Pre-Teacher Preparation

  • PSLO
  • Data Sheet
  • Program Review
  • Assessment Report

Program Student Learning Outcomes Assessment
(AY 2013-2014)

Program Student Learning Outcomes(PSLOs)

At the completion of Pre-Teacher Preparation Program the student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate basic knowledge of the foundations and concepts related to elementary education.
  2. Demonstrate familiarity with a variety of instruction strategies for elementary school students.
  3. Demonstrate basic knowledge in the following areas: art, communication, humanities, language, literature, science, and social sciences.

PSLO Assessment Report Summary

What we looked at:

The Education Division's assessment focused on all three PSLOs. Listed below are the assessment plans for each of the PSLOs.

  1. PSLO #1: Review composite exam on Education 200 level courses scores of the graduates of the Pre-Teacher Preparation program. (Target 60%)
  2. PSLO #2: Review teaching performance of students enrolled in ED 292 using a rubric. (Target 70%)
  3. PSLO #3: Review composite exam on content in the following areas: art, literature, science, philosophy and social studies scores of the graduates of the Pre-Teacher Preparation program. (Target 70%)

What we found:

  • For PSLO #1: Spring 2014- 5 of the 10 (50%) students who took the composite exam scored 60% or higher.
  • For PSLO #2: Spring 2014-16 of 24 (66%) students achieved 70% or higher on the scoring rubric.
  • No Results

What we are planning to work on:

  • Instructors who teach the 5 courses in AA Pre-Teacher Preparation program will meet to review the items missed by most students to ensure that the content is adequately taught in the courses.
  • Instructors will review composite exams for validity and reliability.
  • Meet and share teaching strategies to improve student learning.
  • Instructors will review and update course outlines.
  • Revise ED292 course outline to include more teaching practices.
  • Revise ED210 course outline to include classroom observations and a pre-requisite for ED292.
  • Meet with all education major students (Pre-Teacher Prep. & Teacher Prep.) at the beginning of the school year (semesters) to clarify requirements.

Recommendations for students:

  • Students should pass (letter grade of "C" or better) EN120b at the end of the first two semesters.
  • Students should attend and participate in class regularly.
  • Students should try to learn and retain information about student learning outcomes in the Pre-Teacher Prep. program in order to be successful on the composite exams.
  • Students should focus and pass courses with at least a “C” on the first try.
  • Students should take ED210 Intro. to Teaching before ED292 Practicum.

Program Data Sheet
Spring 2013

Download PDF Version of the Data Sheet

Enrollment by Major and Campus

Major:

Degree

Term

Chuuk

Kosrae

National

Pohnpei

Yap

Students

Teacher Preparation

AA

Fall 2011

234

37

131

40

33

475

Teacher Preparation

AA

Fall 2012

212

31

138

21

37

439

Teacher Preparation

AA

Fall 2013

163

37

118

9

30

357

Teacher Preparation

AA

Spring 2011

181

44

116

14

30

385

Teacher Preparation

AA

Spring 2012

227

36

129

26

33

451

Teacher Preparation

AA

Spring 2013

196

36

130

8

34

404

Teacher Preparation

AA

Spring 2014

141

29

110

6

29

315



Credits by Major and Campus

Major:

Degree

Term

Chuuk

Kosrae

National

Pohnpei

Yap

Credits

Teacher Preparation

AA

Fall 2011

3054

389

1621

490

450

6004

Teacher Preparation

AA

Fall 2012

2740

267

1650

248

363

5268

Teacher Preparation

AA

Fall 2013

2019

361

1456

106

357

4299

Teacher Preparation

AA

Spring 2011

2400

476

1406

161

357

4800

Teacher Preparation

AA

Spring 2012

2770

336

1566

309

398

5379

Teacher Preparation

AA

Spring 2013

2448

269

1555

78

397

4747

Teacher Preparation

AA

Spring 2014

1671

276

1296

65

325

3633



Credits by Program and Campus

Program

Term

Chuuk

Kosrae

National

Pohnpei

Yap

Credits

Teacher Preparation (AA)

Fall 2011

429

105

636

9

177

1356

Teacher Preparation (AA)

Fall 2012

492

78

762

27

66

1425

Teacher Preparation (AA)

Fall 2013

414

114

648

9

72

1257

Teacher Preparation (AA)

Spring 2011

423

126

495

 

123

1167

Teacher Preparation (AA)

Spring 2012

549

72

735

30

144

1530

Teacher Preparation(AA)

Spring 2013

534

93

783

42

189

1641

Teacher Preparation(AA)

Spring 2014

444

105

546

 

78

1173



Credits Enrolled, Attempted and Earned(averages)

Major

Degree

Term

CredEnrollAvg

CredAttAvg

CredEarnAvg

TermGPAAvg

Teacher Preparation

AA

Fall 2011

12.6

11.5

10.0

2.39

Teacher Preparation

AA

Fall 2012

12.0

10.8

9.2

2.25

Teacher Preparation

AA

Fall 2013

12.0

10.8

9.5

2.27

Teacher Preparation

AA

Spring 2011

12.5

11.1

9.3

2.38

Teacher Preparation

AA

Spring 2012

11.9

10.6

8.9

2.19

Teacher Preparation

AA

Spring 2013

11.8

10.1

8.4

2.14

Teacher Preparation

AA

Spring 2014

11.5

9.9

8.9

2.28



Program Sections, Enrollment Ratio and Average Class Size

Program

Term

Section

EnrollMax

Enrollment

EnrollRatio

AvgClassSize

Teacher Preparation (AA)

Fall 2011

27

579

425

73.4%

15.7

Teacher Preparation (AA)

Fall 2012

32

560

450

80.4%

14.1

Teacher Preparation (AA)

Fall 2013

26

547

401

73.3%

15.4

Teacher Preparation (AA)

Spring 2011

22

480

373

77.7%

17.0

Teacher Preparation (AA)

Spring 2012

27

615

471

76.6%

17.4

Teacher Preparation (AA)

Spring 2013

30

650

507

78.0%

16.9

Teacher Preparation (AA)

Spring 2014

26

590

391

66.3%

15.0



Persistence and Retention (new full time students)

Major Description

Degree

New Students FT 2011_3

Students 2012_1

Students 2012_3

Persistence Spring 2012

Retention Fall 2012

Teacher Preparation

AA

62

55

36

88.7%

58.1%


Major

Degree

New FT Fall 2012

Persisted Spring 2013

Retained Fall 2013

Persistence Spring 2013

Retention Fall 2013

Teacher Preparation

AA

62

49

39

79.0%

62.9%

Major

Degree

New FT Fall 2013

Persisted Spring 2014

Retained Fall 2014

Persistence Spring 2013

Retention Fall 2014

Teacher Preparation

AA

17

18

 

105.9%

0.0%



Course Completion & Withdrawals (Major)

Major

Degree

Term

Students

ABCorP%

ABCDorP%

W%

Teacher Preparation

AA

Fall 2011

1790

67.9%

78.4%

5.8%

Teacher Preparation

AA

Fall 2012

1990

70.90%

81.8%

5.4%

Teacher Preparation

AA

Fall 2013

1509

71.8%

79.8%

7.6%

Teacher Preparation

AA

Spring 2011

1602

69.0%

78.6%

7.6%

Teacher Preparation

AA

Spring 2012

1852

67.3%

78.1%

8.0%

Teacher Preparation

AA

Spring 2013

1663

65.5%

73.8%

11.6%

Teacher Preparation

AA

Spring 2014

1124

73.5%

80.4%

9.1%



Course Completion & Withdrawals (Program)

Program

Term

Students

ABCorP%

ABCDorP%

W%

Teacher Preparation (AA)

Fall 2011

449

76.6%

88.0%

5.3%

Teacher Preparation (AA)

Fall 2012

475

71.4%

80.8%

4.6%

Teacher Preparation (AA)

Fall 2013

419

71.6%

80.9%

4.1%

Teacher Preparation (AA)

Spring 2011

389

82.3%

90.0%

4.1%

Teacher Preparation (AA)

Spring 2012

510

74.7%

84.9%

7.5%

Teacher Preparation (AA)

Spring 2013

545

70.6%

78.7%

7.0%

Teacher Preparation (AA)

Spring 2014

391

80.8%

88.5%

5.4%



Graduates

Major

Degree

AY2010/11

AY2011/12

AY2012/13

AY2013/14

Teacher Preparation

AA

22

48

89

 



Graduate Rates

Major

Degree

Cohort

New Full Students

Graduation Rate 100%

Graduation Rate 150%

Graduation Rate 200%

Teacher Preparation

AA

Fall 2008 FT

14

0.0%

7.1%

35.7%

Teacher Preparation

AA

Fall 2009 FT

26

0.0%

46.2%

69.2%

Teacher Preparation

AA

Fall 2010 FT

84

0.0%

15.5%

 

Teacher Preparation

AA

Fall 2011 FT

 

 

 

 

  • "Program" information is based on Dickerson's concept of a "program" as expending resoruces and is linked to courses owned by a program from TracDat
  • Graduation rates are based on Fall new students(full time) cohorts that are tracked at 100%, 150%, and 200%
  • Retention rates are based on Fall new students (full time) cohorts who return the following fall semester
  • Persistence rates are based on Fall new students (full time) cohorts who return the following spring semester

Program Review(National Campus)

AP Full Official:

Campus: National Campus/System-Wide

Completed by: Magdallena Hallers

AP Review Submission Date:

AR Review Cycle: Fall 2012-Spring 2014

  1. Program Goals

    1. Demonstrate basic knowledge of the foundations and concepts related to elementary education.
    2. Demonstrate familiarity with a variety of instruction strategies for elementary school students.
    3. Demonstrate basic knowledge in the following areas: art, communication, humanities, language, literature, science, and social sciences.
  2. Program History

    In 1963 The Trust Territory of he Pacific Islands and the University of Hawaii created the Micronesian Teacher Education Center (MTEC) to provide in-service teacher training. MTEC began offering a pre-service associate of science degree program in teacher education in 1969. In 1970 MTEC became Community College of Micronesia (CCM). CCM added an in-service teacher education degree through the merging of the College’s extension program and the district teacher education centers in 1974. CCM was first accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges in 1978. In 1982 the Third-year Certificate of Achievement programs in Elementary and Special Education were added. In 1992 the FSM established COM-FSM as a public corporation, and in 1993 CCM became COM-FSM. Also in 1993, the Certificate of Achievement in Preschool Teacher Education was added. In 1994 the Third-year Certificate of Achievement in Related Services Assistant was added, followed by the Third-year Certificate of Achievement program in Educational Leadership Academy in 1995. In 1996 the Associate of Science Degree program in Early Childhood Education was approved. In 1998 an agreement was signed with the University of Guam (UOG) to establish a branch UOG campus at the National Campus to offer fourth-year courses in elementary education to enable students to earn their bachelor’s degree from UOG. This agreement was followed by a collaborative arrangement between COM-FSM and UOG to offer the fourth-year elementary education program. This arrangement is now known as the COM-FSM/UOG Partnership BA Program. In 2002 a Bachelor of Arts Degree program in Elementary Education was approved by the Board of Regents but the substantive change proposal for this degree program was not approved by WASC. In 2009 the Associate of Science Degree program in Teacher Education- Elementary was phased out and replaced by the Associate of Arts Degree program in Teacher Preparation. In 2011 this program was renamed the Associate of Arts in Pre-teacher Preparation- Elementary. During 2009-2011 the Associate Degree programs in Early Childhood and Special Education were "shelved" due to low enrollment.

  3. Program Descriptions

    Originating as a teacher training institution, COM-FSM through its education division continues the task of bettering education in Micronesia. Programs are carefully designed to equip students with the necessary knowledge and skills to meet the challenges of teaching effectively in a culturally relevant manner. At present the college offers an Associate of Arts in Pre-Teacher Preparation- Elementary. These programs provide students with courses rich in content, theoretical foundations and practical experiences (methodology), which are designed to address the needs of pre-service and in-service teachers who may want to, pursue the baccalaureate degree at UOG.

    Through a collaborative effort, UOG offers the Partnership BA in Elementary Education at the national campus making it possible for students to earn a bachelor’s degree from UOG without leaving the FSM. Students who are interested in this program should be aware that the associate degree and the third-year in teacher preparation-elementary have been articulated to meet the requirements of the bachelor’s degree.

  4. Program Admission Requirements

    Admission to the AA degree in Pre-Teacher Preparation is per the COM-FSM admissions policy as stated in the catalog.

  5. Program Certificate/Degree Requirements

    General Education Core Requirements ..................29credits

    English (9 credits):
    EN 110 Advanced Reading (3), EN 120a Expository Writing (3), EN 120b Expository Writing II (3)

    Mathematics (3 credits): Any 100 level or above mathematics course (recommended: MS 100 College Algebra or MS 101 Algebra & Trigonometry or MS 150 Statistics)

    Natural Sciences (7 credits)
    A science course w/laboratory (4 credits);
    Science without lab((recommended: SC101 Health Science or SC112 Nutrition or ESS/SC 200 Fundamentals of Wellness and Physical Fitness) (3)

    Social Science (3 credits)
    SS 150 History of Micronesia (3)

    Computer Applications (3 credits):
    CA 100 Computer Literacy (3)

    Physical Education (1credits):
    Any Choice of any ESS offering(1)

    Humanities (3 credits):
    Any course in music, history, literature, philosophy, or language (recommended: MU 101) (3)


    Major Requirements................................................40credits
    • AR 101 Intro to Art (3)
    • ED 210 Intro to Professional Teaching (3)
    • ED 215 Intro to exceptional Children (3)
    • ED/PY 201 Human Growth and Development (3)
    • EN 200 series (EN 201 Introduction to Literature (3); and EN 205 Literature of the Sea (3)
    • EN 208 Introduction to Philosophy (3)
    • EN/CO 205 Speech Communication (3)
    • ED 292 Practicum Observation and Participation (3)
    • MS/ ED 210 Math for Teachers (3)
    • Science with lab (4)
    • SS 120 Introduction to Geography (3)
    • SS 126 Pacific Geography or SS 170 World History or SS 171 World History II (3)
    • SS/PY 101 General Psychology (3)

    Graduation Requirement..............................................70 Credits

    Pre-Teacher Preparation Suggested Schedule

    First Semester
    EN 110 Advanced Reading........3
    EN 120a Expository Writing I........3
    SS 150 Micronesian History........3
    CA 100 Computer Literacy........3
    ESS course........................1
    MS 100 or MS 101 or MS 150........3
    Total Credits........16



    Second Semester
    EN 120b Expository Writing II........3
    SS120 Introduction to Geography........3
    Science with Lab........4
    EN/CO 205 Speech Communication........3
    SS/PY 101 General Psychology........3
    Total Credits........16



    Summer Session
    ED/PY 201 Human Growth and Development......3
    AR 101 Introduction to Art...................3

    Third Semester
    MS/ED 210a Math for Teachers........3
    EN 208 Introduction to Philosophy........3
    Humanities elective*........3
    ED 210a Intro to Professional Teaching...3
    Science without Lab........3
    Total Credits........15



    Fourth Semester
    Science with Lab........4
    EN 200 Elective........3
    ED 215 Intro. to Exceptional Children........3
    SS 125 or SS 170 or SS 171........3
    ED 292 Practicum........3
    Total Credits........16



    Program Course Matrix
    ED 292(SLOs) PLO 1 PLO 2 PLO 3
    1. The student will demonstrate of how curriculum standards and benchmarks are used at an elementary school using student learning outcomes I ID ID
    2. The student will prepare appropriate lesson plans based on FSM or State-approved minimum curriculum standards and deliver at least one lesson before a group. I ID I
    3. The student will understand how to use assessment instruments to detect student-learning (strengths and weaknesses) I ID I
    4. The student will conduct school site vitiations. I ID ID
     
    MS/ED 210a(SLOs) PLO 1 PLO 2 PLO 3
    1. Identify different strategies to solve problems, reflect and clarify his/her own thinking about mathematical ideas and situations. I   D
    2. Demonstrate familiarity with a variety of instruction strategies for elementary school students. I   D
    3. Demonstrate competence in understanding numerous ways of representing numbers, relationships among numbers, and the numeration system and its operations. I   D
    4. Demonstrate competence in understanding the systems of measurement; the US custom and the metric system. I   D
    5. Develop understanding of the study of shapes in space, and geometry. I   D
     
    ED 210(SLOs) PLO 1 PLO 2 PLO 3
    1. Explain the four foundations or roots of traditional (pre-colonial) education, and the purposes of education in Spanish, German, Japanese and Trust Territory governments. I    
    2. Explain curriculum in terms of formal and informal curriculum; content standards, benchmarks, and standards; as well as curriculum scope and sequence I   !
    3. Explain and give examples of “barriers to learning” and explain and give examples of various methods and strategies teachers use in overcoming student learning barriers. I I  
    4. Explain various ways in which evidence of learning is designed and gathered, to include the relationship between Student Learning Outcomes and Bloom’s Taxonomy. I I  
    5. Explain and gives examples of creating a positive physical and psychological environment for learning in the classroom. I   I
    6. Explain Programs Learning Outcomes and INTASC Standards and note the background knowledge necessary for professional teachers I   I
    7. List and explain the elements of professionalism and certification in general and specifically what must be done to achieve and maintain FSM teacher certification. I    
    8. Explain school administration in terms of responsibility and authority; the teachers’ role in the educational organization; the importance of community relations; as well as the role of the various professional educators in community relations. I    
     
    ED/PY 201(SLOs) PLO 1 PLO 2 PLO 3
    1. Become knowledgeable of the developmental theories and their application in a Micronesian context; D   D
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the biology of human development;     I
    3. Develop an understanding of the major cognitive and emotional/social developmental stages of individuals from birth to young adulthood; D   I
    4. Become knowledgeable of the various aspects and issues of middle childhood years; and D   D
    5. Demonstrate knowledge of the various aspects and issues of adolescent development.     D
     
    ED 215(SLOs) PLO 1 PLO 2 PLO 3
    1. Demonstrate a basic understanding of the history of special education and underlying issues affecting public policy, community values, and trends in providing special education programs. I I I
    2. Demonstrate a basic understanding of laws and regulations effecting special education and children with disabilities. I    
    3. Become knowledgeable of common key terms and concepts that are used in special education. I    
    4. Demonstrate knowledge of the disability categories and a basic understanding of the educational implications/approaches for each category. I ID iD
    5. Become knowledgeable of the special education process and services. I I  
  6. Program Courses and Enrollment

      National Chuuk Yap Kosrae
    Course F12 Sp13 F13 SP14 F12 Sp13 F13 SP14 F12 Sp13 F13 SP14 F12 Sp13 F13
    ED 210a 48 26 40 15 28 26 18 24 0 11 0 11 9 16 8
    ED 215 28 24 23 22 22 31 23 13 0 0 0 11 0 0 0
    MS/ED 210 29 27 25 21 25 30 24 29 0 13 12 0 14 0 0
    ED/PY 201 52 48 51 55 31 21 14 9 12 0 7 0 0 0 12
    ED 292 49 32 15 24 18 25 20 20 10 8 4 4 3 3 2 0
    Total 204 157 154 137 124 133 99 95 22 32 23 26 26 19 22 26
  7. Program Faculty

    Magdalena Hallers
    Chairperson/ Professor
    B.A., University of Guam
    M.Ed., University of Guam
    mhallers@comfsm.fm

    Paul Gallen
    Professor of Education
    B.A., University of Guam
    M.Ed., University of Hawaii
    paulg@comfsm.fm

    Robert Andreas
    Associate Professor
    B.A., University of Guam
    M.A., University of Hawaii, Manoa
    andreas@comfsm.fm

    Sylvia Henry
    Partnership BA Coordinator
    A.A., College of Micronesia-FSM
    B.A.E., University of Guam
    shenry@comfsm.fm

    Dr. Richard Womack
    Professor of Education/Business
    B.A., University of California at Berkeley
    M.Ed./Ed.D., University of Nevada, Reno
    rwomack@comfsm.fm

    Susan Moses
    Professor
    B.S., University of Illinois
    M.Ed., University of Oregon
    smoses@comfsm.fm

    Dr. Sven Mueller
    Instructor
    M.A., Free University of Berlin, Germany
    Ed. D., Indiana University
    drsven@comfsm.fm

    Josephine Kostka
    Administrative Assistant
    A.A. Community College of Micronesia
    josephine@comfsm.fm

    Robert Asher Hallens
    Computer Lab Monitor
    A.A.S., College of Micronesia-FSM
    ashehall@comfsm.fm

  8. Program Indicators

    1)Assessment of Course Learning Outcomes (National Campus)

    Courses and SLOs Fall 2012 Spring 2013 Fall 2013
    ED 210 Intro. to Teaching Not Available N=26 N=40
    CLO 1 Not Available 20 (76%) 17 (42%)
    CLO 2 Not Available 22 (84%) 20 (50%)
    CLO 3 Not Available 20 (76%) 23 (57%)
    CLO 4 Not Available 22 (84%) 20 (50%)
    CLO 5 Not Available 23 (88%) 19 (47%)
    CLO 6 Not Available 20 (76%) 20 (50%)
    CLO 7 Not Available 19 (73%) 17 (42%)
    CLO 8 Not Available 20 (76%) Not Available
    ED 215 Intro. to Except. Children N=22 N=24 N=23
    CLO 1      
    SSLO1.1 18 (81%) 23 (95%) 22 (95%)
    CLO 2      
    SSLO2.1 20 (90%) 24 (100%) 22 (95%)
    SSLO2.2 16 (72%) 20 (83%) 20 (86%)
    CLO 3      
    SSLO3.1 16 (72%) 18 (75%) 15 (65%)
    SSLO3.2 18 (81%) 19 (79%) 21 (91%)
    CLO 4      
    SSLO4.1 16 (72%) 20 (83%) 16 (69%)
    SSLO4.2 19 (86%) 19 (79%) 15 (65%)
    CLO 5      
    SSLO5.1 13 (59%) 24 (100%) 17 (73%)
    SSLO5.2 17 (77%) 21 (87%) 17 (73%)
    SSLO5.3 17 (77%) 22 (91%) 17 (73%)
    SSLO5.4 18 (81%) 22 (91%) 23 (100%)
    ED/PY 201 Human Growth & Dev.   N=48 N=51
    CLO 1 Not Available 26 (54%) 14 (27%)
    SSLO1.1  )    
    CLO 2 Not Available 27 (56%) 25 (49%)
    SSLO2.1 Not Available Not Available Not Available
    SSLO2.2 Not Available Not Available Not Available
    SSLO2.3 Not Available Not Available Not Available
    SSLO2.4 Not Available Not Available Not Available
    CLO 3 Not Available Not Available Not Available
    SSLO3.1 Not Available 36 (75%) 25 (49%)
    SSLO3.2 Not Available 38 (79%) Not Available
    SSLO3.3 Not Available 32 (66%) 24 (47%)
    SSLO3.4 Not Available 40 (83%) 25 (49%)
    MS/ED 210 Math for Tchrs.   N=27 N=25
    CLO 1 Not Available 27 (100%) 22 (88%)
    CLO 2 Not Available 27 (100%) 23 (92%)
    CLO 3 Not Available 20 23 (92%)
    CLO 4 Not Available 27 (100%) 23 (92%)
    CLO 5 Not Available 27 (100%) 23 (92%)
    CLO 6 Not Available 27 (100%) 23 (92%)
    ED 292 Practicum   N=32 N=15
    CLO 1 Not Available 26 (81%) 12(80%)
    SSLO1.1      
    CLO 2 Not Available 32 (100%) 15(100%)
    SSLO2.1      
    CLO 3 Not Available 30 (93%) 15(100%)
    SSLO3.1      
    CLO 4 Not Available 30 (93%) 15(100%)
    SSLO4.1      

    2) Assessment of Program Student Learning Outcome: Division assessed all program learning outcomes. The results are shown below.

    Program Outcome Assessment Target Spring 2013 Results Fall 2013 Results
    Demonstrate basic knowledge of the foundations and concepts related to elementary education. All exiting AA graduates will take a composite exam on Education 200 level courses 60% 7 of the 15 students achieved 60% or higher on the composite exam. Not available
    Demonstrate familiarity with a variety of instructional strategies for elementary school students. Juried review of video tapes of teaching performance using a rubric 70% 28 of the 32 students achieved 70% or higher on the rubric. All (15) students achieved 70% or higher on the rubric.
    Demonstrate basic knowledge in the following areas: art, language, literature, science, math and social studies. All exiting AA graduates will take a composite exam on content in the following areas: art, literature, science, philosophy, and social studies.
    ll exiting AA graduates will take NSTT Math section, Gates McGinittie, and writing sample
    70% 2 of the 27 students achieved 70% or higher on the exam. Not available

    3) Program Enrollment

    Term.   National Pohnpei Chuuk Kosrae Yap Total
    Spring 2011 AA 116 14 181 44 30 385
     
    Fall 2011 AA 131 40 234 37 33 475
     
    Spring 2012 AA 129 26 227 36 33 451
     
    Fall 2012 AA 138 21 212 31 37 439
     
    Spring 2013 AA 130 8 196 36 34 404
     
    Fall 2013 AA 118 9 163 37 30 357
     
    Spring 2014 AA            

    Enrollment since spring 2011 fluctuates, with the lowest in fall 2013 semester.

    4) Average Class Size by Term

    Term. Sections Max Enrollment Enrollment Enrollment Ratio Average Class Size
    Fall 2011 27 579 425 73.4% 15.7
    Fall 2012 32 560 450 80.4% 14.1
    Fall 2013 26 547 401 73.3% 15.4
    Spring 2011 22 480 373 77.7% 17.0
    Spring 2012 27 615 471 76.6% 17.4
    Spring 2013 30 650 507 78.0% 16.9

    5) Course Completion Rate by Term


    Fall 2012
    Campus Course Enrolled ABC or P ABCD or P %ABC or P %ABCD or P
    Chuuk ED 210 28 25 27 89.3% 96.4%
    Kosrae   9 8 9 88.9% 100.0%
    National   48 25 34 51.2% 70.8%
    Pohnpei   0 0 0 0% 0%
    Yap   0 0 0 0% 0%
    Chuuk ED 215 25 19 22 86.4% 100.0%
    Kosrae   0 0 0 0% 0%
    National   26 12 15 46.2% 57.7%
    Pohnpei   0 0 0 0% 0%
    Yap   0 0 0 0% 0%
    Chuuk ED 292 18 15 15 83.3% 83.3%
    Kosrae   3 3 3 100% 100%
    National   49 37 41 75.5% 83.7%
    Pohnpei   0 0 0 0% 0%
    Yap   10 10 10 100% 100%
    Chuuk MS/ED 210 25 19 20 76.0% 80.0%
    Kosrae   14 14 14 100% 100%
    National   29 24 26 82.8% 89.7%
    Pohnpei   0 0 0 0% 0%
    Yap   0 0 0 0% 0%
    Chuuk ED/PY 201 31 26 27 83.9% 87.1%
    Kosrae   0 0 0 0% 0%
    National   52 20 31 38.5% 59.6%
    Pohnpei   0 0 0 0% 0%
    Yap   12 11 12 91.7% 100%
    Spring 2013
    Campus Course Enrolled ABC or P ABCD or P %ABC or P %ABCD or P
    Chuuk ED 210 26 22 25 84.6% 96.2%
    Kosrae   16 11 15 68.8% 93.8%
    National   29 13 18 44.8% 62.1%
    Pohnpei   0 0 0 0% 0%
    Yap   11 8 10 72.7% 90.9%
    Chuuk ED 215 31 26 27 83.9% 87.1%
    Kosrae   0 0 0 0% 0%
    National   29 13 18 44.8% 62.1%
    Pohnpei   1 1 1 100% 100%
    Yap   0 0 0 0% 0%
    Chuuk ED 292 25 20 23 80.0% 92.0%
    Kosrae   3 3 3 100% 100%
    National   31 28 29 90.35% 93.5%
    Pohnpei   2 2 2 100% 100%
    Yap   8 8 8 100% 100%
    Chuuk MS/ED 210 30 25/td> 25 83.3% 83.3%
    Kosrae            
    National   27 26 26 96.3% 96.3%
    Pohnpei   1 1 1 100% 100%
    Yap   13 13 13 100% 100%
    Chuuk ED/PY 201 21 15 16 71.4% 76.2%
    Kosrae   0 0 0 0% 0%
    National   51 20 29 39.2% 56.9%
    Pohnpei   0 0 0 0% 0%
    Yap            

    Fall2013

    -Data not available

    Course Completion and Withdrawal

    Term

    Students

    ABC or P%

    ABCD or P%

    W&

    Spring 2011

    389

    82.3%

    90.0%

    4.1%

    Fall 2011

    449

    76.6%

    88.0%

    5.3%

    Spring 2012

    510

    74.7%

    84.9%

    7.5%

    Fall 2012

    475

    71.4%

    80.8%

    4.6%

    Spring 2013

    545

    70.6%

    78.7%

    7.0%

    Fall 2013

    419

    71.6%

    80.9%

    4.1%

    6) Persistence and Retention (new full time students)

    Major

    Degree

    New Students FT 2011_3

    Students 2012_1

    Students 2012_3

    Persistence Spring 2012

    Retention Fall 2012

    Teacher Preparation

    AA

    62

    55

    36

    88.7%

    58.1%

    Major

    Degree

    New FT Fall 2012

    Persisted Spring 2013

    Retained Fall 2013

    Persistence Spring 2013

    Retention Fall 2013

    Teacher Preparation

    AA

    62

    49

    39

    79.0%

    62.9%

    7)Graduation Rate

    Cohort

    New Full Students

    Graduation Rate 100%

    Graduation Rate 150%

    Graduation Rate 200%

    Fall 2008FT

    14

    0.0%

    7.1%

    35.7%

    Fall 2009FT

    26

    0.0%

    46.2%

    69.2%

    Fall 2010FT

    84

    0.0%

    15.5%

     %

    Graduates

    Major

    Degree

    AY2010/11

    AY2011/12

    AY2012/13

    Teacher Preparation

    AA

    22

    48

    89

    Major

    Degree

    AY2010/11

    AY2011/12

    AY2012/13

    Teacher Ed. Preparation

    AS

    67

    34

    8

    Graduation rate from AY2011 to AY2012/13 has increased from 22 to 89.

    8) Student Seat Cost

    9) Cost of Duplicate or Redundant Courses/Programs/Services

    10) Revenue Generated by Program-Tuition (program allocated; grant income)

    Term

    Chuuk

    Kosrae

    National

    Pohnpei

    Yap

    Credits

    Tuition Generated

    Fall 2011

    3054

    389

    1621

    490

    450

    6004

    $690,460

    Fall 2012

    2740

    267

    1650

    248

    363

    5268

    $605,820

    Fall 2013

    2019

    361

    1456

    106

    357

    4299

    $494,385

    Spring 2011

    2400

    476

    1406

    161

    357

    4800

    $552,000

    Spring 2012

    2770

    336

    1566

    309

    398

    5379

    $618,585

    Spring 2013

    2448

    269

    1555

    78

    397

    4747

    $545,905

    11) Students Satisfaction Rate

    12) Alumni data

    None

    13) Employment data and employer feedback (employer surver)

    14) Program added or cancelled at nearby regional institutions (PCC, GCC, Hawaii schools, UOG, CMI, NMC)

    15) Transfer rate/Follow Up

    Semester Graduated

    3rd Year Teacher Prep.Program Enrollment

    Fall 2012

    4

    Spring 2013

    16

    Fall 2013

    22

  9. Analysis

    Findings:

    1. Assessment of Course Learning Outcomes. Course level assessment formats vary in that some are assessed at the specific level and some at the general level. Course level assessments for fall 2012 are not available. The expectations for the course level assessments must be clearly articulated and shared with the faculty for a consistent format.

      Below are summaries developed by the instructors who taught and developed the course level assessments.

      ED 210 Introduction to Teaching. Students performed remarkably well in the course except three students who failed due to chronic absenteeism.

      ED 215 Introduction to Except. Children. There is a decline in students' performance in most of the student learning outcomes in fall 2013. The decline in students' performance is the result of lack of preparation and missed course work as a result of absenteeism.

      ED/PY 201 Human Growth and Development. (Not available) Most student learning outcomes are not covered in both semesters. Data shows that with the decline in students' performance, about half of the class population did not meet expectations of each student learning outcome.

      MS/ED 201 Math for Teachers. All students passed the course with a grade of "C" or better except two who failed to due to chronic absenteeism.

      ED 292 Practicum. All students performed very well and passed the course in fall 2013 compared to students’ performance in spring 2013.

    2. Assessment of Program Student Learning. The assessment results are not available for fall 2013 except for PSLO #2.
    3. Program Enrollment. Program enrollment system wide dropped, hence effecting student enrollment in the pre-teacher preparation program.
    4. Average Class Size. Average class varies ranging from 14.1 to 17.4 percent. The average class size for spring 2013 is 16.9. for 30 program sections. Class size is also affected by the maximum enrollment for ED 292, which is 15 students.
    5. Course Completion Rate. Course completion rate system wide is 70.6% or higher for A B C or P and 78.7% or higher for A B C D or P. Course completion rate is above the average which is 68%.
    6. Persistence and Retention Rate. Student persistent rate for spring 2011 to fall 2012 is 88.7%. For fall 2012 to spring 2013, student persistent rate is 79%. There is 9.7% decrease in student persistence from spring 2011 to spring 2013. The retention rate increased by 4.8% in fall 2013, from 58.1% in all 2012 to 62.9% in fall 2013.
    7. Graduation Rate by Academic Year. There is an increase in the graduation rate (150% and 200%) for fall 2008 and 2009, and a decrease in graduation rate (150%) for fall 2010.
    8. Student Seat Cost. No student seat cost available.
    9. Cost of Duplicate or Redundant Courses/Programs/Services.
    10. Revenue Generated by Program-Tuition (program allocated; grant income)
    11. Student Satisfaction Rate
    12. Alumni Data
    13. Employment Data and Employer Feedback
    14. Program Added or Cancelled at Nearby Institutions (PCC,GCC, Hawaii Schools, UOG, CMI, NMC). None
    15. Transfer Rate/Follow Up. The information available for the office is for students who enroll into the Teacher Preparation program. Information for students transferring to other institutions is not available.

    Recommendations:

    1. Assessment of Course Learning Outcomes. Expectations and training for inputting data on TracDat should be clearly articulated to faculty. Faculty should complete and submit course level assessments every semester on a timely manner.
    2. Course outlines need to be reviewed and updated. Course level assessment results and recommendations need to be taken into account when updating course outlines.
    3. Assessment of Program Student Learning.
      1. There is a need to review the composite exam used for PSLO #1 for validity and reliability.
      2. The division needs to determine on how to assess PSLO # 3.
    4. Program Enrollment. There is a need do an extensive recruitment at the high schools and participate in recruitment visits.
    5. Average Class Size. There is a need to plan and schedule courses accordingly, for some of the courses have low enrollment.
    6. Course Completion Rate. Though the course completion rate is above average, there is a need for proper student advising and counseling to encourage and motivate students. Instructional strategies need to be taken into account to meet the different learning styles of students.
    7. Persistence and Retention Rate. There is a need to develop mechanisms to help students focus and prepare on their studies. There is also a need to integrate different teaching strategies to help motivate students and improve class attendance and fulfillment of course requirements.
    8. Graduation Rate by Academic Year. There is a need to advise students properly so they can graduate and transition into the Teacher Prep. Program. Students need to be aware of the requirements of the TYC and the Partnership programs.
    9. Student Satisfaction Rate. Awaits results from IRPO.
    10. There is a need to develop a mechanism to help with alumni data, employment data, employer feedback, and transfer rate/follow up.

Unit Assessment Report

Report Period: 2013-2014

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