A.S in Business Administration (AY 2011-2012)

Program Review

A.S Business Administration

October 2011

Prepared by Rafael A. Pulmano

Full-time Associate Professor, Business Division

 

 

  1. Program Goals

    Development of the private sector as key to promoting national economic self- sufficiency/self-reliance is one of the goals of the College of Micronesia-FSM. The A.S. in Business Administration Program addresses this goal by offering courses designed to:

    1. Equip those entering the business world with basic knowledge and entry- level skills appropriate for future employment or entrepreneurial pursuits.
    2. Upgrade skills for those already employed or engaged in business.
    3. Provide a firm foundation in terms of basic knowledge and skills as stepping stone for those wanting to pursue a higher degree in the field.
  2. Program Histrory

  3. The Associate of Science degree in Business Administration was added to COM-FSM’s offering in 1974 and the Associate of Science degree in Accounting in 1989. The programs were run side by side and were constantly updated to reflect changes in the job market and in academia. In 2002, upon recommendation by the Business Programs Advisory Council, accounting and business merged into one program – the Associate of Science in Business Administration. The program learning outcomes (above) were adopted in Spring 2004. As a result of a program evaluation made in February 2009, the program was modified, reducing the Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs) from nine to five, and increasing the graduation requirements from 68 to 70 credits. The changes were implemented in Fall 2010.

  4. Program Description

  5. Organization. The A.S. in Business Administration program, together with the A.S. in Computer Information Systems and the Third Year Certificate programs in Accounting and in General Business, operates under the Business Administration Division.

    Program Design. The program is designed to allow students who complete it, entry into the Third Year Certificate program in Accounting or in General Business, or transfer to a four-year college. Students may also choose to seek employment immediately upon graduation.

  6. Program Admission Requirements

  7. Applicants must meet the following admission requirements to be matriculated into this degree program:

    1. Have graduated or will graduate from high school at the end of the current school year, or have a GED certificate;
    2. Have a minimum high school grade point average of 2.0 as measured on a 4.0 scale, or a minimal score of 35 on each section and an average of 45 for all five sections of the GED test; and,
    3. Be accepted by the COM-FSM Admissions Board.
  8. Program Degree Requirements

  9. An Associate Degree in Business Administration is awarded upon satisfactory completion of the 29 credits of applicable General Education Core and 41 credits of the major courses, for a total of 70 credits. Before enrolling in any given course or advancing to the next-level course, students must first complete the corresponding prerequisite(s).

    The program's major courses, their brief descriptions and prerequisites are given below.

    COURSE

    COURSE  DESCRIPTION

    PREREQUISITE(S)

     

     

    AC 131 (4)
    Accounting I

     

    Establishes a foundation for the understanding of the accounting environment, basic accounting concepts, and the accounting model. Each step of the accounting cycle is covered in detail. Also covered are the sales, purchases, cash receipts and cash payments journals and their accompanying accounts receivable and accounts payable subsidiary ledgers; cash; and preparation of financial statements.

     

     

    ESL 089
    and MS 099

     

    AC 220 (4)
    Accounting II

     

    Builds on the understanding of accounting principles. This includes accounting for: payroll; accounts receivable and bad debts; notes and interest; inventory; depreciation, amortization, depletion and disposal of long-term assets; and partnerships and corporations.

     

     

    AC 131

     

    COURSE

    COURSE  DESCRIPTION

    PREREQUISITE(S)

     

    AC 250 (3)
    Managerial Accounting

     

    Develops concepts related to the information managers’ need in carrying out three essential functions within the business enterprise, such as how to plan operations, to control activities and to make decisions.

     

    AC 220

     

     

    BU 101 (3)
    Introduction to Business

     

    Establishes a foundation for the understanding of contemporary business and its environment. The course covers the various functional areas of business: management and organization, human resources, marketing, financing, accounting, and information systems. Business ethics and social responsibility, the global business environment and basic FSM business laws/regulations are also covered.

     

     

    ESL 089

     

    BU 250 (3)
    Principles of Finance

     

    Provides a general understanding of the financial aspects of business, such as financial statement analysis, risk and rate of return, time value of money, valuation of bonds and stocks, capital budgeting, and cost of capital.

     

    AC 220 and either MS 150 or BU/MS 110

     

     

    BU 260 (3)
    Fundamentals of Management

     

    Enables the students to develop an understanding of management and organization. The course focuses on important management functions such as planning, organizing, leading, and controlling for successful managerial activities. Students learn how successful managers use organizational resources through organizational functions in order to effectively and efficiently  achieve  organizational objectives.

     

     

    BU 101

     

    BU 270 (3)
    Principles
    of Marketing

     

    Introduces students to the basic concepts of marketing such as buyer behavior, market research and information systems, segmentation strategy, as well as the 4Ps. Students are also introduced to international marketing and to the broader marketing environment, including political/legal, economic, demographic, competitive and ethical issues.

     

     

    BU 101

     

    COURSE

    COURSE  DESCRIPTION

    PREREQUISITE(S)

     

    AC 250 (3)
    Managerial Accounting

     

    Develops concepts related to the information managers’ need in carrying out three essential functions within the business enterprise, such as how to plan operations, to control activities and to make decisions.

     

    AC 220

     

     

    BU 101 (3)
    Introduction to Business

     

    Establishes a foundation for the understanding of contemporary business and its environment. The course covers the various functional areas of business: management and organization, human resources, marketing, financing, accounting, and information systems. Business ethics and social responsibility, the global business environment and basic FSM business laws/regulations are also covered.

     

     

    ESL 089

     

    BU 250 (3)
    Principles of Finance

     

    Provides a general understanding of the financial aspects of business, such as financial statement analysis, risk and rate of return, time value of money, valuation of bonds and stocks, capital budgeting, and cost of capital.

     

    AC 220 and either MS 150 or BU/MS 110

     

     

    BU 260 (3)
    Fundamentals of Management

     

    Enables the students to develop an understanding of management and organization. The course focuses on important management functions such as planning, organizing, leading, and controlling for successful managerial activities. Students learn how successful managers use organizational resources through organizational functions in order to effectively and efficiently  achieve  organizational objectives.

     

     

    BU 101

     

    BU 270 (3)
    Principles
    of Marketing

     

    Introduces students to the basic concepts of marketing such as buyer behavior, market research and information systems, segmentation strategy, as well as the 4Ps. Students are also introduced to international marketing and to the broader marketing environment, including political/legal, economic, demographic, competitive and ethical issues.

     

     

    BU 101

     

    COURSE

    COURSE  DESCRIPTION

    PREREQUISITE(S)

     

    MS 150 (3)
    Introduction to Statistics

     

    Introduces the basic ideas of data presentation, descriptive statistics, basic probability, and inferential statistics. Incorporates the use of a computer spreadsheet package, MS Excel, for both data analysis and presentation. Studies basic concepts using applications from business, social science, health science, and the natural sciences.

     

     

    MS 100

    Source: COM-FSM General Catalog 2011-2013

     

     

     

     

     

  10. Program Courses and Enrollment

  11. A total of 475 students enrolled in the 13 major courses offered in Fall 2010. The number dropped to 451 in Spring 2011 although 14 major courses were offered. The percentage of sum of enrollment vis-a-vis the maximum sum of enrollment also showed a decrease of 84.1% for Spring 2011 from Fall 2010’s 91.0%. (See Tables 1 and 2.)

    Table 1
    PROGRAM COURSES AND ENROLLMENT
    2010.3 Fall Semester

     

    SUBJECT

     

    COURSE NO.

     

    COUNT OF SECTION

    SUM OF ENROLLMENT MAXIMUM

     

    SUM OF ENROLLMENT

     

    PERCENT

    AC

    131

    2

    51

    50

    98.0%

    AC

    220

    1

    25

    20

    80.0%

    AC

    250

    1

    27

    27

    100.0%

    BU

    101

    3

    79

    78

    98.7%

    BU

    250

    1

    25

    13

    52.0%

    BU

    260

    2

    50

    30

    60.0%

    BU

    270

    2

    26

    26

    100.0%

    BU

    271

    1

    25

    25

    100.0%

    BU/MS

    110

    1

    25

    25

    100.0%

    EC

    220

    1

    29

    29

    100.0%

    EC

    230

    1

    25

    19

    76.0%

    EN

    121

    2

    51

    50

    98.0%

    MS

    150

    3

    84

    83

    98.8%

    TOTALS

     

     

    522

    475

    91.0%

     

    Source: IRPO 2010_3 Fall data files CURRENT.XSLS

    Table 2
    PROGRAM COURSES AND ENROLLMENT
    2011.1 Spring Semester

     

    SUBJECT

     

    COURSE NO.

     

    COUNT OF SECTION

    SUM OF ENROLLMENT MAXIMUM

     

    SUM OF ENROLLMENT

     

    PERCENT

    AC

    131

    3

    70

    62

    88.6%

    AC

    220

    1

    25

    24

    96.0%

    AC

    250

    1

    25

    18

    72.0%

    BU

    101

    2

    55

    48

    87.3%

    BU

    250

    1

    25

    24

    96.0%

    BU

    260

    1

    25

    20

    80.0%

    BU

    270

    1

    25

    21

    84.0%

    BU

    271

    1

    26

    25

    96.2%

    BU

    310

    1

    25

    7

    28.0%

    BU/MS

    110

    2

    50

    30

    60.0%

    EC

    220

    1

    30

    30

    100.0%

    EC

    230

    1

    26

    25

    96.2%

    EN

    121

    2

    44

    42

    95.5%

    MS

    150

    3

    85

    75

    88.2%

    TOTALS

     

     

    536

    451

    84.1%

     

    Source: IRPO 2011_1 Spring data files CURRENT.XSLS

    Some of the courses cater to other programs as well, so the figures for them do not necessarily reflect enrollment performance for the A.S. Business Administration degree alone. A case in point is AC 131 which is taken by Business as well as CIS and HTM majors. MS 150 is also a required course for other programs.

    In Spring 2011 (see Table 2 above), one section of the AC 131 was offered at Pohnpei Campus, and one section of the BU/MS 110 at Chuuk Campus. As of this writing, it was not ascertained under which program(s) these courses were offered at said state campuses.

  12. Program Faculty

  13. Six (6) full-time instructors from the Business Division and two (2) part-time instructors from the National Campus and Pohnpei Campus teach the major program courses as of Spring 2011. The Business Division is chaired by Mr. Joseph Felix, Jr.

    Division Chair as of Spring 2011:

    jfelix

     

    Joseph Felix, Jr.
    Full-time Professor;

    B.A. (Park College, Missouri); M.S.
    (National University, San Diego).

    Email: felixjr@comfsm.fm

    Full-time Program Instructor as of Spring 2011:

    pulmano

    Rafael Pulmano, CPA
    Full-time Associate Professor; BachelorofScienceinCommerce, Major in Accounting (Saint Michael's College of Laguna, Philippines); Certified Public Accountant (Philippine Board of Accountancy, since 1982); Master in Business Administration (National College of Business and Arts, Philippines). Web site: http://comfsm.fm/~pulmano/ Email: pulmano@comfsm.fm

    marlene

    Marlene Manganon

    Full-time Assistant Professor; Bachelor of Science in Data Processing Management (Polytechnic University of the Philippines); Master in Business Administration (Virgen Milagrosa University, Philippines). Web site: http:// comfsm.fm/~mmmangonon/  Email: mmmangon@comfsm.fm

    marian

    Marian Medalla,CPA

    Full-time Assistant Professor; Bachelor of Science in Accountancy (Mindanao State University, Philippines); Certified Public Accountant (Philippine Board of Accountancy, since 2001); Master in Business Administration (Notre Dame of Dadiangas College, Philippines).  Email: marian_gratia@comfsm.fm

    ruci

    Ruci Yauvoli

    Full-time Instructor; Bachelor of Arts in Business (University of the South Pacific); Diploma in Credit Analysis (New York University); Master in Business Administration (University of the South Pacific).
    Email: ruciyauvoli@comfsm.fm

    dumo

    Aleili Dumo

    Full-time Instructor; Bachelor in Business Administration and Master in Business Administration (Philippine Christian University, Philippines)
    Email: adumo@comfsm.fm

    Part-time instructors as of Spring 2011:

    gmanganon

    George Mangonon
    Chair of Math and Science Division / Pohnpei Campus; Bachelor of Science in Mathematics (University of the Philippines); Master in Business Administration (Virgen Milagrosa University, Philippines).
    Web page: http://www.comfsm.fm/~gmangonon/
    Email: gmangonon@comfsm.fm

    daoas

     

    Doman Daoas

    Accountant - National Campus Business Office; B.A. and Master in Business Administration (Mountain Province State Polytechnic College, Philippines).

    Some program courses, such as Introduction to Statistics (MS 150) and Business Communications (EN/BU 121) are taught by faculty from other divisions.

  14. Program Outcome Analysis

  15. This section provides a concise analysis of the program health indicators data and assesses the extent to which established outcomes have been achieved. The following health indicators data were considered for evaluation:

    1. Program enrollment
    2. The Fall enrollment data from 2005 to 2010 showed an average increase of 24 students or 2.54% average growth rate over a five-year period. Fall 2007 showed substantial decrease in enrollment compared with the previous year, followed by further (but very minimal) decline in 2008. The next couple of years showed increasing trends, with 2009 showing the highest number of increase, 111, and 2010 registering the highest number of students enrolled, which was 1,051. (See Table 3 and Chart 1).

      Table 3
      COM-FSM PROGRAM ENROLLMENT
      Fall 2005 to 2010

      TERM

      Number

      Change

      % Change

      Fall 2005

      929

      -

      -

      Fall 2006

      974

      45

      4.84%

      Fall 2007

      903

      (71)

      (7.29%)

      Fall 2008

      895

      (8)

      (0.89%)

      Fall 2009

      1,006

      111

      12.40%

      Fall 2010

      1,051

      45

      4.47%

      Average

      960

      24

      2.54%

       

      Source: IRPO 2005-2010 Enrollment trend_data.xlsx

      Compared with other degree and certificate programs offered at the National Campus, A.S. Business Administration ranked second highest in enrollment during both Fall 2010 and Spring 2011, representing roughly 14% of the total enrollment.

      In Fall 2010, the program had 142 enrollees, which ranked next to Liberal Arts that had a total of 191. In Spring 2011, there were 140 students enrolled in the program, again ranking next to Liberal Arts which had 181 enrollees. (See Tables 4 and 5).

      These same set of data are graphically depicted in the charts that follow, showing Liberal Arts program as having 18% slice of the pie for both Fall 2010 and Spring 2011, thereby leading all programs in terms of enrollment, followed by A.S. in Business Administration garnering 14% (rounded) during the same period.
      Computer Information Systems, another program under the Business Division, also consistently placed third in the enrollment ranking, trailing Business Administration by only a few students.  (See Charts 2 and 3).

      Both tables and charts referred to clearly indicate that, on the basis of enrollment alone (not to mention its contribution to related revenues in the form of tuition), there is compelling reason for COM-FSM to continue to offer the program and make it part of the College’s priority in its allocation of resources during the budgeting process.

      Table 4 ENROLLMENT BY PROGRAM
      2010.3 Fall Semester

      Major Description

      Degree

      Number

      Percent

      Liberal Arts

      00

      121

      18.2%

      Business  Administration

      &'

      ()*

      13.5%

      Computer Information Systems

      03

      141

      13.4%

      Micronesian Studies

      00

      154

      11.8%

      Teacher Preparation

      00

      116

      10.9%

      Health Career Opportunities Program

      00

      77

      8.4%

      Teacher Preparation - Elementary

      89:

      ;<

      6.9%

      Marine Science

      03

      42

      4.7%

      Elementary Education

      (0

      <=

      3.4%

      Agriculture

      03

      17

      1.7%

      Trial Counselor

      :0

      1=

      1.5%

      Public Health

      89:

      15

      1.1%

      Public Health

      03

      1>

      1.0%

      Accounting

      89:

      1>

      1.0%

      Hospitality Management

      03

      2

      0.9%

      !"#"$%& ()*+#"**

      TYC

      7

      0.8%

      Early Childhood Education

      03

      0.3%

      Public Health

      :0

      5

      0.2%

      Liberal Arts / Media Studies

      00

      1

      0.1%

      Public Health

      00

      1

      0.1%

      ,#-&%**+."/

      UC

      5

      0.2%

      !"#$%

       

      (+,-(

      100.0%

       

      Table 5 ENROLLMENT BY PROGRAM
      2011.1 Spring Semester

      Major Description

      Degree

      Number

      Percent

      Liberal Arts

      00

      171

      18.4%

      Business  Administration

      &'

      (),

      14.2%

      Computer Information Systems

      03

      1<4

      13.6%

      Teacher Preparation

      00

      116

      11.7%

      Micronesian Studies

      00

      1>=

      10.8%

      Health Career Opportunities Program

      00

      ;6

      7.6%

      Teacher Preparation - Elementary

      89:

      62

      6.0%

      Marine Science

      03

      47

      4.9%

      Elementary Education

      (0

      <7

      3.9%

      Public Health

      89:

      1;

      1.7%

      Agriculture

      03

      1=

      1.6%

      Public Health

      03

      16

      1.5%

      Trial Counselor

      :0

      1<

      1.3%

      General Business

      89:

      7

      0.8%

      Hospitality Management

      03

      ;

      0.7%

      Accounting

      89:

      =

      0.6%

      Early Childhood Education

      03

      0.3%

      Public Health

      :0

      5

      0.2%

      Unclassified

      ,:

      1

      0.1%

      !"#$%

       

      ./)

      100%

       


    3. Graduation Rate
    4. The A.S. Business Administration program had 11 graduates in Fall 2010, representing 7.7% of all graduates for that period. It ranked third, with A.S. Teacher Education - Elementary leading the list with 23 graduates, followed by A.A. Liberal Arts. (See Table 6)

      In Spring 2011, A.A. Liberal Arts had 26 graduates, again ranking ahead of all other programs. A.S. Business Administration was second, with 16 graduates, equal to 14.8% of the total graduates for the term.  (See Table 6)

      The charts below show the same information from the tables mentioned in graphic fashion.  (See Charts 4 and 5).

      Table 6 GRADUATES BY PROGRAM
      2010.Fall Semester

      Major Description

      Degree

      Graduates

      Percent

      Teacher Education - Elementary

      AS

      23

      16.1%

      Liberal Arts

      AA

      22

      15.4%

      Business  Administration

      AS

      11

      7.7%

      Micronesian Studies

      AA

      11

      7.7%

      Computer Information Systems

      AS

      10

      7.0%

      Teacher Preparation

      AA

      8

      5.6%

      Agriculture and Food Technology

      CA

      7

      4.9%

      General Studies

      CA

      7

      4.9%

      Teacher Preparation - Elementary

      TYC

      7

      4.9%

      Trial Counselor

      CA

      7

      4.9%

      Marine Science

      AS

      6

      4.2%

      Building Technology

      AAS

      5

      3.5%

      Health Career Opportunities Program

      AA

      5

      3.5%

      Building Maintenance and Repair

      CA

      4

      2.8%

      General Business

      TYC

      4

      2.8%

      Accounting

      TYC

      2

      1.4%

      Agriculture

      AS

      2

      1.4%

      Electronics Technology

      AAS

      1

      0.7%

      Hospitality Management

      AS

      1

      0.7%

      Total

       

      143

      100.0%

       

      Table 7 GRADUATES BY PROGRAM
      2011.1 Spring Semester

      Major Description

      Degree

      Graduates

      Percent

      Liberal Arts

      AA

      26

      24.1%

      Business  Administration

      AS

      16

      14.8%

      Micronesian Studies

      AA

      16

      14.8%

      Health Career Opportunities Program

      AA

      11

      10.2%

      Teacher Preparation - Elementary

      TYC

      11

      10.2%

      Computer Information Systems

      AS

      8

      7.4%

      Teacher Preparation

      AA

      7

      6.5%

      Marine Science

      AS

      4

      3.7%

      Public Health

      TYC

      4

      3.7%

      Accounting

      TYC

      3

      2.8%

      Accounting

      AS

      1

      0.9%

      Trial Counselor

      CA

      1

      0.9%

      Total

       

      108

      100.0%

      Using the graduation rate data in Fall 2010 and Spring 2011 as criteria, the A.S. Business Administration was one of the top three performers among degree and certificate of achievement programs, and should therefore merit favorable consideration when the College decides which programs ought to be prioritized and which ones need to be cut.

    5. Average class size
    6. For the program courses, the average class size in both Fall 2010 and Spring 2011 was 22 students. There were 21 sections in Fall, and 20 in Spring. Classes in Microeconomics (EC 220) during both semesters showed the highest class size, i.e., 29 in Fall and 30 in Spring. (See Tables 8 and 9.)

      Table 8 AVERAGE CLASS SIZE
      2010.3 Fall Semester

       

      SUBJECT

       

      COURSE NO.

      SUM OF ENROLLMENT

      COUNT OF SECTION

      STUDENTS PER SECTION

      AC

      131

      50

      2

      25.0

      AC

      220

      20

      1

      20.0

      AC

      250

      27

      1

      27.0

      BU

      101

      78

      3

      26.0

      BU

      250

      13

      1

      13.0

      BU

      260

      30

      2

      15.0

      BU

      270

      26

      2

      13.0

       

      BU

      271

      25

      1

      25.0

      BU/MS

      110

      25

      1

      25.0

      EC

      220

      29

      1

      29.0

      EC

      230

      19

      1

      19.0

      EN

      121

      50

      2

      25.0

      MS

      150

      83

      3

      27.7

      TOTALS

       

      475

      21

      22.3

       

      Source: IRPO 2010_3 Fall data files CURRENT.XSLS

      Table 9 AVERAGE CLASS SIZE
      2011.1 Spring Semester

       

      SUBJECT

       

      COURSE NO.

       

      SUM OF ENROLLMENT

       

      COUNT OF SECTION

      STUDENTS PER SECTION

      AC

      131

      62

      3

      20.7

      AC

      220

      24

      1

      24.0

      AC

      250

      18

      1

      18.0

      BU

      101

      48

      2

      24.0

      BU

      250

      24

      1

      24.0

      BU

      260

      20

      1

      20.0

      BU

      270

      21

      1

      21.0

      BU

      271

      25

      1

      25.0

      BU/MS

      110

      30

      2

      15.0

      EC

      220

      30

      1

      30.0

      EC

      230

      25

      1

      25.0

      EN

      121

      42

      2

      21.0

      MS

      150

      75

      3

      25.0

      TOTALS

       

      444

      20

      22.2

       

      Source: IRPO 2011_1 Spring data files CURRENT.XSLS

       

    7. Student Seat Cost
    8. The average seat cost per student in FY 2011 is $154.08. The calculations to arrive at this figure were based on the total Business Division budget for the period, $238,312. This amount was then allocated among the four different programs offered by the division. The average number of program credits for one year was used as basis for prorating the amount. Finally, the ‘program budget’ was divided by the number of students enrolled in the program during the year, resulting in the average student seat cost. This allocation process and its results are shown in the following table. (See Table 10.)

      Table 10
      AVERAGE STUDENT SEAT COST
      2010.3 Fall Semester, 2011.1 Spring Semester, and 2011.2 Summer

       

      BUSINESS DIVISION PROGRAMS

      MAJOR CREDITS PER YEAR

       

      RATIO

      PROGRAM BUDGET FOR FY 2011

      NUMBER OF STUDENTS ENROLLED

      AVERAGE STUDENT SEAT COST

      TYC Accounting

      21

      25.3%

      $60,295.81

      19

      $3,173.46

      TYC General Business

      21

      25.3%

      $60,295.81

      21

      $2,871.23

      AS Business Administration

      20.5

      24.7%

      $58,860.19

      382

      $154.08

      AS Computer Information System

       

      20.5

       

      24.7%

       

      $58,860.19

       

      385

       

      $152.88

      Total

      83

      100.0%

      $238,312.00

      807

      $295.31

       

    9. Course Competion Rate for the program
    10. The Institutional Research and Planning Office (IRPO) website provides two completion rates, one for those passing a course with grades of ABC, and another passing with grades of ABCD. As expected, those passing with grades of ABCD showed higher completion percentage than those with ABC.

      For courses in the A.S. Business Administration program, the average completion rates in Fall 2010 were 74% for ABCP and 84% for ABCDP. These rates were higher than the completion rates at all levels in the College, which were 68% and 78% respectively. They were also higher by one percentage point compared with the College Level completion rates of 73% and 83%. (See Table 11.)

      In Spring 2011, the average completion rates for the program were 73% (ABCP) and 81% (ABCDP). These were generally higher when compared to rates in the state campuses, and even at the National Campus which had average completion rates of 69% and 79% respectively. (See Tables 11 and 12.).

      Table 11
      Course Completion Rates
      2010.3 Fall Semester

      Subject

      Course

      Total

      ABCP

      ABCDP

      %ABCP

      %ABCDP

      AC

      131

      56

      24

      36

      42.9%

      64.3%

      AC

      220

      21

      10

      17

      47.6%

      81.0%

      AC

      250

      27

      18

      23

      66.7%

      85.2%

      BU

      100

      7

      6

      6

      85.7%

      85.7%

      BU

      101

      128

      81

      91

      63.3%

      71.1%

      BU

      250

      13

      11

      12

      84.6%

      92.3%

      Table 11
      Course Completion Rates
      2010.3 Fall Semester

      Subject

      Course

      Total

      ABCP

      ABCDP

      %ABCP

      %ABCDP

      BU

      260

      30

      28

      28

      93.3%

      93.3%

      BU

      270

      26

      19

      19

      73.1%

      73.1%

      BU

      271

      25

      22

      22

      88.0%

      88.0%

      BU/MS

      110

      24

      23

      24

      95.8%

      100.0%

      EC

      220

      29

      16

      24

      55.2%

      82.8%

      EC

      230

      19

      16

      17

      84.2%

      89.5%

      EN

      121

      50

      42

      44

      84.0%

      88.0%

      MS

      150

      83

      61

      68

      73.5%

      81.9%

       

       

       

       

       

       

      Average

      38

      27

      31

      74.1%

      84.0%

       

       

       

       

       

       

      Levels

      Total

      ABCP

      ABCDP

      %ABCP

      %ABCDP

      All

      10,282

      6,983

      8,039

      67.90%

      78.20%

      College Level

      6,993

      5,117

      5,822

      73.20%

      83.30%

      Developmental

      3,289

      1,866

      2,217

      56.70%

      67.40%

      Table 12
      Course Completion Rates
      2011.1 Spring Semester

      Subject

      Course

      Total

      ABCP

      ABCDP

      %ABCP

      %ABCDP

      AC

      131

      50

      28

      33

      56.0%

      66.0%

      AC

      220

      25

      15

      24

      60.0%

      96.0%

      AC

      250

      19

      11

      13

      57.9%

      68.4%

      BU

      101

      54

      34

      37

      63.0%

      68.5%

      BU

      250

      25

      24

      24

      96.0%

      96.0%

      BU

      260

      25

      19

      20

      76.0%

      80.0%

      BU

      270

      25

      20

      20

      80.0%

      80.0%

      BU

      271

      26

      24

      25

      92.3%

      96.2%

      BU/MS

      110

      25

      20

      21

      80.0%

      84.0%

      EC

      220

      30

      22

      26

      73.3%

      86.7%

      EC

      230

      26

      20

      20

      76.9%

      76.9%

      EN

      121

      44

      28

      32

      63.6%

      72.7%

       

       

       

       

       

       

      Average

      31

      22

      25

      72.9%

      81.0%

       

       

       

       

       

       

      Campus

      Total

      ABCP

      ABCDP

      %ABCP

      %ABCDP

      Chuuk

      1,632

      1,070

      1,255

      65.60%

      76.90%

      Kosrae

      718

      471

      574

      65.60%

      79.90%

      National

      3873

      2654

      3051

      68.50%

      78.80%

      Pohnpei

      2147

      1486

      1641

      69.20%

      76.40%

      Yap

      718

      519

      562

      72.30%

      78.30%

      Total

      9088

      6200

      7083

      68.20%

      77.90%

       

       

    11. Students' Satisfaction rate
    12. No data is currently available from the IRPO web site regarding student satisfaction rate for this program.

    13. Employment Data
    14. No data is currently available from the IRPO web site regarding student satisfaction rate for this program.

    15. Transfer rate
    16. No data is currently available from the IRPO web site regarding student satisfaction rate for this program.

    17. Program's student learning outcomes
    18. By the time the student completes the A.S. degree program in Business Administration, he/she will be able to demonstrate basic knowledge and/or skills in:

      1. The different functional areas of business – accounting, management, marketing, economics, and finance – by emphasizing their importance in an organization and describing their interrelationship in the organization’s attempt to achieve its objectives.
      2. The use of cost and managerial accounting concepts and techniques as management tools for planning, controlling, evaluating performance and making decisions.
      3. Business mathematics and elementary statistics by accurately performing common business computations, statistical data presentation and analysis.
      4. Intercultural writing and speaking appropriate for business.
      5. The legal environment and ethical challenges confronting business in general and in the FSM, from both local and global perspectives.
    19. Students' learning outcomes for program courses

    A systematic way of measuring and monitoring how the program courses effectively meet the desired student learning outcomes is through the development and implementation of a well-designed assessment plan. Three worksheets have been developed and provided by the IRPO to assist in assessment design, delivery and reporting of results at the college.

    These worksheets are:

    1. Worksheet Academic #1 - Mission and Outcomes Development
    2. Worksheet Academic #2 - Assessment Plan
    3. Worksheet Academic #3 - Assessment Report
  16. Recommendations

  17. Finding No. 1 - Program Priority in FY2013 Budget

    A.S. Business Administration was among the top three programs that contribute revenues to the College in tuition and other fees through high enrollment. It also ranked high in terms of producing graduates for the institution. But in the FY 2011, Business Division (which offers four programs) ranked 4th among the instructional divisions at the national Campus, having a $238,312 budget, of which a mere $58,860 or about one-fourth being allocated to the A.S. Business Administration program. The division budget itself was only 43% of that of Math Science Division, 53% of Language and Literature Division, and 67% of Education Division.

    Recommendation:

    In its prioritization of the Academic Program in the budget development of 2013, the College should give due recognition to the program’s contribution as well as its role in the institution’s mission and commitment to assisting in the economic development of the Federated States of Micronesia by providing academic, career and technical educational opportunities for student learning. The College should allocate more resources to the Business Division to support its efforts of continuing to recruit more students and improve delivery of instruction and related services through investment in the latest technology and equipment, assigning more class rooms, and hiring of additional personnel.

    Finding No. 2 - Additional Rooms:

    In scheduling of classes to be offered every semester, it was noted that room availability always came up as a limiting factor.

    Recommendation::

    While shortage of rooms may also be a problem affecting other programs, the College should by this time have a clear priority and consider assigning more rooms to A.S. Business Administration.

    Finding No. 3 - Accounting Classroom:

    The program offers three courses in Accounting, namely AC 131, AC 220, and AC 250. While there is one room (B-103) which traditionally served as the Accounting Room, other Accounting classes are also held in different venues depending on room availability. In addition to the prescribed textbook, students have to carry an additional workbook for problem-solving activities. Not only are these two books heavy and bulky, some students sometimes forget to bring them; a few others forget or leave them in class, with some even losing them.

    Recommendation::

    There should be room(s) specifically devoted to Accounting courses, equipped with tables and chairs (not desks) to permit greater collaboration and mobility among students during class work and problem-solving activities. Tables should be able to accommodate 4-6 students, and designed to have open shelves or compartments underneath as receptacle for students’ bags and other things. Accounting rooms should be air-conditioned, with MagicBoard and speakers installed. Windows should have thick curtains or tinted glass jalousies for better viewing of instructional videos. There should be internet connection with sufficient bandwidth allocation within the room so that students could have ready access to online assignments and valuable learning resources. A locker should be provided so that students’ workbooks and other school-related items could be kept or left for safekeeping, for later retrieval and use every time the class meets.

    Finding No. 4 - Technology Integration:

    The trend nowadays is to download eBooks which is about 50% cheaper than printed books, with options to buy only selected chapters and therefore, lower cost for both students and instructors. Also, instructor resources are increasingly made available online making DVD resources obsolete. Courses can now be designed to include classes taking online quizzes and completing course assignments by logging in to the Publisher’s web site.

    Recommendation::

    Even with the ongoing initiative for the College to offer distance education, face- to-face instruction in a classroom environment remains a most effective and conducive strategy for student learning. For certain courses the latter is the better, if not the best, alternative. What the College needs to do is integrate technology, which is a main component of distance learning, to the traditional classroom setup by providing (or requiring) students with laptops and support facilities and services (printers, scanners, internet connection, credit card charging facility for ebook downloads and other online orders etc.). Likewise, program instructors must be provided with the latest technological tools and trainings to be in tune with current practices and advances in the academia worldwide. So in the FY 2013 budget allocation (or in the FY 2012 budget if it is to be revisited), it is recommended that program faculty be given additional funds for the acquisition of iPad tablets and accessories, plus online purchases of needed applications and eBooks for instructional use.

    Finding No. 5 - Program Coordinator:

    Other divisions have program coordinators. The Business Division, which offers four programs, needs the same for the division to more effectively monitor its program performance and turn out timely program-related reports, including program-level assessments and reviews. The coordinator can also assist in the program’s recruitment efforts and take active role in the advisory council.

    Recommendation::

    There should be a program coordinator for the A.S. Business Administration.

    Finding No. 6 - Tutorial Support Services:

    Students having difficulties with some of the program courses, especially Accounting, were requesting for tutoring services. This is particularly needed in Managerial Accounting (AC 250) which many students find most challenging. Accounting 1 (AC 131) students could also benefit from these services. In one instance, this instructor sent a really struggling freshman to the A+ Center to seek help (the SSSP was no longer in existence at the time). The student later reported that she found no one to talk to in the said office. The next time she went, only a work study was there. The third time, finally there was a staff, who told the student that she will be notified when a tutor is available. The poor student didn’t receive any notice nor tutorial service, and before the deadline for withdrawals the instructor advised to student to withdraw from the course. There simply was no way for the student to make it. Part of the problem was that she wasn’t ready for the college-level program. The other part, of course, was that she didn’t get the support she needed. While this writer would be quick to point out that this could be an isolated case, still it is clear that there is a need for provide tutoring that hadn’t been adequately addressed.

    Recommendation::

    The College should make sure qualified tutors are available to assist students of the program, particularly those taking up Accounting and Finance courses. One alternative is for the Business Division to have its own or in-house tutor. Also, the College should be more strict and discriminating in admitting students into the degree program.

    Finding No. 7 - The Summer Experience:

    This instructor tracked the daily and weekly performance of its Accounting 1 class during the Summer of 2011. Dramatic results were noted when compared with those in Fall 2010 and Spring 201, in terms of attendance and completion rates, among others. In Accounting courses, the degree of correlation between attendance and academic performance is quite high. Although no attempt had been made to establish the actual degree of correlation, it had been consistently observed in past semesters that those who frequently missed classes were usually those who also miserably lagged behind in home works, class works and exams. While the opposite may not always be true (perfect attendance = outstanding academic performance), the relationship is indeed significant and is being used here to illustrate the point. Completion. Tables 11 and 12 (shown earlier) indicated that completion rates for Fall 2010 were 42.9% for students with passing grades of ABC, and 64.3% for those with passing grades of ABCD. In Spring 2011 the rates were 56.0% and 66.0%. In Summer 2011, the completion rates were significantly higher at 75.0% and 93.8% respectively. (See chart below)

    comp rate pulmano

    Attendance.Shown below are three charts showing attendance in one section of Accounting class for three consecutive terms. It is quite evident from these charts that attendance during Summer of 2011 (colored pink) was consistently high as opposed to Fall and Spring whose trend lines looked like trips on a roller-coaster

    Fall 2010 Attendance (Partial Data)

    fall 2010

    Spring 2011 Attendance (Partial Data)

    spring 2011
    Summer 2011 Attendance (Weeks 1 to 6)

    summer 2011



    One plausible and compelling explanation was the scheduling of classes. During Summer the class met daily for three hours, while in Fall and Spring the class met every other day, specifically M-W-F, for two hours. It was apparent that classes held daily for three hours (for, in this case, a 4-credit course) benefitted tremendously from the uninterrupted flow of concepts and principles from one day to the next, and the flexibility allowed by longer hours for students to engage in class work activities (mostly problem solving), applying the concepts learned and getting immediate feedback on the same or the following day. The longer time periods also allowed for fast learners and slow ones to complete course work at their pace, with early finishers being given extra work for a chance to earn extra credits, while those who finish late had sufficient time to catch up. Also with daily meetings, the instructors felt that home assignments could be reduced and more activities could be accomplished in class with the instructor present to give direction and assistance. A final observation: Students focused their attention and efforts only on one or two classes during Summer, unlike during regular semesters when they had to worry about four or five different classes.

    As a final note, other instructors who taught during Summer 2011 shared with this instructor similar experiences and reported positive results.

     

    Recommendation::

    The College should consider scheduling certain classes (such as Accounting) daily similar to that of Summer for improved performance and higher completion rates. One way to implement this change is by shifting to the modular approach, where students can enroll in a number of subjects for a given semester, but will have to take and finish one course first, then move on to the next, and so forth, until all courses are completed within a semestral period. Since classes will be meeting daily, one goal is to complete each course within a few weeks, depending on how many hours the class meets daily.

    Finding No. 8 - Additional Pre-requisite for AC 220:

    In her Fall 2010 Course-Level Assessment Report, Prof. Marian Medalla recognized the need for students to have more skills in solving classic business math problems and a higher degree of analytical skills.

    Recommendation::

    Make BU/MS 110 (Business Math) a prerequisite of this course. More importantly, include basic logic and abstract reasoning as part of COMET so that only students with good analytical skills can be admitted in the AS Business Administration program.

    Finding No. 9 - Seat Cost Computation:

    The College has not adopted an official or uniform formula for computing average student seat cost. The formula used in this review was the same as that used in 2009, also prepared by this instructor for this program. A recent discussion with a colleague in the Business Division highlighted the flaw in the formula used. It was pointed out that in the allocation of the division budget among programs, the number of sections and not the number of credits should be used as basis. This argument has merit because programs offering more sections for a given course would naturally consume more budget resource. Unfortunately, current available data do not distinguish which sections (or students within that section) belong to a particular program. For example, Introduction to Business (BU 101) had three sections with 78 students enrolled in Fall 2010, and two sections with 48 students enrolled in Spring 2011. From the IRPO data, it wasn’t clear how many sections or how many students from a given section pertain to the A.S. Business Administration program. If this information is available, the division could come up with a more realistic program budget share and average seat cost figure.

    Recommendation::

    Enrollment Data should reflect not only enrollment by courses but by program as well. Also, see Finding No. 10 and related recommendation below.

    Finding No. 10 - College Data:

    The IRPO web site is a rich source of readily accessible data about the College. Unfortunately, some data needed for program assessment and review are still not available. And for this particular review, some inconsistencies in the presentation of data slowed down the work on this program review. On a positive note, the IRPO director was quick to respond to this writer’s request for additional information via email.

    Recommendation::

    All data needed for assessment and review should be posted in the IRPO web site in a timely manner. Data presentation should follow uniform and consistent formatting to avoid confusion and eliminate the need for extended analysis. Data relevant or targeted to specific user groups should be arranged in consecutive sheets for easy search and navigation.

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