Business Administration

  • PSLO
  • Data Sheet
  • Program Review
  • Assessment Report

Program Student Learning Outcomes Assessment
(AY 2014-2015)

Program Student Learning Outcomes(PSLOs)

At the completion of Business Administration Program, the student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate basic knowledge of each of the functional areas of business – accounting, management, marketing, economics, and finance – by emphasizing their importance in an organization and describing their interrelationship in the organization’s attempt to achieve its objectives.
  2. Demonstrate basic knowledge and skill in the use of cost and managerial accounting concepts and techniques as management tools for planning, controlling, evaluating performance and making decisions.
  3. Demonstrate basic knowledge and skill in business mathematics and elementary statistics by accurately performing common business computations, statistical data presentation and analysis.
  4. Demonstrate basic knowledge and skill in intercultural writing and speaking appropriate for business.
  5. Demonstrate a basic understanding of the legal environment and ethical challenges confronting business in general and in the FSM, from both local and global perspectives.

PSLO Assessment Report Summary

Looking Back:

During assessment cycle 2013-2014, the Business Administration Program assessed PSLO 1. The division discussed a collaborative assessment activity to measure student’s basic knowledge in the fundamental areas of business. The plan, however, did not materialize because it coincided with the program review that took up much of faculty time. Instead of using the collaborative activity to assess PLSO 1, assessments were done at the course level. So in 2014-2015 assessment cycle, the division met and discussed improvement plans to make sure the collaborative assessment activity was successfully implemented. In early January the faculty met again to prepare a mapping document that specified how the PSLOs would be met at the course level. The document indicated who was in charge, and when each assessment strategy would be carried out.

What we looked at:

In addition to PSLO 1, we also assessed PSLO 3, and PSLO 5.

The collaborative activity used to assess PLSO 1 required students to perform the skills they learned from management, marketing, economics, finance, and accounting. The BU101 and BU260 students were required to come up with a simple business plan, the BU270 students were required to come up with a marketing plan, while students of EC220 were asked to collect data needed to record the transactions and prepare the basic financial statements. The success of the collaboration between the students emphasized the importance of each course in the organization and how their interrelationship is important in the achieving the organization’s objectives.

Assessment results from BU250 class and BU/MS110 were used to assess PLSO 3. Students under the BU/MS110 class were asked to do a pricing activity while the students under BU250 were asked to collect the receipts from any group during the collaborative activity and produce a cash flow statement from the receipts collected. The average score the students got on the rubrics was used to assess the PLSO.

The assessment results of the reporting activities under the BU271 class were used to assess PSLO 5. Two reports were required from the students. The first report covered topics on the FSM constitution while the second report covered concepts on the law of contracts and negotiable instruments. A rubric was used to measure student performance on the report.

What we found:

PSLO 1

Enrollment by Major and Campus

CSLO

Did not meet expectations

Meet Expectations

Exceeded Expectations

Total

BU101

12.0%

50.0%

38.0%

100%

BU250

 

87.5%

12.5%

100%

BU271

 

70.0%

30.0%

100%

EC220

25.0%

75.0%

 

100%

AC220

20.0%

80.0%

 

100%

The results from the rubrics show that among the fundamental areas of business for which the students were assessed, three courses have percentages of students who did meet the expectation.

Twelve percent of the BU101 students assessed did not meet our expectation in demonstrating their basic knowledge in management because some members of their group who were assigned vital tasks did not show up on the day of the activity forcing the other members to take emergency measures that were not in the plan. This affected their accomplishment of the expected outcome. Twenty five percent of the students did not demonstrate their basic skills in economics because they failed to identify costs and profit terms in their computation of economic profit. They also found it difficult to identify their implicit costs, which made their computation of economic profit incorrect. Finally, 20.0% of the students from the accounting did not demonstrate their basic skills in accounting because most or all of the source documents are incorrectly analyzed and not neatly filed. The students’ ability to meet this outcome was seriously hampered by quality of documents collected from selected participating groups.

The result of the collaborative assessment activity show that 88.6% of the students were successful at demonstrating their basic knowledge of each of the functional areas of business – accounting, management, marketing, economics, and finance – by emphasizing their importance in an organization and describing their interrelationship in the organization’s attempt to achieve its objectives.

PSLO 3

The results of the pricing and cash flow assessment activities show that 85% percent of the students were successful at demonstrating basic knowledge and skill in business mathematics and elementary statistics by accurately performing common business computations, statistical data presentation and analysis.

PSLO 5

The results of the reporting activity show that 100% of the students were successful in demonstrating their basic understanding of the legal environment and ethical challenges confronting business in general and in the FSM, from both local and global perspectives.

What we are planning to work on:

PSLO 1

Planning

  • Inform students about the activity during the first two weeks to give an idea of their responsibilities.
  • Post a countdown at the Business Administration office door to remind faculty and students of the due date of each activity.
  • Communicate the date of the event to IDAP to include in the calendar of activities.

Management

  • Improve collaboration between students.
  • Implement control functions to make sure the students are on schedule on the tasks given to them.

Closing Gaps

  • Explain the significance of the activity to the students. Share the rubrics and explain how the rubrics will be used to assess each student’s work.
  • Give a clear explanation of why students are doing the collaborative activity and what is expected from them.
  • Ask student feedback on how to better improve the collaborative assessment activity.
  • Use assessment results from the BU250 class only.

PSLO 3

  • Conduct reviews on concepts in algebra to prepare students for the application of these concepts to statistics, economics, and finance. Give more practice activities and give at least one authentic assessment in each course that measures the math skills of students.

PSLO 5

  • Alternative Learning activity. Students will attend one of the hearings either in the FSM or State court and write a report about what they have learned from the experience.
  • Group activity- Students will conduct an interview with one of their congressmen or senators and gather information about the functions and powers of congress or senate, how a bill becomes a law, any bill that a congressman or senator being interviewed has written or that became a law, recent laws/ statutes in the FSM and/ or any issues/ challenges facing the House of Representatives or the Senate.

Recommendations for students:

PLO 1

  • Get involved early in the process by coordinating with the groups that they have identified to be associated with, so that they will be in a position to make suggestions to the group in matters involving accounting.
  • Encourage students to sell products other than food.

PLO 3

  • Review on concepts learned in algebra before taking the class.
  • Rely less on calculators when making simple mathematical operations.

PLO 5

  • Read articles on issues on the laws of FSM.
  • Be creative in looking for references.


Program Data Sheet
Spring 2014

Download PDF Version of the Data Sheet

Enrollment by Major and Campus

Major:

Degree

Term

Chuuk

Kosrae

National

Pohnpei

Yap

Students

Business Administration

AS

Fall 2011

46

17

148

42

20

273

Business Administration

AS

Fall 2012

35

15

147

27

16

240

Business Administration

AS

Fall 2013

28

11

144

18

19

220

Business Administration

AS

Spring 2012

37

16

123

33

23

232

Business Administration

AS

Spring 2013

25

6

127

17

11

186

Business Administration

AS

Spring 2014

23

4

132

18

15

192



Credits by Major and Campus

Major:

Degree

Term

Chuuk

Kosrae

National

Pohnpei

Yap

Credits

Business Administration

AS

Fall 2011

581

179

1874

521

220

3375

Business Administration

AS

Fall 2012

407

154

1792

282

168

2803

Business Administration

AS

Fall 2013

347

105

1784

196

212

2644

Business Administration

AS

Spring 2011

140

90

1742.5

261

169

2402.5

Business Administration

AS

Spring 2012

477

147

1534

349

249

2756

Business Administration

AS

Spring 2013

290

34

1647

186

141

2298

Business Administration

AS

Spring 2014

278

35

1609

188

171

2281



Credits by Program and Campus

Program

Term

Chuuk

Kosrae

National

Pohnpei

Yap

Credits

Business Administration (AS)

Fall 2011

114

 

1032

83

 

1229

Business Administration (AS)

Fall 2012

55

 

1058

109

 

1222

Business Administration (AS)

Fall 2013

74

 

1013

80

 

1167

Business Administration (AS)

Spring 2011

27

 

1106

39

 

1172

Business Administration (AS)

Spring 2012

112

9

979

90

 

1190

Business Administration (AS)

Spring 2013

21

 

1048

101

 

1170

Business Administration (AS)

Spring 2014

71

 

1079

76

 

1226



Credits Enrolled, Attempted and Earned(averages)

Major

Degree

Term

CredEnrollAvg

CredAttAvg

CredEarnAvg

TermGPAAvg

Business Administration

AS

Fall 2011

12.4

10.5

8.7

2.31

Business Administration

AS

Fall 2012

11.7

10.5

8.3

2.07

Business Administration

AS

Fall 2013

12.0

10.6

9.3

2.34

Business Administration

AS

Spring 2011

12.6

11.1

9.3

2.33

Business Administration

AS

Spring 2012

11.9

10.3

8.5

2.10

Business Administration

AS

Spring 2013

12.4

10.4

8.3

1.89

Business Administration

AS

Spring 2014

11.9

10.2

8.8

2.15



Program Sections, Enrollment Ratio and Average Class Size

Program

Term

Section

EnrollMax

Enrollment

EnrollRatio

AvgClassSize

Business Administration (AS)

Fall 2011

16

403

355

88.1%

22.2

Business Administration (AS)

Fall 2012

17

419

363

86.6%

21.4

Business Administration (AS)

Fall 2013

17

409

348

85.1%

20.5

Business Administration (AS)

Spring 2011

15

383

327

85.4%

21.8

Business Administration (AS)

Spring 2012

16

390

322

82.6%

20.1

Business Administration (AS)

Spring 2013

17

390

316

81.0%

18.6

Business Administration (AS)

Spring 2014

18

428

379

88.6%

21.1



Persistence and Retention (new full time students)

Major Description

Degree

New Students FT 2011_3

Students 2012_1

Students 2012_3

Persistence Spring 2012

Retention Fall 2012

Business Administration

AS

72

59

40

81.9%

55.6%


Major

Degree

New FT Fall 2012

Persisted Spring 2013

Retained Fall 2013

Persistence Spring 2013

Retention Fall 2013

Business Administration

AS

40

35

30

81.9%

55.6%

Major

Degree

New FT Fall 2013

Persisted Spring 2014

Retained Fall 2014

Persistence Spring 2014

Retention Fall 2014

Business Administration

AS

34

32

 

94.1%

0.0%



Course Completion & Withdrawals (Major)

Major

Degree

Term

Students

ABCorP%

ABCDorP%

W%

Business Administration

AS

Fall 2011

898

64.4%

76.5%

6.2%

Business Administration

AS

Fall 2012

1059

65.0%

75.6%

7.7%

Business Administration

AS

Fall 2013

844

70.7%

78.8%

8.3%

Business Administration

AS

Spring 2011

782

69.9%

78.6%

8.4%

Business Administration

AS

Spring 2012

892

65.4%

77.8%

8.4%

Business Administration

AS

Spring 2013

751

59.5%

70.8

15.6%

Business Administration

AS

Spring 2014

737

68.2%

74.8

11.7%



Course Completion & Withdrawals (Program)

Program

Term

Students

ABCorP%

ABCDorP%

W%

Business Administration (AS)

Fall 2011

381

68.2%

81.6%

6.8%

Business Administration (AS)

Fall 2012

384

58.3%

79.2%

5.5%

Business Administration (AS)

Fall 2013

364

77.5%

87.1%

4.4%

Business Administration (AS)

Spring 2011

359

71.9%

79.1%

8.1%

Business Administration (AS)

Spring 2012

365

70.4%

82.5%

11.5%

Business Administration (AS)

Spring 2013

362

59.7%

72.4%

12.7%

Business Administration (AS)

Spring 2014

379

78.4%

82.8%

8.7%



Graduates

Major

Degree

AY2010/11

AY2011/12

AY2012/13

AY2013/14

Business Administration

AS

35

33

27

 



Graduate Rates

Major

Degree

Cohort

New Full Students

Graduation Rate 100%

Graduation Rate 150%

Graduation Rate 200%

Business Administration

AS

Fall 2008 FT

36

0.0%

25.0%

36.1%

Business Administration

AS

Fall 2009 FT

30

3.3%

26.7%

33.3%

Business Administration

AS

Fall 2010 FT

40

2.5%

10.0%

 

Business Administration

AS

<1 FT

40

 

 

 

  • "Program" information is based on Dickerson's concept of a "program" as expending resoruces and is linked to courses owned by a program from TracDat
  • Graduation rates are based on Fall new students(full time) cohorts that are tracked at 100%, 150%, and 200%
  • Retention rates are based on Fall new students (full time) cohorts who return the following fall semester
  • Persistence rates are based on Fall new students (full time) cohorts who return the following spring semester
 

Unit Assessment Report

Report Period: 2013-2014

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