Carpentry Program

  • PSLO
  • Data Sheet
  • Program Review
  • Assessment Report

Program Student Learning Outcomes Assessment
(AY 2019-2020)

Program Student Learning Outcomes(PSLOS)

At the completion of Carpentry Program the student will be able to:

  1. Identify safety and occupational health requirements in the carpentry trade.
  2. Use competently specified hand and power tools.
  3. Perform basic hand skills in constructing projects to a given specifications.
  4. Interpret construction information from blueprint drawings.
  5. Participate in the construction industry.

PSLO Assessment Report Summary

What we looked at:

The Carpentry certificate assessment focused on (PSLO #2) the use of hand and power tools and (PSLO #4) familiarizing and improving their hand skills in blueprint drawings. Listed below are the results for each of the PSLOs.

What we found:

  • The results of the written and practical exams showed that 4 (0 female; 4 males) out of 5 students (80%) got a "C" or better in using carpentry tools competently.
  • The results of the written and practical exams showed that 4 (0 female; 4 males) out of 5 students (80%) got a "C" or better in reading construction drawings.

What we are planning to work on:

  • Continue to provide up-to-date hands-on practices for hand tools and power tools so students will be competent when finishing from this program.
  • Continue provide the latest version of construction drawings for students to be familiarized themselves with before going into the real world of work.

Recommendations for students:

  • Students must follow the Carpentry program suggested schedule in the COM-FSM General Catalog in order to complete their study in a timely matter.
  • Students enrolled in this program as their major of study must remain in it until they graduate with a certificate of achievement.
  • Students must be pro-active in listening and asking questions during lecture and lab periods so they can gain and improve their knowledge and skills.

AP Full Official

Certificate of Achievement in Carpentry Program

Campus

Pohnpei Campus

AP Review Submission Date

October 3, 2016

Completed by

Xavier W. Yarofmal

AR Review Cycle

Fall 2014 - Spring 2016

Program Goals

Program goals are broad statements concerning knowledge, skills, or values that the faculty members expect the graduating students to achieve.

A. Program Goal

Its primary purpose is to provide students with marketable entry-level skills in the construction industry or any related field/career. It is designed to qualify students to take external licensure, vendor-based, or skill standards examinations in the field. If standardized external exams are not available in the field of study, the program prepares students at skill levels expected of employees in an occupation found in the local economy.

Program Learning Outcomes

1. Identify safety and occupational health requirements in the Carpentry trade.

2. Use competently specified hand and power tools.

3. Perform basic hand skills in constructing projects to given specifications.

4. Interpret construction information from blue print drawings.

5. Participate in the construction industry.

Source: COMFSM catalog.

Program History

This section describes the history of the program. This includes the date and reason of implementation, significant milestones in the development of the program, and significant current activities.

B. Program History

The program was created by recommendations of Pohnpei Campus Advisory Council to offer a certificate of achievement (COA) in carpentry to train local students to acquire skills in constructing cabinets, installing sub-floor, erecting walls, constructing roofing and interior finishing which are needed in the community.

Milestones:

2007—The program students were actively involved in the first Technology and Trade Exhibit event of the college.

2011—Students were actively involved in various activities such as building tables, benches, book selves, picture/map frames, and etc. for the college as well as the local community.

2012—Carpentry Instructor participated and completed a training in “arts envoy project” sponsored by the US Embassy.

2012—Students constructed three outdoor picnic benches for Pohnpei Campus.

2013—Students were involved actively in a project with the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) through the coordinator for the USAID-FEMA Disaster Mitigation, Response, and Reconstruction Program. They build a sample typhoon-resistant frame structure to be used on the outer islands.

2013—Carpentry Instructor attended and completed an intensive three-Saturdays training in “heavy equipment operator” conducted by Pohnpei Transportation Authority (PTA) senior operator.

2013—Students established their program student club.

2014—Students poured concrete footing for the typhoon-resistant frame structure to prevent the 4x4 wooden posts from termites attack.

2014—Students constructed a server room in the woodshop. They laid 4” Concrete Hollow Blocks for the partition/wall separating the server room from the static machines area.

2016—Students erected 2” metal pipes along the main road and in front of the mechanic and wood shops for future fence posts.

2016—Established Advisory Council for the program.

Source: Technology and Trade division monthly reports.

Program Description

The program description describes the program, including its organization, relationship to other programs in the system, program design, degree(s) offered, and other significant features of the program, such as elements/resources for forward-looking new program contributions to the state’s economy, or specialized program accreditation.

C. Program Description

Carpentry is one of the basic trades in the construction field. Students will be introduced to the techniques and methodology of component construction involving cabinet setout, sub-floor, wall construction, roofing and interior finishing.

Source: COMFSM catalog.

Program Admission Requirements

This section describes the requirements for admission into the program and other requisites.

D. Program Admission Requirements

A student must be a high school graduate or GED certificate holder. Applicants must take the COM-FSM entrance test (COMET) and be accepted by the Admissions Board. Acceptance by the Admissions Board is based on the applicant’s score on the COMET and other criteria as defined by the Admissions Board.

Source: COMFSM catalog.

Program Certificate/Degree Requirements

This section specifies the requirements for obtaining a certificate/degree in the program, including specific courses,, sequencing of courses, total credits, internships, practical, etc.

E. Program Certificate Requirements

Program requirements:

General Education Requirements:-----------13 credits

MS 104 Technical Math I (4)

  • Pre-requisite: MS 094 or placed at MS 100 level for Math on COMET

ESL 050 Technical English (3) or SS 100 World of Work (3)

CA 095 Computer literacy (3)

BU 097 Introduction to Entrepreneurship (3)

Technical Requirements: -----------21 credits

VAE 103 Blueprint Sketching and Interpretation (3)

VCT 154 Introduction to Masonry (3)

VCT 153 Introduction to Carpentry (3)

VCT 163 Concrete Form Construction (3)

VCT 173 Rough Framing and Exterior Finishing (3)

VCT 183 Finishing and Trim Work (3)

VCE 195 Construction Procedures (1.5)

VSP 153a Industrial Safety (1.5)

Total credits requirements: 34 credits

Suggested Schedule

Fall Semester

ESL 050 Technical English or SS 100 World of Work........... 3

MS 104 Technical Math I............................................................ 4

VAE 103 Blueprint Sketching and Interpretation.................... 3

VCT 153 Introduction to Carpentry........................................... 3

VSP 153a Industrial Safety…...................................................... 1.5

14.5

Spring Semester

VCT 163 Concrete Form Construction..................................... 3

VCT 173 Rough Framing and Exterior Finishing.................... 3

VCT 183 Finishing and Trim Work…....................................... 3

VCE 195 Construction Procedures.............................................1.5

VCT 154 Introduction to Masonry............................................. 3

13.5

Summer Session

CA 095 Computer Literacy......................................................... 3

BU 097 Introduction to Entrepreneurship.............................. 3

6

Source: COMFSM catalog.

Note: The pre-requisite course causes an additional 4 credits from the regular 34 credits requirement of the program.

Program Courses and Enrollment

This section lists courses offered in the program, including number of sections, course enrollment, section fill rates, and redundancy of courses across the institution.

F. Program Courses and Enrollment

Below are tables showing the program enrollment figures and number of sections:

Fall Semesters 2014-15 and Spring Semesters 2015-16

Fall Semester

Number of students

Number of sections

Spring Semester

Number of students

Number of sections

2014

82

6

2015

45

4

2015

66

5

2016

46

4

Source: IRPO Program Data Sheet for 2014-15.

Program Faculty

This section reports the faculty of the program, including full-time and part-time faculty. The degrees held and rank are provided for the full-time and part-time faculty. Finally, provide the faculty student ratio for the program.

G. Program Faculty

Program Faculty, Rank, Course(s) taught and Degree/Certificate

Faculty

Rank

Course(s) taught

Degree/Certificate

A. General Education

Ms. Debra Perman

Professor

BU097 Introduction to Entrepreneurship

M.B.A., Walden University

Mr. Alan Alosima

Professor

MS094 Intro. To Tech. Math I

MS104 Technical Math I

B.S.C.E., Manuel S. Enverga University

Mr. Taylor Elidok

Professor

ESL050 Technical English

SS100 World of work

M.A., San Diego State University

Ms. Phyllis Silbanuz

Professor

CA095 Basic Computer Application

M.S., Phoenix University

B. Technical Requirements

Mr. Xavier Yarofmal

Professor

VAE103 Blueprint Sketching and Interpretation

VCT153 Introduction to Carpentry

VCT154 Introduction to Masonry

VCT163 Concrete Form Construction

VCT173 Rough Framing and Exterior

VCT183 Finishing and Trim Work

VCE195 Construction Procedures

M. Ed., San Diego State University

Mr. Salba Silbanuz

Assistant Professor

VSP153a Industrial Safety

USDOL Journeyman in Building Maintenance & Repair

Student/Faculty Ratio

TERM

Student/Faculty Ratio

Fall 2014

14:1

Fall 2015

13:1

Spring 2015

11:1

Spring 2016

12:1

Source: COM-FSM catalog and IRPO Program Data Sheet for 2014-15.

H. Program Indicators

This section provides the data for analyzing the extent to which the program has achieved the established outcomes and criteria. This is the most important part of the program review. The data that will be collected and evaluated are the following:

1. Assessment of course student learning outcomes of program courses

Number and Percentage of Students Scoring 70% or Higher on the Assessments

Course & CSLO’s

Fall 2014

Spring 2015

Fall 2015

Spring 2016

VAE 103

N= 14

N=

N= 13

N=

CSLO 1

14 (100%)

13 (100%)

CSLO 2

14 (100%)

13 (100%)

CSLO 3

14 (100%)

13 (100%)

CSLO 4

14 (100%)

13 (100%)

CSLO 5

14 (100%)

13 (100%)

CSLO 6

14 (100%)

13 (100%)

VCE 195

N= 13

N=

N=

N= 12

CSLO 1

13 (100%)

11 (92%)

CSLO 2

13 (100%)

11 (92%)

CSLO 3

13 (100%)

11 (92%)

CSLO 4

13 (100%)

11 (92%)

CSLO 5

13 (100%)

11 (92%)

CSLO 6

13 (100%)

11 (92%)

CSLO 7

13 (100%)

11 (92%)

VCT 153

N= 14

N=

N= 13

N=

CSLO 1

14 (100%)

13 (100%)

CSLO 2

14 (100%)

13 (100%)

CSLO 3

14 (100%)

13 (100%)

CSLO 4

14 (100%)

13 (100%)

CSLO 5

14 (100%)

13 (100%)

CSLO 6

14 (100%)

13 (100%)

CSLO 7

14 (100%)

13 (100%)

VCT154

N= 13

N=3 (IS)

N=

N=10

CSLO 1

13 (100%)

3 (100%)

9 (90%)

CSLO 2

13 (100%)

3 (100%)

9 (90%)

CSLO 3

13 (100%)

3 (100%)

9 (90%)

CSLO 4

13 (100%)

3 (100%)

9 (90%)

CSLO 5

13 (100%)

3 (100%)

9 (90%)

VCT163

N=

N=14

N=11

N=

CSLO 1

14 (100%)

11 (100%)

CSLO 2

14 (100%)

11 (100%)

CSLO 3

13 (93%)

11 (100%)

CSLO 4

14 (100%)

11 (100%)

CSLO 5

13 (93%)

11 (100%)

CSLO 6

14 (100%)

11 (100%)

CSLO 7

14 (100%)

11 (100%)

VCT173

N=

N=14

N=

N=12

CSLO 1

13 (93%)

11 (92%)

CSLO 2

13 (93%)

11 (92%)

CSLO 3

13 (93%)

11 (92%)

CSLO 4

13 (93%)

11 (92%)

CSLO 5

13 (93%)

11 (92%)

CSLO 6

13 (93%)

11 (92%)

CSLO 7

14 (100%)

11 (92%)

VCT183

N=

N=14

N=

N=12

CSLO 1

13 (93%)

11 (92%)

CSLO 2

13 (93%)

11 (92%)

CSLO 3

13 (93%)

11 (92%)

CSLO 4

13 (93%)

11 (92%)

CSLO 5

13 (93%)

11 (92%)

CSLO 6

14 (100%)

11 (92%)

VSP153a

N=

N=

N=14

N=

CSLO 1

12 (86%)

CSLO 2

12 (86%)

CSLO 3

13 (93%)

CSLO 4

13 (93%)

CSLO 5

12 (86%)

Source: Tracdat and Course Level Assessment.

2. Assessment of program student learning outcomes

Program Outcome

Assessment Strategy

Target

Fall Results

Spring Results

1. Identify safety and occupational health requirements in the Carpentry trade.

Presentation/Performance - Instructor will observe students

during practical/hands-on exercises

that students use the proper

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

at all times using a safety check list.

80% of students registered in

this program must at least score 70%

or get a "C".

Fall 2015

13 out of 14 students (93%) completed this PSLO.

2. Use competently specified hand and power tools.

Presentation/Performance - Instructor will check that student use

the right tool for the right job assigned.

Project-Individual - Students will be assess on a weekly basis during lab hours on the use of each assign hand

and power tools.

Presentation/Performance - Students must select the right tool for the assign job/project.

80% of students registered in

this program must at least score 70%

or get a "C".

Fall 2015

13 out of 13 (100%) completed this PSLO.

Fall 2014

13 out of 14 students or 93% got a "C" or better in using

carpentry tools competently.

Spring 2016

11 out of 12 students (92%) completed this PSLO.

3. Perform basic hand skills in constructing projects to given specifications.

Project-Individual - Instructor will

check the student's finished product

if they follow all the specifications

given.

Written Assignment - Students will identify parts of a structure and estimate materials needed.

80% of students registered in

this program must at least score 70%

or get a "C".

Fall 2015

11 out of 11 (100%) completed this PSLO.

Spring 2016

11 out of 12 students (92%) completed this PSLO.

4. Interpret construction information from blue print drawings.

Written Assignment - Instructor will assess students by asking them to

draw or sketch the each of the three types of pictorial drawings which are perspective, isometric, oblique, and orthographic projection drawings.

Project-Individual - Each student will draw a pictorial drawing of an object/shape given to them.

Written Assignment - Students will

be asked to identify different symbols used on a given blueprint.

80% of students registered in

this program must at least score 70%

or get a "C".

Fall 2015

13 of 13 students (100%) completed the PSLO.

Fall 2014

14 out of 14 students or 100% got a "C" or better in reading construction drawings.

5. Participate in the construction industry.

80% of students registered in

this program must at least score 70%

or get a "C".

Source: Tracdat and Program Assessment Summary.

3. Program enrollment (historical enrollment patterns, student credits by major)

Enrollment by Major and Campus

TERM

ENROLLMENT/PNI

Fall 2014

20

Fall 2015

23

Spring 2015

20

Spring 2016

18

Students Credits by Major and Campus

TERM

CREDITS/PNI

Fall 2014

225

Fall 2015

244

Spring 2015

249

Spring 2016

185

Students Credits by Programs and Campus

TERM

CREDITS/PNI

Fall 2014

184.5

Fall 2015

154.5

Spring 2015

135

Spring 2016

191

Source: IRPO Program Data Sheet for 2014-15

4. Average class size

Program Sections, Enrollment Ratio and Average Class Size

Term

Section

Enroll Max

Enrollment

EnrollRatio

AvgClass Size

Fall 2014

6

90

82

91.1%

13.7

Fall 2015

5

75

66

88.0%

13.2

Spring 2015

4

48

45

93.8%

11.3

Spring 2016

4

60

46

76.7%

11.5

Source: IRPO Program Data Sheet for 2014-15

5. Course completion rate

Course Completion & Withdrawals (Majors)

Term

Students

ABCorP%

ABCDorP%

W_%

Fall

2014

61

80.3%

90.2%

6.6%

Fall

2015

75

84.0%

77.02%

2.67%

Spring 2015

77

85.7%

82.5%

6.8%

Spring 2016

66

80.3%

83.3%

3.0%

Course Completion & Withdrawals (Program)

Term

Students

ABCorP%

ABCDorP%

W_%

Fall

2014

82

97.6%

100.0%

0.0%

Fall

2015

66

97.0%

100.0%

0.0%

Spring 2015

45

68.4%

100.0%

8.0%

Spring 2016

46

91.3%

91.3%

0.0%

Course Completion & Withdrawal Rate (Program Course)

Term: Fall 2014

Course

Enroll

ABCorP

CC_%

W_%

VAE 103

14

14

100.0%

0.0%

VCT 153

14

14

100.0%

0.0%

VCT 154

13

13

100.0%

0.0%

VCE 195

13

13

100.0%

0.0%

Term: Fall 2015

Course

Enroll

ABCorP

CC_%

W_%

VAE 103

13

13

100.0%

0.0%

VCT 153

13

13

100.0%

0.0%

VCT 163

11

11

100.0%

0.0%

VSP 153a

14

14

100.0%

0.0%

Term: Spring 2015

Course

Enroll

ABCorP

CC_%

W_%

VCT 154

3

3

100.0%

0.0%

VCT 163

14

14

100.0%

0.0%

VCT 173

14

14

100.0%

0.0%

VWE 115

12

12

100%

0%

Term: Spring 2016

Course

Enroll

ABCorP

CC_%

W_%

VCE 195

12

11

92.0%

8.0%

VCT 154

10

9

90.0%

10.0%

VCT 173

12

11

92.0%

8.0%

VCT 183

12

11

92.0%

8.0%

Source: IRPO Program Data Sheet for 2014-15

6. Student persistence and retention rate

Persistence and retention rate

Degree

New FT Fall 2014

Persisted Spring 2015

Retained Fall 2015

Persistence Spring 2015

Retention Fall 2015

CA

9

8

4

89.0%

44.4%

Degree

New FT Fall 2015

Persisted Spring 2016

Persistence Spring 2016

CA

5

7

140.0%

Source: IRPO Program Data Sheet for 2014-15

7. Success rates on licensing or certification exams (CTE, TP, Nursing, etc)

There is no certification exam for our graduates develop yet, but we have a working group where they are working to seek for other third party certifications so this program can use.

8. Graduation rate based on yearly number

Graduation Rate

Major

Degree

Cohort

New FT Students

Grad_

100*

Grad_

150*

Grad_

200*

Carpentry

CA

Fall 2012

8

12.5%

25.0%

Carpentry

CA

Fall 2013

3

0.0%

0.0%

Carpentry

CA

Fall 2014

10

0.0%

10.0%

Carpentry

CA

Fall 2015

8

37.5%

Graduates by Major

Major

Degree

AY14/15

AY15/16

Carpentry

CA

1

4

Source: IRPO Program Data Sheet for 2014-15

9. Students seat cost

N/A

10. Cost of duplicate or redundant courses, programs or services

The carpentry and cabinetmaking programs are sharing one course which is VSP153a Industrial Safety.

11. Students’ satisfaction rate

Data below are obtained from the COMFSM students evaluation of instructor and course

Fall 2014

VAE103

VCE195

VCT153

VCT154

Average; this instructor was effective.

4.8

4.4

4.4

4.6

Average; this course was a valuable learning experience.

4.8

4.6

4.4

4.8

Average; course materials were relevant and useful.

4.5

4.3

4.3

4.7

Spring 2015

VCT154

VCT163

VCT173

VCT183

Average; this instructor was effective.

4.8

4.4

4.7

4.4

Average; this course was a valuable learning experience.

4.8

4.6

4.8

4.4

Average; course materials were relevant and useful.

4.5

4.3

4.7

4.3

Fall 2015

VAE103

VCT153

VCT163

VSP153a

Average; this instructor was effective.

4.2

4.3

4.4

4.6

Average; this course was a valuable learning experience.

4.3

4.3

4.4

4.4

Average; course materials were relevant and useful.

4.0

3.9

3.9

3.9

Spring 2016

VCT154

VCT173

VCT183

VCE195

Average; this instructor was effective.

4.4

4.4

4.3

4.3

Average; this course was a valuable learning experience.

4.4

4.5

4.4

4.3

Average; course materials were relevant and useful.

4.4

4.3

4.1

4.4

COM-FSM Student Evaluation of Instructor and Course

Instructor:_____________ Term & Year:____________

1= strongly disagree 2= disagree 3= neutral 4= agree 5= strongly agree NA= not applicable

Instructor

  1. Overall, this instructor was effective.
  2. The instructor welcomed and encouraged questions and comments.
  3. The instructor presented the course content clearly.
  4. The instructor emphasized the major points and concept.
  5. The instructor was always well prepared.
  6. The instructor made sure that the students were aware of Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) for the course.
  7. The instructor gave clear directions and explained activities or assignments that emphasized the course SLOs.
  8. The instructor planned class time and assignments that encouraged problem solving and critical thinking.
  9. The instructor demonstrated thorough knowledge of the subject.
  10. I received feedback on assignments/quizzes/exams in time to prepare for the next assignment/quiz/exam.

Course

  1. Overall, this course was a valuable learning experience.
  2. The course syllabus was clear and complete.
  3. The student learning outcomes were clear.
  4. The SLOs helped me focus in this course.
  5. Classes started and ended on time.
  6. Assignments, quizzes, and exams allowed me to demonstrate my knowledge and skills.
  7. The testing and evaluation procedures were fair.
  8. There was enough time to finish assignments.
  9. Expectations were clearly stated.

Course Materials

  1. Course materials were relevant and useful.
  2. The textbook for this course was appropriate for this level of course.
  3. The assigned readings were relevant and useful.
  4. The on-line resources were relevant and useful.
  5. The course on-line grade book ( Please check which one) __ Course Sites __ Edmodo __ Engrade __ Jupiter __ Schoology ___Other ( Please specify ____) was satisfactory.

Course feedback:

Instructor feedback:

Course Material:

Other Comments:

Source: COMFSM student evaluation of instructor and course.

12. Alumni data

Degree: Certificate of Achievement in Carpentry Program

Name/Graduates

Year Graduated

Municipality/Country

1. Isiel, Atrick

Fall 2000

Madolenihmw

2. Albert, Swingly

Spring 2001

Uh

3. Epina, Benster

Spring 2001

Nett

4. Henly, Molten

Spring 2001

Kitti

5. Inoke, Person

Spring 2001

Madolenihmw

6. Johnny, Silpaster

Spring 2002

Sokehs

7. Cava, Kaiava

Summer 2002

Fiji

8. Ladore, Jason

Spring 2003

Uh

9. Samuel, Sepester

Spring 2003

Kolonia

10. Solomon, Stance

Spring 2010

Sokehs

11. Martin, Patrick

Spring 2013

Sokehs

12. Amyda, Jaymina

Fall 2013

Kolonia

13. Washington, Leonard

Fall 2013

Kitti

14. Optaia, Heinstain

Fall 2015

Kolonia

15. Head, Norvian

Spring 2016

Kolonia

16. Linos, Presley

Spring 2016

Sokehs

17. Phillip, Elton

Spring 2016

Uh

Source: COM-Pohnpei Campus OAR.

13. Employment data and employer feedback (employer survey)

Name/Graduates

Employer

Amyda, Jaymina

Family store casher

Optaia, Heinstain

Island Spring Water Company

Linos, Presley

Sea Breeze Hotel –security

Phillip, Elton

Super savers

14. Program at nearby regional institutions

Carpentry Technology

Honolulu Community College

Carpentry Technology

Only Degree That Can Be Earned:

Associate in Applied Science (AAS)

Brief Program Description/Goals:

Entrance into the carpentry trade is usually obtained through serving a four-year indentured apprenticeship. The Carpentry Department offers a program of instruction which, when successfully completed, provides an excellent background for those desiring to enter the Apprenticeship Program. Industry standards and safety regulations are emphasized.

Information About The Program:

• Program Level-- Undergraduate Certificate. Program Length-- 18 Months. The job placement rate for students who completed this program is 0%.

Itemized Estimate of Educational Costs:

• Tuition based on total credits taken.

• Approximately $460 for the first year and $50 for each succeeding year. (Books and Supplies- $510)

Program Prerequisites or Co-requisite:

• ENG 100 with 100Tor ESL 13 & 14, OR Placement in ENG 100 with ENG 100S or ESL 23;

• MATH 50, OR Placement into MATH 150 or higher.

CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY
Certificate

Guam Community College

Carpentry Technology

Certificate

Brief Program Description/Goals:

The Certificate in Construction Technology Program will prepare students to trades for the current local and global job market with entry-level knowledge and skills needed for any of the following fields: carpentry, electricity, heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC); masonry, plumbing, reinforcing metal worker, and welding. All students must successfully pass for core courses (technical related requirements) with a “C” or better before enrolling in one of the seven concentration areas.

Information About The Program:

Upon successful completion of the Certificate in Construction Technology program, students will be able to:

1. Demonstrate basic skills needed to function as an entry-level worker in at least one construction trades concentration area in accordance with industry safety standards: carpentry; electricity; heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC); masonry; plumbing, reinforcing metal worker; or welding.

2. Exhibit entry-level knowledge in chosen construction trades concentration area.

3. Demonstrate professionalism as related to the construction trades industry.

Itemized Estimate of Educational Costs:

• Tuitions and Fees: $4,224.00

• Room and Board: $10,500.00

Program Prerequisites or Co-requisite:

Students must demonstrate proficiency in reading, writing, understanding, and speaking English as indicated by one of the following:

1. Test out of the English Placement Test, or

2. Satisfactory completion of EN 100 courses, and

3. Satisfactory completion of MA 108 or test out of the math placement test

Check for the possible competitor among other nearby colleges

15. Transfer rate

Most of the graduates in the program are transferring to our AAS Building Technology, majoring in Electricity.

Analysis

Findings

This section provides discussion of information discovered as a result of the evaluation such as problems or concerns with the program and what part of the program is working well and meeting expectation.

1. Assessment of course student learning outcomes of program courses

· All CSLO’s were assessed on time and met the targets.

2. Assessment of program student learning outcomes

· All PSLO’s were assessed on time and met the targets.

3. Program enrollment

· The enrollment of new students in fall semesters has been a great challenge. There were no new students enrolled in fall 2016 semester. Carpentry courses were cancelled due to this problem.

4. Average class size

· The minimum of ten students per course during Spring 2015, Fall 2015, and Spring 2016 were met.

· Some semesters less than ten new students and the rest will be continuing students.

5. Course completion rate

· There were high course completion rates from all students who registered in all the technical program courses.

· Most students were having problems with their general education courses specifically the Technical Math MS104.

· Most students enrolled in this program are the low achievers; this is the main reason why they can’t complete the general education courses.

6. Student persistence and retention rate

· There is a good persistence and retention rate during AY2014-AY2015 and poor result during AY2015-AY2016.

· Most students stopped attending school once they finished their technical courses requirements.

7. Success rates on licensing or certification exams

· There is no certification exam for our graduates develop yet, however the division create a working group to look into the possibilities of a third party certification.

8. Graduation rate based on yearly number

· There is 1 student graduated during AY14/15 and 4 students during AY15/16.

9. Students seat cost

  • No data

10. Cost of duplicate or redundant courses, programs or services

· Carpentry and Cabinetmaking programs are sharing VSP153a Industrial Safety.

11. Students’ satisfaction rate

· There were very good satisfaction rate based on the students course evaluation conducted during the period of this program review.

12. Alumni data

· There were 17 alumni of this program since it was started.

13. Employment data and employer feedback (employer survey)

· There were 4 graduates in the program that are currently working here on Pohnpei.

14. Program at nearby regional institutions

Honolulu Community College: The job placement rate for students who completed this program is 0%.

15. Transfer rate

· Most of the graduates in the program are transferring to our AAS Building Technology major in Electricity.

Recommendations

This section provides recommendations from the program on what to do to improve or enhance the quality of program and course learning outcomes as well as program goals and objectives. This section should also include suggestions that describe how the program might be able to create opportunities for a better program in the future. Some examples are exploring alternate delivery mechanisms, forming external partnerships, or realigning with other programs.

1 . Assessment of course student learning outcomes of program courses

  • Update all CSLOs that were not yet updated.

2. Assessment of program student learning outcomes

· Maintain assessment on time. Make sure to upload data on tracdat.

3. Program enrollment

· Recruit students interested in program only, and work closely with the vocational programs at both public high schools and private high schools to identify potential students.

4. Average class size

· Formulate better recruitment strategies during registration period.

5. Course completion rate

  • Collect data on time.

6. Student persistence and retention rate

· Improve the courses sequence of the program and the persistence and retention rate will improve too.

7. Success rates on licensing or certification exams

  • Find a third party certification.

8. Graduation rate based on yearly number

· Needs to improve the graduation rate of the program.

  • Recruit better students from the high schools.

9. Students seat cost

  • No data

10. Cost of duplicate or redundant courses, programs or services

· VSP153a will be still shared by carpentry and cabinetmaking programs.

11. Students’ satisfaction rate

· Develop a better student satisfaction survey method.

12. Alumni data

  • Maintain data collections.

13. Employment data and employer feedback

· Continue conducting the employment survey for our graduates.

14. Program at nearby regional institutions

· Align our curriculum to the Honolulu Community College and Guam Community College carpentry programs.

15. Transfer rate

  • Create a degree program for Carpentry Program.






Draft submission: May 12, 2016

Final draft submission:

Unit Assessment Report

Report Period: 2013-2014

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