Micronesian Studies

  • PSLO
  • Data Sheet
  • Program Review
  • Assessment Report

Program Student Learning Outcomes Assessment
(AY 2013-2014)

Program Student Learning Outcomes(PSLOs)

At the completion of Micronesian Studies Program, the student will be able to:

  1. Enrich and deepen self-knowledge by exploring different academic experiences.
  2. Articulate and understand their experiences through effective writing, reading, speaking and various modes of artistic expression.
  3. Demonstrate fundamental knowledge and basic skills appropriate to their personal and professional goals in their chosen area of specialization.

PSLO Assessment Report Summary

What we looked at:

The Micronesian Studies Program assessment focused on PSLOs 1, 3, and 5.

PSLO 1was assessed on a common essay, with a scoring rubric developed the Micronesian Studies faculty. A Common essay was administered to the upper-level SS courses to assess this. The question will allow students to explain their understanding of the major concepts in the program which include: social, political, and economic influences. The courses are SS195, SS200, SS205, SS212, SS220, and SS280. The identified courses will be assessed, using a scoring rubric, on a range of 1-5; where 1=F, 2=D, C=3, 4=B, and 5=A. Common essays were administered the 14th & 15th weeks of Fall 2013 and Spring 2014 as part of an in-class work.

PSLO 3 was assessed by research papers, with a scoring rubric collected in the courses. ). The rubric used to assess the research papers looked the following criteria: Thesis/Problem; Information Seeking; Analysis; Synthesis; Documentation; & Product/Process.

PSLO 5 was assessed, using an exit survey questionnaire.

Listed below are the results for each of the PSLOs.

What we found:

  • PSLO#1: The following was found:
    The Result of Common Essay for SY 2013-2014
    Course Assess fro SY 2013-2014 Total Assessed #% of Students passed with a grade "C" or better #% of Students failed with grad D or lower
    SS195-Micronesia Cultural Studies 47 41 or 87% 6 or 13%
    SS200-Research Methods 41 35 or 85% 6 or 15%
    SS205-Micro. Gov't & Politics 28 19 or 68% 6 or 15%
    SS212-Econ. Of Micronesia 43 38 or 88% 5 or 12%
    SS220-Contemporary Issues 32 31 or 97% 1 or 3.1%
    SS280-Directed Study 32 12 or 92% 1 or 8%
  • Although between 87% & 95% of the students in all the courses passed the written assignment with a score of 3 or better, the weakest response as was seen from Fall 2013 and then in Spring 2014 was still identified to be in the area of "Economy". Here, students either failed to respond to the concept of economy or they only gave a general explanation of the concept. Slight improvement is seen from the previous SY2012-2013, where the overall passing of students was at 70%. The improvement can be attributed to the implementation of the uniform attendance Policy for the SS division in Fall 2013.
  • PSLO#3: Despite which semester or course (SS200 or SS280), results indicate that the passing rate of students around 70%. Results for research papers show the following:

    Table 2 shows results of research papers for SS200 & SS280 for SY 2013-2014.
    Courses assessed for
    SY 2013-2014
    Total # of students Assessed #/% of students passed with a C or better #/% of students passed with a D or lower
    SS200-Research Methods 45 33 or 73% 12 or 27%
    SS280-Directed Study 31 22 or 71% 9 or 29%

    Figure 1 shows results of each criterion assessed for SS280 & SS200 research papers.

  • Results show that students performed better in Thesis formulation and Product/Process, which represents organization of the paper. Given that results reflect final paper only, it can be concluded that areas may have improved over the course of the drafts that students worked on in both courses. However, even at the final paper, students were still lacking in Analysis at a 58% and Documentation at 68%, which are failing scores. In response to this, it should be made a recommendation to focus on building critical thinking skills and on evaluating literature. The overall passing rate of students has slightly increased from 60% in SY 2012-2013 to a 70% for the SY 2013-2014.
  • PSLO#5: A total of 21 students in both Fall 2013 and Spring 2014 were given the exit survey questionnaire. Results have shown that in general, students are satisfied with the overall program.

What we are planning to work on:

  • Promote deep learning and cooperative learning by promoting group work, research projects, team debate, and other practices that prepare them to face real world activities.
  • Take proactive role in advising ensure that student enroll in the course have met the pre-requisites; make resources (e.g., computer lab) accessible and available.
  • Maintain uniform attendance policy
  • Reduce class size of Research Methods from 25 to 15 (starting Fall 2014) to build student-teacher interaction and careful evaluation of weak areas in research for students.

Recommendations for students:

  • Students have to pass with at least a C or better in EN 120a and EN110.
  • Students must have good reading and writing skills; critical and analytical skills to articulate ideas, concepts, and issues about Micronesia, both in written and oral communication.
  • Students must have research skills to write commendable papers in the upper level SS courses.
  • Students seek advice of the Micronesian Studies Program advisors in terms of course-planning.

Program Data Sheet
Spring 2014

Download PDF Version of the Data Sheet

Enrollment by Major and Campus

Major:

Degree

Term

Chuuk

Kosrae

National

Pohnpei

Yap

Students

Micronesian Studies

AA

Fall 2011

 

1

107

31

1

140

Micronesian Studies

AA

Fall 2012

 

5

99

19

3

126

Micronesian Studies

AA

Fall 2013

1

3

91

12

2

109

Micronesian Studies

AA

Spring 2011

 

3

105

12

1

121

Micronesian Studies

AA

Spring 2012

 

2

89

25

2

118

Micronesian Studies

AA

Spring 2013

 

2

91

9

2

104

Micronesian Studies

AA

Spring 2014

1

 

88

10

2

101



Credits by Major and Campus

Major:

Degree

Term

Chuuk

Kosrae

National

Pohnpei

Yap

Credits

Micronesian Studies

AA

Fall 2011

 

13

1394

365

12

1784

Micronesian Studies

AA

Fall 2012

 

61

1214

184

38

1497

Micronesian Studies

AA

Fall 2013

13

24

1138

117

20

1312

Micronesian Studies

AA

Spring 2011

 

37

1376

134.5

19

1566.5

Micronesian Studies

AA

Spring 2012

 

22

1171

302

27

1522

Micronesian Studies

AA

Spring 2013

 

18

1078

85

21

1202

Micronesian Studies

AA

Spring 2014

13

 

1049

88

22

1172



Credits by Program and Campus

Program

Term

Chuuk

Kosrae

National

Pohnpei

Yap

Credits

Micronesian Studies (AA)

Fall 2011

147

66

831

24

75

1143

Micronesian Studies (AA)

Fall 2012

180

48

834

30

 

1092

Micronesian Studies (AA)

Fall 2013

129

30

924

12

 

1095

Micronesian Studies (AA)

Spring 2011

90

39

735

12

66

942

Micronesian Studies (AA)

Spring 2012

222

27

627

27

 

903

Micronesian Studies(AA)

Spring 2013

171

60

828

27

 

1086

Micronesian Studies(AA)

Spring 2014

126

33

780

 

78

1017



Credits Enrolled, Attempted and Earned(averages)

Major

Degree

Term

CredEnrollAvg

CredAttAvg

CredEarnAvg

TermGPAAvg

Micronesian Studies

AA

Fall 2011

12.7

10.3

8.6

2.08

Micronesian Studies

AA

Fall 2012

11.9

10.3

8.3

2.15

Micronesian Studies

AA

Fall 2013

12.0

10.8

10.0

2.49

Micronesian Studies

AA

Spring 2011

12.9

11.3

9.4

2.2

Micronesian Studies

AA

Spring 2012

12.9

10.8

8.5

1.99

Micronesian Studies

AA

Spring 2013

11.6

10.1

8.1

1.98

Micronesian Studies

AA

Spring 2014

11.6

10.5

9.6

2.28



Program Sections, Enrollment Ratio and Average Class Size

Program

Term

Section

EnrollMax

Enrollment

EnrollRatio

AvgClassSize

Micronesian Studies (AA)

Fall 2011

16

400

366

91.5%

22.9

Micronesian Studies (AA)

Fall 2012

14

374

333

89.0%

23.8

Micronesian Studies (AA)

Fall 2013

17

396

347

87.6%

20.4

Micronesian Studies (AA)

Spring 2011

14

330

299

90.6%

21.4

Micronesian Studies (AA)

Spring 2012

13

319

282

88.4%

21.7

Micronesian Studies (AA)

Spring 2013

16

369

338

91.6%

21.1

Micronesian Studies (AA)

Spring 2014

17

387

340

87.9%

20.0



Persistence and Retention (new full time students)

Major Description

Degree

New Students FT 2011_3

Students 2012_1

Students 2012_3

Persistence Spring 2012

Retention Fall 2012

Micronesian Studies

AA

29

21

14

72.4%

48.3%


Major

Degree

New FT Fall 2012

Persisted Spring 2013

Retained Fall 2013

Persistence Spring 2013

Retention Fall 2013

Micronesian Studies

AA

12

13

12

108.3%

100.0%

Major

Degree

New FT Fall 2013

Persisted Spring 2015

Retained Fall 2014

Persistence Spring 2013

Retention Fall 2014

Micronesian Studies

AA

10

11

 

110.0%

0.0%



Course Completion & Withdrawals (Major)

Major

Degree

Term

Students

ABCorP%

ABCDorP%

W%

Micronesian Studies

AA

Fall 2011

502

65.9%

74.5%

10.4%

Micronesian Studies

AA

Fall 2012

581

62.5%

72.8%

9.3%

Micronesian Studies

AA

Fall 2013

440

75.2%

84.5%

5.7%

Micronesian Studies

AA

Spring 2011

538

66.7%

77.3%

10.2%

Micronesian Studies

AA

Spring 2012

516

60.3%

70.5%

14.0%

Micronesian Studies

AA

Spring 2013

413

64.9%

74.3%

11.6%

Micronesian Studies

AA

Spring 2014

383

70.2%

83.0%

8.6%



Course Completion & Withdrawals (Program)

Program

Term

Students

ABCorP%

ABCDorP%

W%

Micronesian Studies (AA)

Fall 2011

381

74.3%

85.6%

4.2%

Micronesian Studies (AA)

Fall 2012

364

74.5%

83.2%

8.5%

Micronesian Studies (AA)

Fall 2013

365

77.5%

84.9%

4.9%

Micronesian Studies (AA)

Spring 2011

314

79.0%

88.9%

5.1%

Micronesian Studies (AA)

Spring 2012

300

72.0%

79.3%

6.3%

Micronesian Studies (AA)

Spring 2013

362

71.5%

80.7%

6.6%

Micronesian Studies (AA)

Spring 2014

339

75.2%

85.0%

7.7%



Graduates

Major

Degree

AY2010/11

AY2011/12

AY2012/13

AY2013/14

Micronesian Studies

AA

33

20

21

 



Graduate Rates

Major

Degree

Cohort

New Full Students

Graduation Rate 100%

Graduation Rate 150%

Graduation Rate 200%

Micronesian Studies

AA

Fall 2008 FT

20

5%

40.0%

50.0%

Micronesian Studies

AA

Fall 2009 FT

19

15.8%

47.4%

73.7%

Micronesian Studies

AA

Fall 2010 FT

26

11.5%

23.1%

 

Micronesian Studies

AA

Fall 2011 FT

 

 

 

 

  • "Program" information is based on Dickerson's concept of a "program" as expending resoruces and is linked to courses owned by a program from TracDat
  • Graduation rates are based on Fall new students(full time) cohorts that are tracked at 100%, 150%, and 200%
  • Retention rates are based on Fall new students (full time) cohorts who return the following fall semester
  • Persistence rates are based on Fall new students (full time) cohorts who return the following spring semester

Program Review (National Campus)

AP Full Official:Micronesian Studies

Campus: National Campus

Completed by: Delihna Ehmes

AP Review Submission Date: March 28, 2014

AR Review Cycle: FALL 2012-Fall 2013

PROGRAM MISSION

Since 1999, the Micronesian Studies Program has been highly committed to preparing Micronesian students to become better-informed citizens by nurturing and enhancing their lifelong skills and understanding about their history, geography, government and politics, culture, and economy. In so doing, students will develop their personal values and become active participants and contributors to their societies.

  1. Program Goals

    Program goals are broad statements concerning knowledge, skills, or values that the faculty members expect the graduating students to achieve.

    • Students know the basic concepts of Micronesian history, society, government & politics, economy and culture.
    • Students understand the major theoretical approaches that explains political, economical, governmental, social, and cultural phenomenon of the Micronesian islands and other entities.
    • Students can write a critical paper about Micronesian issues using interpreted data collected through research.
    • Students have effective interpersonal skills in collecting and communicating course content of Micronesian studies.
    • Students value and respect their roles as citizens.
  2. Program History

    The Associate of Arts degree program in Liberal Arts was established in 1975 to enable students to transfer to a four-year college, university, or other institution. Other than the addition and establishment of more focused and area-specific liberal arts degrees such as the Liberal Arts/Media studies and the Liberal Arts/Education programs (adopted in 1997) or the Liberal Arts/HCOP [Health Careers Opportunities Program], there have been no major changes to the structure of the Liberal Arts program in the past 10 years. The program learning outcomes (above) for the L.A. Degree program were adopted in Spring 2005.

    The Micronesian Studies A.A. Degree Program was established in 1999 and had its first graduates in 2001. Since then, the program has had more than 100 students enrolled per semester and has ranked third in most enrolled Associate Degree at the College. From spring 2009 to summer 2011, in this period a total of 66 students have completed their AA in Micronesian Studies. Within the school year Fall 2011- Fall 2013, to the time of this report, 71 students have completed the program.

  3. Program Descriptions

    The program description describes the program, including its organization, relationship to other programs in the system, program design, degree(s) offered, and other significant features of the program, such as elements/resources for forward-looking new program contributions to the state’s economy, or specialized program accreditation.

    This program is designed to give students an in-depth knowledge and understanding of Micronesian history, society, government & politics, economy and culture. The A.A. degree prepares students to work in national or state government and politics, to be an elementary or high school social studies teacher, and in general to be more informed citizens of their state and nation. The program also has proven transferability to a wide range of majors at four-year colleges in the Pacific and the U.S. mainland.

  4. Program Admission Requirements

    This section describes the requirements for admission into the program and other requisites.

    To be matriculated into a program, applicants for admission must meet all of the following admission requirements:

    1. Have graduated or will graduate from high school at the end of the current year, or have a General Educational Development (GED) certificate.
    2. Have a minimum high school grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 as measured on a 4.0 scale, or a minimum score of 35 on each section and an average score of 45 for all five sections of the GED test.
    3. Be accepted by the College’s Committee on Recruitment, Admission, and Retention (RAR). As per the college catalog under admission to associate of arts programs.

  5. Program Certificate/Degree Requirements

    This section specifies the requirements for obtaining a certificate/degree in the program, including specific courses,, sequencing of courses, total credits, internships, practical, etc.

    General Education Core Requirements ..................29credits

    English (9 credits)

    • Mathematics (3 credits)
    • Any 100 level or above mathematics course
    • Natural Sciences (7 credits)
    • Social Sciences (3 credits)
    • SS 150 History of Micronesia (3)
    • Computer Applications (3 credits)
    • CA 100 Computer Literacy (3)
    • Exercise Sports Science course (1)
    • Humanities (3 credits)
    {Choose from any course in art, music, history, culture, literature, philosophy, or language (3)}

    Major Requirements................................................27 credits
    • SS101 Introduction to Political Science (3)
    • SS120 Introduction to Geography (3)
    • SS125 Geography of the Pacific Islands (3)
    • SS195 Micronesian Cultural Studies (3)
    • SS200 Research Methods (3)
    • SS205 Micronesian Government & Politics (3)
    • SS212 Economy of Micronesia (3)
    • SS220 Contemporary Issues in Micronesia (3)
    • SS280 Directed Studies (3)
    • Open Electives............................................6 Credits

      Total Program Credits...............................62 Credits

    MICRONESIAN STUDIES
    Suggested Schedule

    First Semester

    • EN 110 Advanced Reading...................................3
    • EN 120a Expository Writing I...............................3
    • MS 100 College Algebra.........................................3
    • SS 150 History of Micronesia.......................................3
    • CA 100 Computer Literacy..............................................3
    • 15 total credits

    Second Semester

    • EN 120b Expository Writig II................................3
    • SS101 Introduction to Political Science.................3
    • SS120 Introduction to Geography..........................3
    • Humanities Elective..........................................3
    • Science w/lab................................................4
    • 16 total credits

    Summer Session

    • SS2125 Geography of the Pacific..........3
    • Exercise Sports Science course .......................1
    • 4 total credits

    Third Semester

    • Non lab Science or Agriculture........................3
    • Open Elective.........................................3
    • SS 200 Research Methods..........................3
    • SS205 Micro. Government and Politics...............3
    • SS 195 Micronesian Cultural Studies..................3
    • 15 total credits

    Four Semester

    • Open Elective.........................................3
    • SS 212 Economy of Micronesia........................3
    • SS220 Contemporary Issues in Micronesia..........................3
    • SS 280 Directed Study: Selected Topics...............3
    • 12 total credits

    As per the College of Micronesia-FSM General Catalog 2013 - 2014 Associate of Arts Micronesian Studies Program.

  6. Program Courses and Enrollment

    This section lists courses offered in the program, including number of sections, course enrollment, section fill rates, and redundancy of courses across the institution.

    In addition to the standard General Education Core Requirements, Micronesian Studies Majors must take the following courses:

    1. SS101 Introduction to Political Science
    2. SS120 Introduction to Geography
    3. SS125 Geography of the Pacific Islands
    4. SS195 Micronesian Cultural Studies
    5. SS200 Research Methods
    6. SS205 Micronesian Government & Politics
    7. SS212 Economy of Micronesia
    8. SS220 Contemporary Issues in Micronesia
    9. SS280 Directed Studies

    2 open electives (100 level)
    These courses also support other Associate Degree programs.

  7. Program Faculty

    This section reports the faculty of the program, including full-time and part-time faculty. The degrees held and rank are provided for the full-time and part-time faculty. Finally, provide the faculty student ratio for the program.

    1. Mariana Ben Dereas, Full-time Professor,
      1. BA Political Science (University of Hawaii at Hilo)
      2. MA Pacific Islands Studies Program (University of Hawaii at Manoa)
    2. Lucia Donre-Sam, Full-time Professor (began Spring 2011)
      1. BA Sociology (University of Hawaii at Hilo)
      2. Masters in Educational Leadership (San Diego State University)
    3. Delihna Manuel Ehmes, Full-time Associate Professor,
      1. BS Psychology (Missouri Southern State University)
      2. MS Psychology (Capella University)
    4. John Richard Haglelgam, Full-time Regent Professor,
      1. BA Political Science (University of Hawaii at Manoa)
      2. MA Political Science (University of Hawaii at Manoa)
      3. Masters in Public Administration and Masters in Public Policy (Harvard University)
    5. Ringlen Ringlen, Full-time Professor
      1. BA in Business Administration and Economics (Graceland College)
      2. MS in Educational Counseling (University of Oregon)
    6. Faustino Yarofaisug, Full-time Associate Professor
      1. A Geography and Economics (University of South Pacific)
      2. Masters in Educational Leadership (San Diego State University)

    • These courses also support other Associate Degree programs.
    • Course enrollment.
      • Enrollment data include courses that are taken by students in other majors and reflects only National campus enrollment. Though SS150 is a general education requirement, it is the perquisite for all of the Micronesian Studies Courses above 200 levels thus is important to include with major requirements. SS120, SS125 and SS195 are offered as electives for other degree programs.

    Course Fall 2011 Spring 2012 Fall 2012 Spring 2013 Sum 2013 Fall 2013 Spring 2014 Sum 2011 Total
    SS101 Intro. to Political Science 29 30 30 54 n/a 57 48 29 236
    SS120 Intro. to Geography 54 55 53 58 24 50 56 83 439
    SS125 Geography of the Pacific Is. 59 27 25 28 18 49 25 n/a 161
    SS150 History of Micronesia 112 60 98 106 18 117 27 27 592
    SS195 Micronesian Cultural Stu 29 28 29 30 n/a 29 30 n/a 226
    SS200 Research Methods 27 29 18 22 n/a 25 25 n/a 109
    SS205 Micronesian Gov’t and Poli 25 n/a 25 16 7 25 25 24 127
    SS205 Micronesian Gov’t and Poli 25 n/a 25 16 7 25 25 24 127
    SS212 Economy of Micronesia 28 25 28 30 27 25 27 n/a 137
    SS220 Contem. Issues in Micro. 29 n/a 29 25 n/a 26 26 26 136
    SS280 Directed Studies 14 10 16 11 7 9 22 n/a 79
    Total Enrollment 406 264 351 380 101 412 311 189 2242
  8. Program Indicators

    This section provides the data for analyzing the extent to which the program has achieved the established outcomes and criteria. This is the most important part of the program review. The data that will be collected and evaluated are the following:

    A.Assessment of course student learning outcomes of program courses

    The course level assessment results were used and are derived from several tools of assessment as used in the courses. Results indicated below are retrieved from Course level assessments done for the indicated semesters. Tools of assessment included quizzes, unit tests, assignments, in-class work, and presentations. The passing rate indicates number of students with a grade C or better. Failing indicates students with D or lower and those withdrawn from the course.

    Table 2 shows results of courses as assessed by above mentioned assessment tools for Fall 2011.
    CourseNum Enrolled Pass Fail % passing for the course
    SS101 28 24 4 86%
    SS120 52 36 16 69%
    SS125 59 40 19 68%
    SS195 30 27 3 90%
    SS200 27 16 11 59%
    SS205 25 23 2 92%
    SS212 28 24 4 86%
    SS220 25 17 8 68%
    SS280 11 8 3 73%
    Table 3 shows results of courses as assessed by above mentioned assessment tools for Spring 2012.
    CourseNum Enrolled Pass Fail % passing for the course
    SS101 31 24 7 77%
    SS120 55 34 21 62%
    SS125 28 21 7 75%
    SS195 30 24 5 83%
    SS200 25 18 7 72%
    SS205 n/a n/a 2/a  
    SS212 25 17 8 68%
    SS220 3 3 0 100%
    SS280 20 12 8 67%
    Table 4 shows results of courses as assessed by above mentioned assessment tools for Fall 2012.
    CourseNum Enrolled Pass Fail % passing for the course
    SS101 60 56 4 93%
    SS120 52 34 18 72%
    SS125 25 18 9 72%
    SS195 29 26 3 90%
    SS200 27 14 13 52%
    SS205 25 18 7 72%
    SS212 25 16 9 64%
    SS220 28 21 9 75%
    SS280 16 10 6 63%
    Table 5 shows results of courses as assessed by above mentioned assessment tools for Spring 2013.
    CourseNum Enrolled Pass Fail % passing for the course
    SS101 54 37 17 69%
    SS120 56 34 22 61%
    SS125 28 20 8 71%
    SS195 30 27 3 90%
    SS200 24 14 10 58%
    SS205 15 14 1 93%
    SS212 28 18 10 64%
    SS220 26 19 7 73%
    SS280 15 9 6 60%
    Table 6 shows results of courses as assessed by above mentioned assessment tools for Fall 2013.
    CourseNum Enrolled Pass Fail % passing for the course
    SS101 57 50 7 88%
    SS120 54 35 19 65%
    SS125 54 39 15 72%
    SS195 29 26 3 90%
    SS200 28 20 8 71%
    SS205 27 19 8 70%
    SS212 27 22 5 81%
    SS220 27 25 2 93%
    SS280 9 6 3 67%

    Across major courses, it should be noted that percentage of passing was lowest for SS120 Introduction to Geography, where percentage of students passing was between 61% to 69% (as seen across each semester). Second the lowest was SS200 Research Methods, where for the class across each semester was between 50%-71%. Performance may have been lower for the courses due to their large class size and the fact that students are just being introduced to new concepts. Performance seem to be best for the upper 200+ courses and a possible explanation is that students are already familiar with major concepts in the course and program. Thus, they can easily relate.

    It should also be mentioned that across the semester, performance was best for Fall 2013 for all courses in the program and this can be explained by the idea that a uniform attendance policy for the division was implemented during this semester.

    B. Assessment of Program Student Learning Outcomes

    At the beginning of Fall Semester 2012, first, during the national campus faculty workshop and second, during the Division meeting in the same week, Division faculty reviewed the 2011-2012 school year assessment report, and crafted the school year Division Assessment Plan. One important lesson learned during the discussion was that many of the staff came to understand the assessment process and the important information that the assessment can provide them. That is, assessment can bring to light about student’s learning needs (styles of learning), student’s performance (level of student’s readiness to do college level work), and provide a reflection about the quality and effectiveness of the delivery of student learning (instruction). Division faculty believed that this information is significant to know so strategies can be developed to improve student learning in the Program.

    This lesson led to the recommendation for the Division to repeat the same assessment activity that they did for the previous school year. As a result, Program Courses (SS195, SS200, SS212, SS220, and SS280) were administered the evaluation question in the form of a common essay, where the essays were using a scoring rubric. At the classroom level, each faculty members are required to administer their own assessment and to assess student learning in their classes. The assessment question was: "List and explain the social changes that have occurred in Micronesia and their impact (both advantages and disadvantages) on the social, political, and economic aspects."

    *It should also be noted that the program assessment results reflect courses offered at the national campus.

    WHAT WE LOOKED AT:

    The Micronesian Studies Program assessment focused on PSLOs 1, 3, and 5. PSLO 1was assessed on a common essay, with a scoring rubric developed by the Micronesian Studies faculty. PSLO 3 was assessed by research papers, with a scoring rubric collected in the courses. PSLO 5 was assessed, using an exit survey questionnaire. Listed below are the results for each of the PSLOs.

    What we found:

    • PSLO#1: Courses assessed were SS195-Micronesian Cultural Studies, SS205-Micronessian government & Politics, SS212-Economy of Micronesia, SS220-Contemporary issues in Micronesia, and SS 280-Directed Study. The following was found:
      • SS195:
        • N=42
        • Pass=34 or 81% of the students passed with a grade c or better.
        • Fail=8
      • SS205:
        • N=24
        • Pass=21 or 88% of the students passed with a grade C or better.
        • Fail=3
      • SS212:
        • N=42
        • Pass=33 or 79% of the students passed with a grade C or better.
        • Fail=9
      • SS220:
        • N=31
        • Pass=24 or 77% of the students passed with a grade C or better.
        • Fail 7
      • SS280:
        • N=17
        • Pass=16 or 94% of the students passed with a grade C or better.
        • Fail=1
      • The overall passing rate was higher for the SS 200+-level courses. The number of students who passed the essay was highest for SS220. A possible explanation can be said that the classes are usually small. Thus, allowing more student-interaction and easier classroom management. Another explanation pointed towards the fact that these are capstone courses where students take after all other major required courses have been completed. These results are based on a common essay administered to the above-mentioned courses.

    • PSLO#3: Despite which semester or course (SS200 or SS280), results indicate that the passing rate of students around 60%. Results for research papers show the following:
      • SS195:
        • N=52
        • Pass=35 or 67% of the students passed with a grade c or better.
        • Fail=17
      • SS280:
        • N=31
        • Pass=20 or 64% of the students passed with a grade C or better.
        • Fail=11
    • PSLO#5: A total of 21 students in both Fall 2012 and Spring 2013 were given the exit survey questionnaire. Results have shown that in general, students are satisfied with the overall program. Few feel that advisors availability should be improved and 5 students from both semesters expressed the need for more instructors and course within the program. As shown earlier in performance of students by class, results are indicative of the need to additional instructor for the program. It is again a possible explanation that part of why students in the program express little satisfaction for advisor availability is that there is currently about 90+ students in the program and few instructors to address every need of each student. Results are based on an exit survey questionnaire administered to graduating students.

    C. Program enrollment (historical enrollment patterns, student credits by major)

    Enrollment rate for Micronesian Studies Program for the school year 2012-2013. The figures in table 7 reflect students enrolled in the program from four (4) campuses.

    Table 7 shows credits by major and campus for Micronesian Studies in Comparison to two other higher-ranking programs (CIS & LA/HCOP) at this College.
    Micronesian Studies Credits by major and Campus

    Term

    Chuuk

    Kosrae

    National

    Pohnpei

    Yap

    Credits

    Fall 2012

     

    61

    1214

    184

    38

    1497

    Fall 2013

    13

    24

    1138

    117

    20

    1312

    Spring 2012

    22

    1171

    302

    27

    20

    1522

    Spring 2013

     

    18

    1078

    85

    21

    1202

    CIS Credits by major and Campus

    Term

    Chuuk

    Kosrae

    National

    Pohnpei

    Yap

    Credits

    Fall 2012

     

    39

    1808

    218

    337.5

    2478.5

    Fall 2013

    14

    36

    1884

    92

    171

    1987

    Spring 2012

     

    54

    1695

    207

    209

    2168

    Spring 2013

     

    6

    1741

    124

    224

    2103

    HCOP Credits by major and Campus

    Term

    Chuuk

    Kosrae

    National

    Pohnpei

    Yap

    Credits

    Fall 2012

     

    82

    1412

    172

    147

    1813

    Fall 2013

    13

    72

    1387

    129

    132

    1733

    Spring 2012

     

    21

    1106

    76

    122

    1325

    Spring 2013

     

    69

    1280

    89

    139

    1577

    Table 8: Credits earned, attempted, and earned (average) by term and Campus

    Term

    Enrolled Avg.

    Attempted Avg.

    Earned Avg.

    Fall 2012

    11.9

    10.3

    8.3

    Fall 2013

    12.0

    10.8

    10.0

    Spring 2012

    12.9

    10.8

    8.5

    Spring 2013

    11.6

    10.1

    8.1

    D. Average Class Size

    Table 9 <

    Courses

    Average Class Size

    SS101 Intro. to Political Science

    30

    SS120 Intro. to Geographyp

    27

    SS125 Geography of the Pacific Is.

    27

    SS150 History of Micronesia

    30

    SS195 Micronesian Cultural Studies

    29

    SS200 Research Methods

    22

    SS205 Micronesian Gov't and Poli

    25

    SS212 Economy of Micronesia

    27

    SS220 Contem. Issues in Micro.

    23

    SS280 Directed Studies

    15

    Total Average

    29

    E. Course completion rate

    Table 10 Course completion for Fall 2011

    Subject

    Course Number

    Enrolled

    ABC or P%

    ABCD or P%

    %ABC or P

    %ABCD or P

    SS

    101

    28

    24

    27

    85.7%

    96.4%

    SS

    120

    52

    36

    39

    69.2%

    75.0%

    SS

    125

    59

    40

    44

    67.8%

    74.6%

    SS

    195

    30

    27

    27

    90.0%

    90.0%

    SS

    200

    27

    16

    24

    59.3%

    88.9%

    SS

    205

    25

    23

    23

    92.0%

    92.0%

    SS

    212

    28

    24

    25

    85.7%

    89.3%

    SS

    220

    25

    17

    19

    68.0%

    76.0%

    SS

    280

    25

    17

    19

    68.0%

    76.0%

    Table 11 Spring 2012 course completion rate:

    Subject

    CourseNum

    ABCP

    ABCDP

    ComRABCP

    ComRABCDP

    SS

    101

    42

    51

    67.7%

    82.3%

    SS

    120

    95

    122

    67.4%

    86.5%

    SS

    125

    25

    26

    80.6%

    83.9%

    SS

    150

    223

    245

    75.6%

    83.4%

    SS

    195

    28

    30

    90.3%

    96.8%

    SS

    200

    18

    21

    75.0%

    87.5%

    SS

    205

    28

    28

    96.6%

    96.6%

    SS

    212

    22

    22

    78.6%

    78.6%

    SS

    220

    24

    24

    82.8%

    82.8%

    SS

    280

    13

    16

    72.2%

    88.9%

    Table 12 Course completion for Fall 2012

    Subject

    Course Number

    Enrolled

    ABC or P%

    ABCD or P%

    %ABC or P

    %ABCD or P

    SS

    101

    60

    56

    56

    93.3%

    93.3%

    SS

    120

    52

    34

    35

    65.4%

    67.3%

    SS

    125

    25

    18

    18

    72.0%

    72.0%

    SS

    195

    29

    26

    26

    89.7%

    89.7%

    SS

    200

    27

    14

    22

    51.9%

    81.5%

    SS

    205

    25

    18

    20

    72.0%

    80.0%

    SS

    212

    25

    16

    20

    64.0%

    80.0%

    SS

    220

    28

    21

    24

    75.0%

    85.7%

    SS

    280

    16

    10

    11

    62.5%

    68.8%

    Table 13 Spring 2013 course completion rate:

    Subject

    CourseNum

    ABCP

    ABCDP

    ComRABCP

    ComRABCDP

    SS

    101

    42

    51

    67.7%

    82.3%

    SS

    120

    95

    122

    67.4%

    86.5%

    SS

    125

    25

    26

    80.6%

    83.9%

    SS

    150

    223

    245

    75.6%

    83.4%

    SS

    195

    28

    30

    90.3%

    96.8%

    SS

    200

    18

    21

    75.0%

    87.5%

    SS

    205

    28

    28

    96.6%

    96.6%

    SS

    212

    22

    22

    78.6%

    78.6%

    SS

    220

    24

    24

    82.8%

    82.8%

    SS

    280

    13

    16

    72.2%

    88.9%

    Table14 Course completion for Fall 2013

    Subject

    Course Number

    Enrolled

    ABC or P%

    ABCD or P%

    %ABC or P

    %ABCD or P

    SS

    101

    60

    56

    56

    93.3%

    93.3%

    SS

    120

    52

    34

    35

    65.4%

    67.3%

    SS

    125

    25

    18

    18

    72.0%

    72.0%

    SS

    195

    29

    26

    26

    89.7%

    89.7%

    SS

    200

    27

    14

    22

    51.9%

    81.5%

    SS

    205

    25

    18

    20

    72.0%

    80.0%

    SS

    212

    25

    16

    20

    64.0%

    80.0%

    SS

    220

    28

    21

    24

    75.0%

    85.7%

    SS

    280

    16

    10

    11

    62.5%

    68.8%

    Table 15 shows Program completion by semester

    By Semester

    Students

    ABC or P%

    ABCD or P%

    W

    Fall 2011

    381

    74.3%

    85.6%

    4.2

    Fall 2012

    364

    74.5%

    83.2%

    8.5

    Fall 2013

    365

    77.4%

    84.9%

    4.9

    Spring 2012

    300

    72%

    79.3%

    6.3

    Spring 2013

    362

    71.5%

    83.7%

    6.6

    F. Student retention rate (Fall-to-Fall for two-year programs; Fall-to-Spring for one-year programs)

    Table 16 indicates retention rate for the Micronesian Studies Program for semesters indicated below.

    Fall 2011-Spring 2012

    Retained 84% of the 140 students who enrolled in 2011

    Fall 2011-Spring 2012

    Retained 84% of the 140 students who enrolled in 2011

    G. Student persistence rate (semester to semester)

    Table 17 indicates persistence & retention rates from Fall to Fall semesters, including Micronesian Studies Program and two other higher-ranking programs (CIS &LA/HCOP) at the College to rate the retention and persistence of Micronesian Studies Students.
    Micronesian Studies: Persistence and Retention (New full time students)

    New FT Fall 2012

    Persisted Spring 2013

    Retained Fall 2013

    Persistence Spring 2013

    Retention Fall 2013

    12

    13

    12

    108.3%

    100%

    CIS: Persistence and Retention (New full time students)

    New FT Fall 2012

    Persisted Spring 2013

    Retained Fall 2013

    Persistence Spring 2013

    Retention Fall 2013

    43

    37

    24

    86.0%

    55.8%

    LA/HCOP: Persistence and Retention (New full time students)

    New FT Fall 2012

    Persisted Spring 2013

    Retained Fall 2013

    Persistence Spring 2013

    Retention Fall 2013

    38

    35

    35

    92.1%

    92.1%

    It can be said from Table 17 that new enrollment for the program is half compared to the two other programs (CIS and LA/HCOP). However, in terms of retention and persistence, the Micronesian Studies Program does better than the other two, as it has retained 100% of its enrollees, compared to CIS with 55.8% and LA/HCOP with 92.1%. Additionally, 108.3% of its students have persisted compared to the 86.0% of CIS and 92.1% of LA/HCOP.

    Note: Data retrieved from IRPO.

    H. Success rates on licensing or certification exams (CTE, TP, Nursing, etc)

    -None


    I. Graduation rate based on yearly number

    Table 18 reflects data compiled list from IRPO that was used to assess employer’s satisfaction.

    Year

    Graduation

    2011

    29

    2012

    18

    2013

    14

    J. Students seat cost

    -IRPO

    K. Cost of duplicate or redundant courses, programs or services

    -None

    L. Revenue generated by program – tuition (program allocated), grant income.

    Micronesian Studies Credits by major and Campus

    Term

    Chuuk

    Kosrae

    National

    Pohnpei

    Yap

    Credit

    Revenue by Program

    Fall 2012

     

    61

    1214

    184

    38

    1497

    $157,185

    Fall 2013

    13

    24

    1138

    117

    20

    1312

    $137,760

    Spring 2012

     

    22

    1171

    302

    27

    1522

    $159,810

    Spring 2012

     

    18

    1078

    85

    21

    1202

    $126,210

    Total Revenue earned by the Program

    $580,965

    It should be noted that $483,105 or 83.16% of the revenue made by this Program is brought in by the National Campus alone, compared to its $146, 887 5-member faculty salary for the FY 2015.

    M. Students' satisfaction rate

    -IRPO

    N. Alumni data

    A compiled list of graduates from IRPO was used to track the students. The faculty in the program could only track a certain number of students who have graduated from the program. The data here are reported with the understanding that the tools may not be reliable. However, they are the only mechanisms for tracking the students. The data are retrieved from email communications, group network on facebook, and an exit survey administered to students in the program in their final semester at the College. The rate reflects students who have transferred to other higher institutions and those working in both private and public sectors.

    Table 19 indicates rate of transfer to both higher education institutions and employers from 2012-2013.

    Numbers of Student

    Transfer

    16

    SDSU-BA in Criminal Justice/Trial Counselor

    13

    UOG

    2

    BA Education-UOG

    16

    UH-Hilo

    2

    UH-Mano

    5

    3rd Year Education COM-FSM

    2

    Chaminade University

    9

    Employed (private and public)

    O. Employment data and employer feedback (employer surver)

    To be populated by IRPO

    P. Program added or cancelled at nearby regional institutions (PCC, GCC, Hawaii schools, UOG, CMI, NMC)

    As can be seen from Tables 17 and 18, the highest number of students who finish the program have transferred to University of Guam (UOG), with 13 students and UH Hilo, with 16 students. Since the recent establishment of the online Bachelors Program from San Diego State University (SDSU) in January 2014, 16 students have made a transition from the Trial Counselor’s Program to SDSU, all of which are graduates of the Micronesian Studies Program. The 16 who are currently in the SDSU program make up the larger portion of the first-ever cohort that started early January.

    Q. Transfer rate

    Note on Table 17

    Table 20 indicates rate of transfer to both higher education institutions and employers 2012-2013.

    Numbers of Student

    Transfer

    16

    SDSU-BA in Criminal Justice/Trial Counselor

    13

    UOG

    2

    BA Education-UOG

    16

    UH-Hilo

    2

    UH-Mano

    5

    3rd Year Education COM-FSM

    2

    Chaminade University

    9

    Employed (private and public)

  9. Analysis

    Findings
    This section provides discussion of information discovered as a result of the evaluation such as problems or concerns with the program and what part of the program is working well and meeting expectation.

    Generally, the program is efficient at this rate compared to two other high-ranking programs at the college as can be seen in Tables 7 & 17,in terms of enrollment and retention. However, there is still room for improvement and such can be addressed if course results are observed individually.

    • It has been observed that students lack the reading and writing skills in both research courses, indicated in Program Assessment results.
    • Overall, students seem to be stronger in organization but weak in analysis and synthesis aspects of their research papers for both courses.
    • Although not factored into this data-collection, instructors have detected a relationship between students’ attendance and performance. It has been repeatedly observed that students who have excess absences either fail the research-paper or end up withdrawing from the course. Results seen in PLA’s and CLA’s.
    • Completion rate appears lower for courses in large sizes.

    Recommendations
    This section provides recommendations from the program on what to do to improve or enhance the quality of program and course learning outcomes as well as program goals and objectives. This section should also include suggestions that describe how the program might be able to create opportunities for a better program in the future. Some examples are exploring alternate delivery mechanisms, forming external partnerships, or realigning with other programs.

    • Reduce class size from 25 to 20 during regular semester and from 20 to15 during the summer.
    • Implementation of a uniform attendance policy for all courses beginning fall 2013.
    • Promote deep learning and cooperative learning by promoting group work, research projects, team debate, and other practices that prepare them to face real world activities.
    • Enriching the delivery mode of instruction by utilizing videos, PowerPoint, and other visual modes that will stimulate student interest in the subject.
    • Diversifying methods of assessing student learning and experience. Where available, instructor to enrich and promote interest in the class by utilizing visual presentations and also diversify tools in measuring the SLOs by giving students opportunities for deep learning and cooperative learning through take-home assignment, and group work.
    • Taking proactive role in advising ensure that student enroll in the course have met the pre-requisites; make resources (e.g., computer lab) accessible and available.
    • Persistent is seeking administration support for additional instructor. Results have shown that in general, students are satisfied with the overall program. Few feel that advisors availability should be improved and 5 students from both semesters expressed the need for more instructors and course within the program. As shown earlier in performance of students by class, results are indicative of the need to additional instructor for the program. It is again a possible explanation that part of why students in the program express little satisfaction for advisor availability is that there is currently about 90+ students in the program and few instructors to address every need of each student.

    Form is newly revised. Previous Program Reviews are available at
    http://wiki.comfsm.fm/Academic_Programs
    Micronesian Studies is a very good example. Program review checklist is on the next page.

Unit Assessment Report

Report Period: 2013-2014

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