Micronesian Studies Program

Program Student Learning Outcomes Assessment (AY 2012-2013)

Program Student Learning Outcomes(PSLOS)

At the completion of Micronesian Studies Program, the student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate the ability to read, speak and write critically and effectively in English about Micronesian Studies Program course content.
  2. Demonstrate proficiency in the geographical, historical, and cultural literacy of the Micronesian region.
  3. Demonstrate proficient knowledge of the structure and functions of the government and social, political, and economic issues concerning the Micronesian Studies course content.
  4. Demonstrate the ability to perform research and write papers relevant to Micronesia using different methods and technologies.
  5. Demonstrate an appreciation of the requirements of good citizenship in the FSM.
  • I=Introduced
  • D=Demonstrated
  • M=Mastery at a level appropriate for graduation


  • PSLO Assessment Report Summary


    What we looked at:

    The Micronesian Studies Program assessment focused on PSLOs 1, 3, and 5. PSLO 1was assessed on a common essay, with a scoring rubric developed the Micronesian Studies faculty. PSLO 3 was assessed by research papers, with a scoring rubric collected in the courses. PSLO 5 was assessed, using an exit survey questionnaire. Listed below are the results for each of the PSLOs.

    What we found:

    • PSLO#1: PSLO#1: Courses assessed were SS195-Micronesian Cultural Studies, SS205-Micronessian government & Politics, SS212-Economy of Micronesia, SS220-Contemporary issues in Micronesia, and SS 280-Directed Study. The following was found:

      SS195: N=42
      Pass=34
      Fail=8

      SS205: N=24
      Pass=21
      Fail=3

      SS212: N=42
      Pass=33
      Fail=9

      SS220: N=31
      Pass=24
      Fail=7

      SS280: N=17
      Pass=16
      Fail=1

      The overall passing rate was higher for the SS 200+-level courses. The number of students who passed the essay was highest for SS220. A possible explanation can be said that the classes are usually small. Thus, allowing more student-interaction and easier classroom management. Another explanation pointed towards the fact that these are capstone courses where students take after all other major required courses have been completed. These results are based on a common essay administered to the above-mentioned courses.

    • PSLO#3: Despite which semester or course (SS200 or SS280), results indicate that the passing rate of students around 60%. Results for research papers show the following:

      SS200: N=52
      Pass=35
      Fail=17

      SS200: N=31
      Pass=20
      Fail=11

      It has been observed that students lack the reading and writing skills in both research courses. Overall, students seem to be stronger in organization but weak in coherence. Although not factored into this data-collection, instructors have detected a relationship between students’ attendance and performance. It has been repeatedly observed that students who have excess absences either fail the research-paper or end up withdrawing from the course. Another factor that determines the outcome of the performance can also be attributed to the class size, which is especially true for SS200.

    • PSLO#5: A total of 21 students in both Fall 2012 and Spring 2013 were given the exit survey questionnaire. Results have shown that in general, students are satisfied with the overall program. Few feel that advisors availability should be improved and 5 students from both semesters expressed the need for more instructors and course within the program. As shown earlier in performance of students by class, results are indicative of the need to additional instructor for the program. It is again a possible explanation that part of why students in the program express little satisfaction for advisor availability is that there is currently about 90+ students in the program and few instructors to address every need of each student. Results also show that when assessing this outcome with research papers in courses SS200 and SS280, the passing rate was at 60%. A possible explanation to this result can be said to include student's poor attendance and the class size.

    What we are planning to work on:

    Is to increase student success through:

    • Reduce class size from 25 to 20 during regular semester and from 20 to15 during the summer.
    • Implementation of a uniform attendance policy for all courses beginning fall 2013.
    • Promote deep learning and cooperative learning by promoting group work, research projects, team debate, and other practices that prepare them to face real world activities.
    • Enriching the delivery mode of instruction by utilizing videos, PowerPoint, and other visual modes that will stimulate student interest in the subject.
    • Diversifying methods of assessing student learning and experience. Where available, instructor to enrich and promote interest in the class by utilizing visual presentations and also diversify tools in measuring the SLOs by giving students opportunities for deep learning and cooperative learning through take-home assignment, and group work. At the moment, the division only has one laptop for instructors (both the trial counselors and Micronesian Studies).
    • Taking proactive role in advising ensure that student enroll in the course have met the pre-requisites; make resources (e.g., computer lab) accessible and available.
    • Persistent is seeking administration support for additional instructor. Results have shown that in general, students are satisfied with the overall program. Few feel that advisors availability should be improved and 5 students from both semesters expressed the need for more instructors and course within the program. As shown earlier in performance of students by class, results are indicative of the need to additional instructor for the program. It is again a possible explanation that part of why students in the program express little satisfaction for advisor availability is that there is currently about 90+ students in the program and few instructors to address every need of each student.

    Recommendations for students:

    • Students have to pass with at least a C or better in EN 120a and EN110.
    • Students must have good reading and writing skills; critical and analytical skills to articulate ideas, concepts, and issues about Micronesia, both in written and oral communication.
    • Students must have research skills to write commendable papers in the upper level SS courses.
    • Students seek advice of the Micronesian Studies Program advisors in terms of course-planning.

    Program Data Sheet Spring 2014
    Program Data Sheet Spring 2013

    Program Review (National Campus) 2012-2013

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