.3
Hospitality and Tourism Management (AS) Spring 2015 6 115 65 56.5% 10.8
Hospitality and Tourism Management (AS) Spring 2016 5 110 58 52.7% 11.6

Persistence and Retention (new full time students)

MajorDescription degree New Students FT 2011_3 Students 2012_1 Students 2012_3 Persistence Spring 2012 Retention Fall 2012
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS 16 13 8 81.3% 50.0%
Major degree New FT Fall 2012 Persisted Spring 2013 Retained Fall 2013 Persistence Spring 2013 Retention Fall 2013
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS 9 6 5 66.7% 55.6%
Major degree New FT Fall 2013 Persisted Spring 2014 Retained Fall 2014 Persistence Spring 2013 Retention Fall 2014
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS 8 5 8 62.5% 100.0%
Major degree New FT Fall 2014 Persisted Spring 2015 Retained Fall 2015 Persistence Spring 2015 Retention Fall 2015
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS 8 10 7 125.0% 87.5%
Major degree New FT Fall 2015 Persisted Spring 2016 Retained Fall 2016 Persistence Spring 2016 Retention Fall 2016
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS 5 4   80.0% 0.0%

Course Completion & Withdrawals (Major)

Major degree term students ABCorP% ABCDorP% W%
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Fall 2011 274 68.6% 76.3% 8.0%
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Fall 2012 264 69.3% 75.4% 6.1%
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Fall 2013 214 72.0% 80.8% 9.3%
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Fall 2014 168 69.0% 79.2% 5.4%
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Fall 2015 219 71.7% 73.71% 12.33%
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Spring 2011 225 72.4% 80.0% 4.9%
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Spring 2012 270 67.4% 74.4% 7.0%
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Spring 2013 253 58.9% 72.3% 12.3%
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Spring 2014 182 74.7% 86.3% 5.5%
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Spring 2015 148 73.6% 89.6% 3.9%
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Spring 2016 194 76.8% 84.0% 4.6%

Course Completion & Withdrawals (Program)

Program term students ABCorP% ABCDorP% W%
Hospitality and Tourism Management (AS) Fall 2011 137 70.8% 80.3% 2.2%
Hospitality and Tourism Management (AS) Fall 2012 124 79.8% 83.9% 5.6%
Hospitality and Tourism Management (AS) Fall 2013 86 66.3% 75.6% 12.8%
Hospitality and Tourism Management (AS) Fall 2014 64 76.6% 87.5% 4.7%
Hospitality and Tourism Management (AS) Fall 2015 62 80.6% 83.9% 8.1%
Hospitality and Tourism Management (AS) Spring 2011 158 74.7% 83.5% 5.1%
Hospitality and Tourism Management (AS) Spring 2012 147 77.6% 85.7% 5.4%
Hospitality and Tourism Management (AS) Spring 2013 99 72.7% 76.8% 9.1%
Hospitality and Tourism Management (AS) Spring 2014 86 75.6% 86.0% 9.3%
Hospitality and Tourism Management (AS) Spring 2015 74 77.0% 79.7% 12.2%
Hospitality and Tourism Management (AS) Spring 2016 60 81.7% 88.3% 6.7%

Graduates

Major degree AY2010/11 AY2011/12 AY2012/13 AY2013/14 AY2014/15 AY2015/16
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS 4 10 12 11 5 6

Graduate Rates

Major degree Cohort cohort Graduation Rate 100% Graduation Rate 150% Graduation Rate 200%
Hospitality and Tourism Management AS Fall 2008 FT 6 0.0% 16.7% 50.0%
Hospitality Management AS Fall 2009 FT 6 16.7% 66.7% 133.3%
Hospitality Management AS Fall 2010 FT 12 0.0% 8.3%  
Hospitality Management AS Fall 2011 FT 16 0.0% 6.3% 6.3%
Hospitality Management AS Fall 2012 FT 9 0.0% 0.0%  
Hospitality Management AS Fall 2013 FT 8 0.0% 0.0%  

 

  • "Program" information is based on Dickeson's concept of a "program" as expending resoruces and is linked to courses owned by a program from TracDat
  • Graduation rates are based on Fall new students(full time) cohorts that are tracked at 100%, 150%, and 200%
  • Retention rates are based on Fall new students (full time) cohorts who return the following fall semester
  • Persistence rates are based on Fall new students (full time) cohrots who return the following spring semester

Program Review (Pohnpei Campus)

AP Full Official:Hospitality and Tourism Management (HTM) Program

Campus: Pohnpei Campus

Completed by: Debra W. Perman

AP Review Submission Date: 4/08/2014

AR Review Cycle: Fall 2011 to Spring 2013

    • Program Mission

      Mission: The Hospitality and Tourism Management (HTM) AS degree program is committed to cultivating students with the fundamental concepts, knowledge, practices, and skills in hospitality and tourism for the pursuit of advanced degree(s) and/or for the purpose of employment or advancement in the industries of hospitality and/or tourism.

    • Program Goals

      The primary goal of the HTM program is to provide students with the basic skills needed to succeed as supervisors, managers or business entrepreneurs in the food service, lodging, airline, travel provider, attraction, interpretation, and general tourism industries. The program aims to prepare students to become productive workers, owners and managers in the growing fields of hospitality and tourism within the FSM and internationally.

      Program Student Learning Outcomes (PSLOs)
      At the completion of the Hospitality & Tourism Management Program, the student will be able to:

      1. Explain the interdependent components of the international hospitality and tourism industry including transportation, customer service, food service, lodging, recreation management, roles of national and state visitors’ authorities, marketing and sales.
      2. Demonstrate professional lodging specific technical skills, supervisory techniques and management skills.
      3. Explain the types and elements of food service operations.
      4. Demonstrate front of the house technical and supervision techniques.
      5. Describe tourism attraction support services and related business opportunities.
      6. Describe the importance of developing the FSM as a sustainable tourism destination.
      7. Communicate in basic Japanese for lodging, food service and tourism provider guest services.

    • Program History

      During the academic year 1996-1997, the program was developed and implemented to fulfill the need for qualified tourism providers as put forth by the FSM National and State governments. It officially started in the fall semester of 1998 as the Hotel Restaurant Management (HRM) program, focusing mainly on hospitality practices for hotels and restaurants. Eventually, it was modified to Hospitality and Tourism Management (HTM) program expanding the scope to include tourism. Key players of the program’s origin were former HTM Professor Howard Rice and then Campus Director Penny Weilbacher.

      From the fall of 1998 to the spring of 2010, Howard Rice served as division chair for the program. To support the College’s efforts towards streamlining, the HTM division was reorganized in the summer of 2010 to merge with the Pohnpei campus Business and Computer divisions, which runs the Secretarial Science and Bookkeeping certificate programs. The division has since been renamed the Hospitality and Tourism Management/Business (HTM/BU) Division and is currently chaired by Debra W. Perman.

      Since the academic year 2011-2012, significant changes or activities that have taken place in the program include:

      1. Remodeling of the division office space and removal of the Purple Inn (teaching hotel lobby and room) to accommodate a classroom for HTM classes as well as other classes for up to 15 students and also utilized as a student study and tutorial area;
      2. HTM165 Food Fundamentals and Quantity Cooking and HTM220 Food and Beverage Management classes have a scheduled semester field trip to one of the local restaurants to provide students first-hand dining experience as they apply knowledge and skills in the teaching restaurant, the Blue Plate Café;
      3. In spring 2011, the program joined the T&T annual programs exhibit scheduled every April; and
      4. Annual on-island or off-island excursions (when funding is available) for top students to stay and work in all the different departments at a selected hotel or resort within the FSM: spring 2011 1st on-island excursion during spring break at the Cliff Rainbow Hotel, fall 2011 1st off-island excursion at the Kosrae Nautilus Resort, and the most recent re-visit to Kosrae Nautilus Resort last fall 2013.

    • Program Descriptions

      The HTM program is designed to enable students to become productive workers, owners and managers in the growing fields of hospitality and tourism within the FSM and internationally. The program provides students with the basic skills needed to succeed as supervisors, manager or business owners in the food service, lodging, airlines, travel provider and general tourism industries. Students will learn the importance of building a sustainable tourism economy in the Nation and abroad. They will have the opportunity to examine how the nation fits into the international travel system and the importance of providing top quality service as a foundation for developing a vibrant industry. Specific subject areas cover all aspects of the lodging, food service and travel industries.

      Source: General Catalog 2013-2014 (page 51)

    • Program Admission Requirements

      Admissions Criteria: Applicants must meet the following admission requirements to be matriculated into a degree program:

      1. Have graduated or will graduate from high school at the end of the current school year, or have a General Educational Development or GED certificate;
      2. Have a minimum high school grade point average of 2.0 as measured on a 4.0 scale, or a minimal score of 35 on each section and an average score of 45 on all sections of the GED test; and
      3. Be accepted by the Committee on Recruitment, Admissions and Retention.

      Source: General Catalog, 2013-2014,http://www.comfsm.fm/publications/catalog-2013-2014/requirements.pdf

    • Program Certificate/Degree Requirements

      In addition to the COM-FSM general education core course (29 credits) requirements, students must successfully complete the following required major courses in order to graduate.

      HTM Core Courses (24 credits)
      HTM 110 Introduction to Hospitality and Tourism Management (3)
      HTM 120 Introduction to World Tourism (3)
      HTM 150 Hospitality Supervision (3)
      HTM 165 Food Fundamentals and Quantity Cooking (3)
      HTM 170 Front Office Management (3)
      HTM 220 Food and Beverage Management (3)
      HTM 230 Hospitality Marketing (3)
      HTM250 Facilities Management and Practicum* (3)

      *Includes 150 practicum hours working in a travel, tourism, restaurant, and hotel establishment.

      Business Courses (7 credits))
      BU101 Introduction to Business (3)
      AC 13 Accounting I (4))

      Humanities (Japanese Language) (6 credits)
      FL120 Basic Japanese for HTM (3)
      FL160 Situational Japanese for HTM (3)

      Major Requirements:     37 credits
      Open Elective:     3 credits
      General Education Core Requirements:     29 credits
      GRADUATION REQUIREMENT:     69 credits

    • Program Courses and Enrollment

      Spring 2014
      Course F11 Sp12 Su12 F12 Sp13
      HTM 110 22/25=88% 22/25=88% - 10/25=40% -
      24/25=96% 15/25=60%
      HTM 120 12/25 = 48% 15/25 = 60% - 11/25 = 44% 18/25 = 72%
      HTM 150 - 16/25 = 64% - 9/25 = 36% 10/25 = 40%
      HTM 165 11/15 = 73% 15/15 = 100% - 14/15 = 93% -
      HTM 170 11/25 = 44% - - 20/25 = 80% -
      HTM 220 9/25 = 36% 8/25= 32% - 13/25 = 52% 9/25 = 36%
      HTM 230 - 21/25 = 84% - - 10/25 = 40%
      HTM 250 6/10 = 60% 4/10 = 40% 2/10 = 20% - 11/11 =100%
      AC 131 - 23/25 = 92% - - 21/25 = 84%
      BU 101 26/26 = 100% - - 15/15 = 100% -
      FL 120 27/27 = 100% 25/25 = 100% - 25/25 = 100% 18/25 = 72%
      FL 160 11/25 = 44% 16/25 = 64% - 5/25 = 20% 9/25 = 36%
      Mean Fill Rates: 74% 68% - 69% 60%
      • HTM165 class can only accommodate a maximum of 15 students since it is situated in the Blue Plate Café kitchen.
      • HTM250 class is the capstone course for the program, which normally has fewer than 10 students

      Source: COM-FSM Pohnpei Campus OAR and IRPO

    • Program Faculty

      Name Degree Rank Status Note
      Anna Dela Cruz BS Instructor FT 12/2013-End of contract
      Debra W. Perman MBA, BBA Assoc. Prof. & Div. Chair FT  
      Joyce Roby AS, BS (pending) Instructor FT  
      Gary Bloom JD, BA Instructor PT AY11-12
      Akiko Kamikubo MA Instructor PT AY11-13
      Mike Hilbert MBA Instructor PT AY11-12
      Yoriko Tanigawa MA Instructor PT AY11-12


      Faculty/Student Ratio Per Academic Year
      AY2011-2012 Average Enrollment: 68 AY2012-2013 Average Enrollment: 69
      6:68 4:69
      1:11 1:17
    • Program Indicators

      1. Assessment of course student learning outcomes of program courses

      Data indicates percentage (%) of total enrollment per course that successfully met each corresponding course CSLO per semester.
      Fall 2011 Course Student Learning Outcomes (CSLOs)
      CSLO# 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
      HTM110 81 75 75 75 70 70 70 75 60 75
      Combined results for both sections
      HTM120 75 75 75 75 75          
      HTM165 80 80 80 80 80          
      HTM170 89 89 67 78            
      HTM220 89 89 89 89            
      HTM250 67 67 67 &nbps;            
      BU 101 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92  
      FL 120 52 52                
      FL 160 67 67                


      Spring 2012 Course Student Learning Outcomes (CSLOs)
      CSLO# 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
      HTM110 74 74 80 58 68 80 57 80 50 74
      Combined results for both sections
      HTM120 87 87 87 87 87          
      HTM165 100 75 50 95 75          
      HTM150 81 81 81 81            
      HTM220 100 100 67 100            
      HTM250 100 100 100 &nbps;            
      AC131 93 93 93 &nbps;            
      FL 120 77 77                
      FL 160 100 100                


      Fall 2012 Course Student Learning Outcomes (CSLOs)
      CSLO# 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
      HTM110 70 70 70              
      100 100 100              
      HTM120 67 67 67 67 67          
      HTM150 100 87 87 87            
      HTM165 75 85 92 65 80          
      HTM170 100 95 95 95            
      HTM220 92 92 92 92 92 92        
      BU 101 79 79 79 79 79 79 79 79 79  
      FL 120 71 71   &nbps;            
      FL 160 80 80                


      Spring 2013 Course Student Learning Outcomes (CSLOs)
      CSLO# 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
      HTM120 83 83 83 83 83          
      HTM150 73 73 73 73          
      HTM 220 90 90 90 90            
      HTM230 95 95 95 95 95          
      HTM 250 82 82 82              
      AC 131 94 94 94              
      FL 120 56 56   &nbps;            
      FL 160 89 89                

      Source: Program Course Level Assessment reports

      2. Assessment of program student learning outcomes

      Program Student Learning Outcomes Assessment
      (AY 2011-2012)

      What we looked at:

      • PLO#2 Demonstrate professional lodging specific technical skills, supervisory techniques and management skills.
      • PLO#3 Explain the types and elements of food service operations.
      • HTM 150, HTM165, HTM 170, HTM220, and HTM250 CSLOs.

      Evaluation questions posed:

      • Q#1: Are students able to demonstrate professional lodging specific technical skills, supervisory techniques and management skills?
      • Q#2. Are students able to demonstrate proper food service operations skills in a restaurant setting?
      • Q#3. Do the courses such as HTM 150, HTM165, HTM 170, HTM220, and HTM250 have the proper allotted contact hours for successful instructional delivery?

      What we found:

      • For PLO#2, students in the HTM170 Front Office Management class were assessed based on written quizzes, exams, and performance in the former teaching hotel, the Purple Inn. Of the 11 students assessed, 3 rated excellent, 4 good, and 4 satisfactory; and students in the HTM250 Facilities Management and Practicum class were assessed based on practice interview and field work and evaluations from supervisors at practicum sites. Of the 10 students assessed, 3 rated excellent, 4 good, 2 poor, and 1 unacceptable.
      • For PLO#3, students in the HTM165 Food Fundamentals & Quantity Cooking class were assessed based on written quizzes and exams and hands on practice in the HTM teaching kitchen. Of the 14 students assessed, 4 rated excellent, 6 good, and 4 satisfactory; students in the HTM220 Food and Beverage Management class were assessed based on quizzes and exams and their performance in operating the Blue Plate Café. Of the 9 assessed, 1 rated good and the rest rated fair; and students in the HTM250 class were assessed based on practice interview and fieldwork and evaluations from supervisors at practicum sites. Of the 10 students assessed, 3 rated excellent, 4 good, 2 poor, and 1 unacceptable.
      • In regards to Q#3 above, assessment was based on informal interviews and surveys with division faculty teaching and students enrolled in the courses. For both HTM165 and HTM220 classes, actual logged hours for preparation for each class required more than 2 hours and actual delivery about 2 hours; for HTM150 and HTM170, certain course contents tend to over lap and for the latter course, there is insufficient class time to adequately perform practical hands on activities in hotel lodgings; and for HTM250, instructors and site supervisors found that the current 150 practicum hours is not adequate enough for students in order to fully demonstrate CSLOs at a mastery level.

      What we plan to do:

      • To address findings for PLO#2, we plan to have more hands-on applications at actual hotels to allow for real-life experiences in hotel lodgings.
      • To address findings for PLO#3, we plan to modify current scheduling of hands-on application practices of starting after midterms to commence by 4th week of instructions to allow for more time to practice front and back operations of the Blue Plate Café.
      • To address findings of Q#3, we plan to carefully review all SLOs of the said courses and determine whether there is a need for course modifications or new class scheduling strategies.

      Note: For worksheet details of the above summary, please follow this link:http://wiki.comfsm.fm/@api/deki/files/1589/=AY2011_12_PCHTM_W3.pdf

      Program Student Learning Outcomes Assessment
      (AY 2012-2013)

      What we looked at:
      HTM PSLO 7-Communicate in basic Japanese for lodging, food service and tourism provider guest services. Related courses FL120 Basic Japanese for HTM and FL160 Situational Japanese for HTM

      Evaluation question posed:
      Do HTM graduates need both FL120 and FL160 to successfully meet PSLO7?,

      What we found:

      • PSLO#7: For FL120, 62% passed with ratings above satisfactory on written exams measuring listening skills and word and phrase comprehension.
      • For FL160, only 55% of students rated exemplary, good, or satisfactory on oral and written quizzes measuring listening skills and comprehension of basic words and phrases for lodging, food service and tourism provider guest service.
      • FL120 successfully meets PSLO#7 provided that additional dialogue and phrase exercises are incorporated into the existing SLOs.
      • FL160 - In order for students to successfully carry on a conversation in Japanese for any hospitality setting, there is a need for extensive practice for both speaking and listening skills and continuous use of short dialogues in which the course does not provide for at this stage. Teaching method needs to be modified to provide for more oral practices and demonstrations such as workshops and role-playing in a restaurant setting.

      What we plan to do:

      • Course modification of FL120 to incorporate some SLOs from FL160 making FL120 the required course to fulfill PSLO7 thus reducing the program required credits. FL160 is to become an elective course for those who wish to expand their Japanese speaking skills.

      Source: http://wiki.comfsm.fm/@api/deki/files/3198/=AY12_13Unit_Assessment_Report_-_Four_Column.pdf

      http://wiki.comfsm.fm/@api/deki/files/3196/=FL160_AY12_13Unit_Course_Assessment_Report_-_Four_Column.pdf



      3. Program enrollment (historical enrollment patterns, student credits by major)

      Term F11 Sp12 F12 Sp13 Total(2yrs)
      Total Enrollment 70 65 72 65 -
      Total Credits 836 817 844 749 3,246

      4. Average class size

      Term F11 SP12 F12 SP13
      Average Class Size 13.4 13.7 13 11.3

      5. Course completion rate

      Term F11 SP12 F12 SP13
      Course Completion Rate (%) 70.8 77.6 79.8 72.7

      6. Student persistence rate (semester to semester)

      Term F11 SP12 F12 SP13
      Persistence Rate (%) 81.3 66.7

      7. Student retention rate (Fall-to-Fall for two-year programs; Fall-to-Spring for one-year programs)

      Term F11 F12
      Retention Rate (%) 50 55.6

      8. Success rates on licensing or certification exams (CTE, TP, Nursing, etc)

      N/A

      9. Graduation rate based on yearly number

      AY10/11 AY11/12 AY12/13
      4 10 12

      Source: Program Data Sheet HTM, IRPO


      • The above table shows the number of graduates per academic year.
      • The table below shows graduates that were tracked from their first semester of enrollment from fall 2008, 2009, and 2010 and the number of semesters they completed the program in terms of the following:
        • 100% = 4 semesters or 2 years.
        • 150% = 6 semesters or 3 years.
        • 200% = 8 semesters or 4 years.

        Cohorts AY11/12 AY12/13 100% 150% 200%
        Fall 2008 3 3 0 16.7% 50%(3)
        Fall 2009 4 2 16.7%(1) 66.7%(4) 16.7%(1)
        Fall 2010 - 1 0 8.3%(1) -
      • Although there were 12 graduates in AY12/13, only one student was part of the 3 cohort years, namely Fall 2010 and graduated within 3 years of enrollment.
      • The table below provides details of each graduate:
          Graduate Enrolled Graduated %
        1 Hadley, Ella Fall 2002 Fall 2011  
        2 Cantero, Saterina Fall 2008 Fall 2011 150%;
        3 Charley, Janet Summer 2009 Fall 2011 150%;
        4 Lawrence, Maryleen H. Fall 1999 Spring 2012  
        5 Mudong, Jennifer Fall 2003 Spring 2012  
        6 Jim, Luelen Fall 2008 Spring 2012 200%
        7 Ardos, Tiffany Fall 2009 Spring 2012 200%
        8 Hairens, Cassandra Fall 2009 Spring 2012 200%
        9 Wendolin, Alwis Fall 2009 Spring 2012 200%
        10 Pedrus, Kimberly Spring 2010 Spring 2012  
        11 Solomon, Angeleen Fall 2003 Spring 2013  
        12 Pretrick, Stephance Fall 2006 Spring 2013  
        13 Epeoseram, Arson Fall 2007 Spring 2013  
        14 John, Yumilanda Fall 2007 Spring 2013  
        15 Rafiyeoiut, Arlen Fall 2008 Spring 2013 250%
        16 Pablo, Marcia Fall 2009 Spring 2013 200%
        17 Sanots, Lewis Jr. Fall 2009 Spring 2013 200%
        18 Sanots, Lewis Jr. Fall 2009 Spring 2013 250%
        19 Lauweirig, Iolani Renee Fall 2008 Spring 2013 250%
        20 Olmos, Steniet J. Fall 2008 Spring 2013 250%
        21 Amor, Jay Joe Fall 2010 Spring 2013 150%
      • Source: PC OAR

      10. Students seat cost

      Based on the tuition rate of $105/credit, total seat cost for major course requirements is $3,885. The table below shows detailed information.

      Major Courses Cr Rate Seat Cost
      HTM110 3 $105 $315
      HTM120 3 $105 $315
      HTM150 3 $105 $315
      HTM165 3 $105 $315
      HTM170 3 $105 $315
      HTM220 3 $105 $315
      HTM230 3 $105 $315
      HTM250 3 $105 $315
      FL 120 3 $105 $315
      FL 160 3 $105 $315
      BU 101 3 $105 $315
      AC 131 3 $105 $420
      Total 37 $105 $3,885

      11. Revenue Generated by the Program

      Revenue Sources: Tuition, enrollment fees, lab fees for HTM165 & 220 classes and Blue Plate Café sales (teaching restaurant). Source Rate AY11/12 AY12/13 Total Revenue

      Source Rate AY11/12 AY12/13 Total Revenue
      Tuition Fee $105 1653 1593 $340,830
      Enrollment Fees $50 135 137 $13,600
      Technology Fees $100 135 137 $27,200
      HTM Lab Fee $25 43 36 $1,975
      Graduation Fee $36.50 10 12 $803
      BPC Sales   $968.05 $1,773.55 $2,742
      TOTAL       $387,150

      12. Cost of duplicate or redundant courses, program, or services.

      NONE

      13. Students’ satisfaction rate

      Of the 36 survey answer options, only 5 were selected as a sampling for students’ responses.

      N = 12     SA=Strongly Agree; A=Agree; D=Disagree; SD=Strongly Disagree

      Answer Options SA A D SD
      1. Internships or practical experiences are provided in the HTM program 5 5 2  
      2. Faculty are fair and unbiased 1 10 1  
      3. Classes are scheduled at times that are convenient 3 6 3  
      4. Faculty provide timely feedback about student 2 9 1  
      5. Nearly all classes deal with practical experiences 1 9 2  

      Source: IRPO Compiled Student Survey

      14. Alumni data and Employment data and employer feedback (employer survey)

      Alumnus Graduated Status (Employed/School)
      Cantero, Saterina Fall 2011 US Embassy, Kolonia
      Charley, Janet Fall 2011 2nd deg COM-FSM
      Hadley, Ella Fall 2011 2nd deg COM-FSM
      Ardos, Tiffany Spring 2012 2nd deg COM-FSM
      Hairens, Cassandra Spring 2012 2nd deg COM-FSM
      Jim, Luelen Spring 2012 2nd deg COM-FSM
      Lawrence, Maryleen H Spring 2012 FSM Banking Board
      Mudong, Jennifer Spring 2012 EPA, Pohnpei
      Pedrus, Kimberly Spring 2012 Sheraton Laguna Guam Resort
      Wendolin, Alwis Spring 2012 Unknown
      Epeoseram, Arson Spring 2013 Cupid’s Bar & Grill, Pohnpei
      John, Yumilanda Spring 2013 Unknown
      Pablo, Marcia Spring 2013 Unknown
      Pretrick, Stephance Spring 2013 Unknown
      Rafiyeoiut, Arlen Spring 2013 2nd deg COM-FSM
      Sanots, Lewis Jr. Spring 2013 UOG
      Solomon, Angeleen Spring 2013 Unknown
      Amor, Jay Joe Spring 2013 Unknown
      Edward, Cynthia Spring 2013 2nd deg COM-FSM
      Lauweirig, Iolani Renee Spring 2013 UOG
      Olmos, Steniet J. Spring 2013 Namiki Store

      15. Program added or cancelled at nearby regional institutions (PCC, GCC, Hawaii schools, UOG, CMI, NMC)

      Institution Program Degree Certificates
      Palau Community College Tourism & Hospitality AAS  
      Kapiolani Community College 1. Hospitality
      2. Tourism & Travel
      3. Culinary Arts
      AS
      AS
      AS
      COA, COC, & CC
      Guam Community College 1. Culinary Arts
      2. Hotel Operations
      3. Food & Beverage Management
      4. Travel & Tourism
      AA
      AS
      AS
      AS
       
      Northern Marianas College Hospitality & Tourism AS
      BS pending
       
      University of Guam Business Administration (International Tourism & Hospitality Mgt) BBA  
      University of Hawaii-Manoa Travel Industry Mgt BS  

      16. Transfer rate

      Semester graduated Total graduates Working In school No Information
      Fall 2011 3 3 1  
      Spring 2012 7 3 3 1
      Fall 2012 0 - - -
      Spring/Su 2013 11 2 4 5
    • Analysis

      Findings:

      This section provides discussion of information discovered as a result of the evaluation such as problems or concerns with the program and what part of the program is working well and meeting expectation.

      1. Assessment of CSLOs:

      • HTM110-In AY11-12, less than 70% of students enrolled in both semesters successfully met by CSLOs 4, 5, 7, & 9.
      • HTM120-Fall 2012 revealed only 67% successfully met all CSLOs.
      • HTM165-In Sp12 and F12 less than 70% met CSLO 4.
      • HTM170-Fall 2011 revealed only 67% successfully met CSLO 3.
      • HTM220-Spring 2012 revealed only 67% successfully met CSLO 3.
      • HTM250-Fall 2011 revealed only 67% successfully met all CSLOs.
      • FL120-Fall 2011 revealed only 52% successfully met all CSLOs and Spring 2012 only 56%.
      • FL160-Fall 2011 revealed only 67% successfully met all CSLOs.

      2. Assessment of PSLOs:

      • Based on instructors' comments and observations in AY11/12 worksheet #3, HTM165 needs to be a lecture/lab based course;
      • As a result of AY12/13 assessment, FL120 is adequate to fulfill PLO#7;

      3. Enrollment:

      • There is a slight increase of 3% in enrollment.

      4. Class Average size:

      • The average class size for most HTM courses is 13.

      5. Course completion

      • Rates are at an average of 70%.

      6 &7. Persistence and Retention:

      • Persistence rates dropped from 81.3% to 66.7%. Of the 16 full-time enrolled in fall 2011, 13 persisted to the next semester and half retained through fall 2012. Of the 9 enrolled in the fall 2012, 6 persisted to the next semester and 55.6% or 5 retained through fall 2013.

      Graduates complete the program ready to work at entry to mid-level positions and not at supervisory or management level as indicated in program description.

      Growing trend with graduates coming back for 2nd degree due to lack of jobs directly related to this field;

      Students' completion of program exceeding 100% or 2 years.

      Recommendations:

      This section provides recommendations from the program on what to do to improve or enhance the quality of program and course learning outcomes as well as program goals and objectives. This section should also include suggestions that describe how the program might be able to create opportunities for a better program in the future. Some examples are exploring alternate delivery mechanisms, forming external partnerships, or realigning with other programs.

      • Program description, goals, and learning outcomes need to be modified and updated to address CSLO rates below 70%.
      • Explore the possibility of converting HTM165 and 220 into 3 credit each lecture/lab-based courses.
      • Propose to change FL160 course as an elective since FL120 fulfills PLO#7 according to PAS 2012/2013. This will address the need to reduce program credits required for graduation.
      • Modification of course structure, outline, and textbook for FL120;
      • Students are strongly recommended to take FL120 before (or at the same time) they take HTM220 since they can utilize Japanese phrases that they have learned in a practical situation.
      • Implement job-shadowing program for HTM students who have completed at least 50% of HTM core courses to gain work experience in the areas of tourism, travel, and hotel lodgings prior to performing capstone practicum.

Unit Assessment Report

Report Period: 2013-2014

This website and all COM-FSM Internet based services are best viewed with Firefox 3.0 or better.
© Copyright 2014 College of Micronesia-FSM | Site Disclaimer
P. O. Box 159, Kolonia, Pohnpei, 96941 - (691) 320-2480
College of Micronesia-FSM is accredited by the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges,
Western Association of Schools and Colleges, 10 Commercial Bldv., Suite 204, Novato, CA 94949, (415) 506-0234,
an institutional accrediting body recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation and the U.S. Department of Education.
Additional information about accreditation, including the filing of complaints against member institutions, can be found at: www.accjc.org

feedback