Public Health Program

  • PSLO
  • Data Sheet
  • Program Review
  • Assessment Report

Program Student Learning Outcomes Assessment
(AY 2019-2020)

Program Student Learning Outcomes(PSLOs)

At the completion of Public Health Program the student will be able to:

  1. Recognize, describe and discuss the basic public health science facts and principles
  2. List and discuss the essential public health functions and their interrelationships at community and district level
  3. Describe and discuss adult, children and family health issues
  4. Discuss and demonstrate an understanding and practice of some generic public health competencies
  5. Demonstrate proper public health skills for public health practice in the community as a state or local public health officer
  6. Discuss and demonstrate community and cultural sensitivity in the health care environment
  7. Describe and discuss the health determinants and problems of adults, children and families
  8. Demonstrate proper cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and first aid techniques
  9. Demonstrate the ability and discuss how to make a community diagnosis based on the determinants of health
  10. Identify and demonstrate good public health practice
  11. Have had work experience at a public health facility at community and district levels

What we worked on based on the SY 2018-2019 findings:

  1. Incorporating more student activities and application of the topics discussed into real-life setting
  2. Collaboration with Pohnpei State Public Health services in providing community health services and community needs assessment and diagnosis
  3. Development of instruction methods that improve student knowledge and engagement, analytical skills and promote participatory learning and a more flexible methods of teaching such as: simulation, community projects, groups activities, etc. should be established
  4. Proposal for changes in the program was submitted and pending approval

Result of the changes and improvements:

  1. Students were taking part of several community assessment and diagnosis where they were able to practice the theory and knowledge they learned from the lecture, this led to a better student engagement and learning.
  2. Most Public Health courses that were offered used problem-based learning, case scenarios, simulations and group activities where students applied the skill and knowledge they have acquired in class. This led to better students’ engagement and learning.
  3. Tutoring services for the student. This service aims to help students with issues in their class and help student review the topics discussed in their class. Started in Spring 2019, student have started availing the service and we are trying to improve the service and remove the stigma that “tutoring” has on students to increase the number of participants.

PSLO Assessment Report Summary (AY2019-2020)

What we looked at:

The Public Health Program assessment focused on PSLOs 2, 7, and 9.

Students who are taking courses related to PSLO2 should be able to list and discuss the essential public health functions and their interrelationships at community and district level. Students will be able to list their roles as public health practitioner based on the health issues they will identify when they do their community health assessment survey. Successful completion of this objective will be indicated by more than 85% of students enrolled in courses related to SPLO2 be able to list and discuss the essential public health functions and their interrelationships at community and district level when given the task to perform a community health assessment survey.

Students who are taking courses related to PSLO7 should be able to describe and discuss the health determinants and problems of adults, children and families; Successful completion of this objective will be indicated by more than 80% of students enrolled in courses related to SPLO7 be able to describe and discuss the health determinants and problems of adults, children and families when doing oral reports in response to direct questions related to these topics; being able to identify health issues in quizzes and exams with multiple choice questions related to these topics; and be able to differentiate the health issues in the different age groups.

Students taking courses related to PSLO9 should be able to demonstrate the ability to make and discuss community diagnosis based on the determinants of health. Students were asked to develop a plan for community health assessment and implement this plan to place a control measure and deliver a preventive measure in that community based on the assessment findings. Student also delivered health education in public schools located in Kitti and Kolonia. Successful completion of this objective will be indicated by more than 80% of students enrolled in courses related to SPLO9 will be able to make a community diagnosis when given a case scenario and discuss these during problem based learning discussion. Student learning will be evaluated based on their ability to complete a diagnosis based on skills check list and rubrics during discussions.

What we found:

PSLO#2:
Students who were taking courses related to this PLO were able to list and discuss the essential public health functions and their interrelationships at community and district level

PH 109: Total number of students: 18
Number of students who passed: 18
Passing rate: 100%
PH 151: Total number of students: 7
Number of students who passed: 7
Passing rate: 100%
PH 231: Total number of students: 5
Number of students who passed: 5
Passing rate: 100%
PH 241: Total number of students: 4
Number of students who passed: 4
Passing rate: 100%

PSLO#7:
Students who took courses related to this PLO were able to describe and discuss health determinants and problems of adults, children and families. This was shown in their community health assessment survey project where they were able to identify health issue in an identified community and placed control measures for the identified health issues

PH 131: Total number of students: 9
Number of students who passed: 9
Passing rate: 100%
PH 141: Total number of students: 6
Number of students who passed: 6
Passing rate: 100%
PH 211: Total number of students: 4
Number of students who passed: 4
Passing rate: 100%
PH 212: Total number of students: 7
Number of students who passed: 7
Passing rate: 100%

PSLO #9:
Students were able to demonstrate the ability to make and discuss community diagnosis based on the determinants of health. Students enrolled in these courses were able to plan a community health assessment and implement control measures based on the result of the health assessment survey

PH 121: Total number of students: 1
Number of students who passed: 1
Passing rate: 100%
PH 211: Total number of students: 4
Number of students who passed: 4
Passing rate: 100%
PH 212: Total number of students: 7
Number of students who passed: 7
Passing rate: 100%
PH 221: Total number of students: 3
Number of students who passed: 2
Passing rate: 66%
PH 231: Total number of students: 5
Number of students who passed: 5
Passing rate: 100%

What are we planning to work on

Continue with the tutoring services for the public health students.

Strengthen the collaboration of the PHTP with Pohnpei Division of Public Health and other allied health offices (Environmental Protection Agency, Island Food Group, etc.) to have students join these agencies during inspection, program planning and implementation. To also include these allied health offices in their community health projects.

Continue in delivering course in problem-based learning format and improve on the scenarios being used as problems

Recommendations for students:

Students must have a good background in statistics and medical terminologies

Students must have good reading comprehension and writing skills.

Program Evaluation

Associate of Science in Public Health

Campus: National Campus

AP Review Submission Date

August 2016

Completed by: Paul Dacanay

AR Review Cycle

2014- 2016

Program Mission

“PHTP endeavors to provide students of varied educational background the opportunity to pursue comprehensive and high-quality training in public health, and to provide the Federated States of Micronesia and surrounding Pacific Island nations with a workforce of capable public health professionals.”

Program Goals

1. Recognize, describe and discuss the basic public health science facts and principles;

2. List and discuss the essential public health functions and their interrelationships at community and district level;

3. Describe and discuss adult, children and family health issues;

4. Discuss and demonstrate an understanding and practice of some generic public health competencies;

5. Demonstrate proper public health skills for public health practice in the community as a state or local public health officer;

6. Discuss and demonstrate community and cultural sensitivity in the health care environment;

7. Describe and discuss the health determinants and problems of adults, children and families;

8. Demonstrate proper cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and first aid techniques;

9. Demonstrate the ability and discuss how to make a community diagnosis based on the determinants of health;

10. Identify and demonstrate good public health practice;

11. Have had work experience at a public health facility at community and district levels.

Program History

The Public Health Training program constitutes an academic response to the public health situation in Micronesia and has taken account the current academic realities of the region. There has been a recognized chronic shortage of health workers coupled by the marked under-training of those workers, who have, in large part, learnt through “on-the-job” training, frequently from predecessors also trained “on-the-job”.

The college added the Public Health Training Program to its program offerings in Fall of 2009.

Program Description

Public Health Training program is a multi-entry, multi-exit educational opportunity for high school graduates who wish to enter studies in the health domain, as well as Health Workers who wish to enhance the effectiveness of their work and improve their working conditions.

The immediate aim of the program is to enhance the knowledge, skills and capabilities of the current public health workforce in the health administration of FSM and a medium to long aim of the program is to attract young candidates, whose interest would gravitate towards health and, possibly, towards public health, being the “replacement” workforce of the future, and equip them with more substantial academic foundation for a more effective work performance, both in the public as well as in the private sectors.

Program Admission Requirement

Entry criteria:

High school graduation or GED

All candidates to sit College of Micronesia Entry Test [COMET] and gain admission to COM-FSM Degree programs

OR

Diploma in Public Health or in Public Health Specialty OR

A qualification in Public Health equivalent to those above

AND

Appropriate Public Health Experience of at least six (6)

years

Program Degree Requirement

Total credit required: 65 Credits

Ten (10) courses or twenty-nine (29) credits in General Education Core Requirements:

EN 110: Advance Reading (3)

EN 120a: Expository Writing I (3)

CA 100: Introduction to Computing (3)

ESS 100: Exercise and Sports Science, any 100-level course (1)

PH/MS 109: Math for Health Science (3)

EN 120b: Expository Writing II (3)

SC 117: Tropical Pacific Islands Environment (4)

ESS/SC 200: Fundamental of Wellness and Physical Fitness (3)

SS 150: History of Micronesia (3)

Humanities (3)

Twelve (12) courses or thirty-six (36) credits in Major Core requirements

PH 111: Introduction to Basic Epidemiology and Biostatistics (3)

PH 112: Introduction to Epi-Info and Computing for Public Health (3)

PH 121: Environmental Prevention and Control of Disease (3)

PH 131: Food and Nutrition in the Lifecycle (3)

PH 141: Principles of Health Promotion (3)

PH 151: Introduction to Pacific Health Care Systems and Traditional

Medicine (3) or

PH 152: Practical Health Service Management (3)

PH 211: Health Research Methodology (3)

PH 212: Surveillance, Identification and Management of an Outbreak

(3)

PH 221: Occupational Health and Safety (3)

PH 231: Food Nutrition and Lifestyle Disease (3)

PH 241: Case Studies and Special Issues in Health Promotion (3)

PH 251: Management of Health Information System

Program Course and Enrollment

Courses

Number of section/s

Course Enrollment

Section fill-rates

PH 109: Math for Health Science

4

64

64%

PH 111: Introduction to Basic Epidemiology and Biostatistics

4

48

48%

PH 112: Introduction to Epi-Info and Computing for Public Health

2

19

48%

PH 121: Environmental Prevention and Control of Disease

2

31

62%

PH 131: Food and Nutrition in the Lifecycle

2

30

60%

PH 141: Principles of Health Promotion

3

43

60%

PH 151: Introduction to Pacific Health Care Systems and Traditional Medicine

3

37

61%

PH 152: Practical Health Service Management

0

0

0

PH 211: Health Research Methodology

2

19

49%

PH 212: Surveillance, Identification and Management of an Outbreak

2

20

40%

PH 221: Occupational Health and Safety

2

26

51%

PH 231: Food Nutrition and Lifestyle Disease

2

32

64%

PH 241: Case Studies and Special Issues in Health Promotion

2

25

50%

Program Faculty

Instructor

Position

Degrees Held

Status

Paul Dacanay

Division Chair

Assistant Professor

Doctor of Medicine

Bachelor of Science Degree Major in Biology

Full time Faculty

Ikoli Ilongo

Instructor

Doctor of Education

Masters in Public Health

Full time Faculty

Robert Spegal

Instructor

Masters in Public Health

Part-time Instructor

Brian Mangum

Professor

Masters of Science

Visiting Professor

Program Indicators

I. Assessment of Course Student Learning Outcomes of program courses

Course Student Learning Outcome PH 109

SLO 1

SLO2

SLO 3

SLO 4

SLO 5

SLO 6

SLO 7

SLO 8

Number of Students

Spring 2014

90%

90%

95%

95%

100%

90%

95%

95%

24

Fall 2014

88%

85%

100%

88%

100%

90%

88%

95%

10

Spring 2015

87%

90%

95%

95%

100%

90%

97%

94%

12

Fall 2015

90%

90%

95%

95%

100%

95%

95%

95%

9

Spring 2016

80%

90%

100%

95%

100%

90%

90%

91%

9

Average

87%

89%

97%

94%

100%

91%

93%

94%

Course Student Learning Outcome PH 111

SLO 1

SLO2

SLO 3

SLO 4

SLO 5

SLO 6

Number of Students

Spring 2014

90%

95%

90%

90%

100%

95%

11

Fall 2014

100%

95%

85%

90%

95%

95%

8

Spring 2015

83%

92%

85%

83%

92%

100%

14

Fall 2015

100%

85%

90%

100%

100%

100%

8

Spring 2016

95%

90%

90%

90%

95%

95%

7

Average

94%

91%

88%

91%

96%

97%

Course Student Learning Outcome PH 112

SLO 1

SLO2

SLO 3

SLO 4

Number of Students

Fall 2014

100%

100%

100%

95%

16

Fall 2015

100%

100%

100%

100%

3

Average

100%

100%

100%

98%

Course Student Learning Outcome PH 121

SLO 1

SLO2

SLO 3

SLO 4

SLO 5

Number of Students

Fall 2014

92%

100%

100%

96%

100%

16

Fall 2015

96%

96%

100%

100%

100%

15

Average

94%

98%

100%

98%

100%

Course Student Learning Outcome PH 131

SLO 1

SLO2

SLO 3

SLO 4

SLO 5

SLO 6

Number of Students

Fall 2014

100%

96%

95%

100%

96%

95%

21

Fall 2015

90%

100%

95%

100%

100%

95%

9

Average

95%

98%

95%

100%

98%

95%

Course Student Learning Outcome PH 141

SLO 1

SLO2

SLO 3

SLO 4

SLO 5

Number of Students

Spring 2014

100%

98%

95%

95%

95%

25

Spring 2015

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

12

Spring 2016

95%

95%

98%

95%

95%

6

Average

98%

98%

98%

97%

97%

Course Student Learning Outcome PH 151

SLO 1

SLO2

SLO 3

SLO 4

SLO 5

Number of Students

Spring 2014

95%

95%

95%

95%

95%

22

Spring 2015

100%

87%

100%

100%

100%

8

Spring 2016

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

7

Average

98%

94%

98%

98%

98%

Course Student Learning Outcome PH 211

SLO 1

SLO2

Number of Students

Fall 2014

100%

100%

15

Fall 2015

100%

100%

4

Average

100%

100%







Course Student Learning Outcome PH 212

SLO 1

SLO2

SLO 3

SLO 4

SLO 5

Number of Students

Fall 2014

90%

90%

90%

90%

90%

12

Fall 2015

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

7

Average

95%

95%

95%

95%

95%

Course Student Learning Outcome PH 221

SLO 1

SLO2

SLO 3

SLO 4

Number of Students

Spring 2014

90%

90%

90%

90%

14

Spring 2015

100%

100%

100%

100%

9

Spring 2016

66%

66%

66%

66%

3

Average

85%

85%

85%

85%

Course Student Learning Outcome PH 231

SLO 1

SLO2

SLO 3

SLO 4

SLO 5

Number of Students

Spring 2014

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

8

Spring 2015

95%

100%

100%

95%

100%

19

Spring 2016

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

5

Average

98%

100%

100%

98%

100%

Course Student Learning Outcome PH 241

SLO 1

SLO2

SLO 3

SLO 4

Number of Students

Spring 2014

100%

100%

100%

100%

10

Spring 2015

100%

100%

100%

100%

12

Spring 2016

100%

100%

100%

100%

1

Average

100%

100%

100%

100%

II. Assessment of Program Student Learning Outcomes

Associates of Science Degree in Public Health

What we looked at:

The Public Health Program assessment focused on PSLOs 1, 2, 4, and 8.

Students who are taking courses related to PSLO1 should be able to recognize, describe and discuss the basic public health science, facts and principles. Successful completion of this objective will be indicated by more than 80% of students enrolled in courses related to SPLO 1 be able to report and describe these topics; be able to present their research on basic health sciences facts and principles; and be able to apply these principles when engaging in scenarios and simulations.

Students who are taking courses related to PSLO2 should be able to list and discuss the essential public health functions and their interrelationships at community and district level. Students will be able to list their roles as public health practitioner based on the health issues they will identify when they do their community health assessment survey. Successful completion of this objective will be indicated by more than 85% of students enrolled in courses related to SPLO2 be able to list and discuss the essential public health functions and their interrelationships at community and district level when given the task to perform a community health assessment survey.

Students who are taking courses related to PSLO 3 should be able to describe and discuss health issues in the different age groups. Successful completion of this objective will be indicated by more than 80% of students enrolled in courses related to SPLO3 be able to discuss health issues when doing oral reports in response to direct questions related to these topics; being able to identify health issues in quizzes and exams with multiple choice questions related to these topics; and be able to differentiate the health issues in the different age groups.

Students who are taking course related to PSLO 4 should be able to discuss and demonstrate an understanding and be able to practice some generic public health competencies. Successful completion of this objective will be indicated by more than 80% of students enrolled in courses related to SPLO4 will be able to discuss and demonstrate an understanding of generic public health competencies. These will be evaluated by students’ individual portfolio based on a rubric; assessment of their skills in practicing some generic public health competencies during simulations based on a skills checklist; and how they response during case scenarios based on a rubric.

Students who are taking courses related to PSLO7 should be able to describe and discuss the health determinants and problems of adults, children and families; Successful completion of this objective will be indicated by more than 80% of students enrolled in courses related to SPLO7 be able to describe and discuss the health determinants and problems of adults, children and families when doing oral reports in response to direct questions related to these topics; being able to identify health issues in quizzes and exams with multiple choice questions related to these topics; and be able to differentiate the health issues in the different age groups.

Students taking courses related to PSLO9 should be able to demonstrate the ability to make and discuss community diagnosis based on the determinants of health. Students were asked to develop a plan for community health assessment and implement this plan to place a control measure and deliver a preventive measure in that community based on the assessment findings. Student also delivered health education in public schools located in Kitti and Kolonia. Successful completion of this objective will be indicated by more than 80% of students enrolled in courses related to SPLO9 will be able to make a community diagnosis when given a case scenario and discuss these during problem based learning discussion. Student learning will be evaluated based on their ability to complete a diagnosis based on skills check list and rubrics during discussions.

What we found:

PSLO #1:

Students who were taking courses related to this PLO were able to recognize, describe and discuss the basic public health science, facts and principles.

PH 111

Total number of students

16

Number of students who passed:

16

PH 121

Total number of students

15

Number of students who passed:

14

PH 141

Total number of students:

11

Number of students who passed:

10

PSLO #2

Students who took these courses submitted their research report and graded based on a rubric

PH 151

Total number of students

7

Number of students who passed:

7

PH 231

Total Number of students:

5

Number of students who passed:

5

PSLO #3

Students who took courses related to this PLO were able to describe and discuss health issues in the different age groups

PH 211

Total number of students

14

Number of students who passed:

12

PSLO # 4

Students were able to discuss and demonstrate an understanding and be able to practice some generic public health competencies and present their portfolio that includes discussions and copies of their report to their mentors with satisfactory grades given by the mentors based on a rubric.

PH 131:

Total number of students

Number of students who passed

19

19

III. Program Enrollment

The AS in Public Health program have shown a decreasing trend in enrollment in the two-year period. Fall 2014 has shown a drastic decrease in enrollment followed by another decrease in the Fall 2015. The trend of Fall semester having a higher enrollment than spring continues most likely due to the enrollment of freshmen.

Program

Term

Sections

Maximum Enrollment

Enrollment

Enrollment Ratio

Enrollment Average

Associate of Science in Public Health

Spring 2014

5

125

114

91.2%

22.8

Fall 2014

7

170

82

48.0%

11.7

Spring 2015

5

115

86

75.0%

17.2

Fall 2015

7

170

55

32.0%

8.0

Spring 2016

5

115

38

33.0%

7.6

IV. Course Completion Rate

Course completion rate were based on passing a course with a grade of ABC or D.

For courses in the AS in Public Health, the average completion rate in Spring 2014 was 83.5%, which was higher than the completion rates at the college [78%]. The average completion rate went down in the next semester. However, the average course completion rate for the 2 year period is 82%.

Program

Term

Course

Number of Students

Completion Rate

Associate of Science in Public Health

Spring 2014

PH 109

24

87.0%

PH 111

11

63.6%

PH 141

25

80.0%

PH 151

22

91.0%

PH 221

14

85.7%

PH 231

9

87.5%

PH 241

10

90%

Fall 2014

PH 109

6

66.7%

PH 111

8

100.0%

PH 112

10

70.0%

PH 121

16

87.5%

PH 131

21

52.4%

PH 212

10

50.9%

Spring 2015

PH 109

12

83.3%

PH 111

14

71.4%

PH 141

12

91.7%

PH 151

8

75.0%

PH 221

9

88.9%

PH 231

19

57.9%

PH 241

12

83.3%

Fall 2015

PH 109

9

87.5%

PH 111

8

85.0%

PH 112

3

66.6%

PH 121

15

100%

PH 131

9

100%

PH 212

7

100.0%

Spring 2016

PH 109

9

76.2%

PH 111

7

77.3%

PH 141

6

81.3%

PH 151

7

71.4%

PH 221

3

100%

PH 231

5

100%

PH 241

1

100%

V. Student Persistence Rate

Program

Term

Persistence Rate

Associate of Science in Public Health

Spring 2014

Fall 2014

200%

Fall 2014

Spring 2015

133.3%

Spring 2015

Fall 2015

98%

Fall 2015

Spring 2016

83.8%

VI. Student Retention Rate

Program

Term

Retention Rate

Associate of Science in Public Health

Spring 2014

Spring 2015

150%

VII. Employment Data and Feedback

The Pohnpei State Public Health recently submitted a feedback for the Public health graduates who are presently working with them. They rate the graduates very satisfactory with regards to their knowledge of the job. They recommend that Public Health students should also be trained in the clinical aspect of Public health and not only management.

VIII. Success rates on licensing or certification exams

There is no current licensing or certification examination for Public health at FSM.

IX. Graduation Rate

Program

Term

Number of Graduates

Associates of Science in Public Health

Spring 2014

3

Fall 2014

2

Spring 2015

3

Fall 2015

4

Spring 2016

3

X. Student Seat Cost

No data available for the 2 year review period.

XI. Cost of duplicate or redundant courses, programs or services

There are no duplicated or redundant courses for Public Health

XII. Revenue Generated by the Program

Tuition

Grant income

Spring 2014

Fall 2014

$404,959 (AHEC)

Spring 2015

Fall 2015

$241,296 (AHEC)

Spring 2016

XIII. Students’ satisfaction rate

In the 2014 Student Satisfaction Survey done by the College, it shows that majority of the students strongly agree or agree that the program have performed well in in serving their students.

XIV. Alumni data

2 graduates working for Yap State Hospital

2 graduates pursuing Nutrition undergraduate courses in UH (Both graduated. One is pursuing his MPH at UH Manoa and the other is pursuing her BBMS at FNU)

1 graduate pursuing Public Health undergraduate courses in UOG, presently doing her Internship at Pohnpei Public Health

2 AS in PH graduates pursuing Public Health and Rehabilitation undergraduate course in FNU (Both graduated in Fall 2015; One pursuing his BBMS at FNU and the other is in Chuuk applying for a job)

2 Health workers graduated and are back with the Department of Health

5 graduates working with Pohnpei Division of Public Health

XV. Program added or cancelled at nearby regional institutions (PCC, GCC, Hawaii schools, UOG, CMI, NMC)

Palau Community College have started offering Associates Degree in Public Health. The College of the Marshall Islands has started offering 2 courses that leads to a Certificate of Achievement in Public Health.

XVI. Transfer Rate

Most of the graduates who pursued their education in another institution claimed that most of their courses was transferable to the said institution

Analysis and Recommendation

Low enrollement rate is an issue for the Public Health programs. The Program should undertake a more aggressive recruitment and information drive activities. This should be done in all FSM States once every academic year

A more diligent screening of applicants regarding the required prerequisites that the student should have prior to acceptance to the program. This includes Statistics, Anatomy and Physiology, General Chemistry, Human Nutrition courses.

Good academic advisement prior to enrolling in PH courses should also be considered. An early warning program should be established to capture those who are at risk of dropping from the program.

Development of instruction methods that improve student knowledge and engagement, analytical skills and promote participatory learning and a more flexible methods of teaching such as: lectures, videos, group activities, simulations, in-class assignments, homework, quizzes, impromptu tests etc. should be established

In addition to the present program and course assessment strategy, a comprehensive assessment/exam to evaluate the overall knowledge/skills the students gained should be developed.

Unit Assessment Report

Report Period: 2013-2014

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