Motor Vehicle Mechanic

  • PSLO
  • Data Sheet
  • Program Review
  • Assessment Report

Program Student Learning Outcomes Assessment
(AY 2019-2020)

Program Student Learning Outcomes(PSLOS)

At the completion of Motor Vehicle Mechanic the student will be able to:

  1. Identify safety and occupational health requirements in the specific trade area being studied.
  2. Use competently the specified hand and power tools.
  3. Read and interpret information from technical drawing related to the respective trade.
  4. Perform hand skills in their respective trade.
  5. Participate in their respective trade.

PSLO Assessment Report Summary

What we looked at:

The motor vehicle mechanic certificate assessment focused in all PSLO’s of the program as mentioned above. Below is the result for each of the PSLO’s.

What we found:

PSLO1: Safety
2 out 2 students or 100% got a grade of "C" or better in the VTM_103_CSLO_3, when given practical tasks, the instructor will evaluate the students using the safety checklist used in the trade.

PSLO2: Hand and power tools
2 out 2 students or 100% got a grade of "C" or better in the VTM_103_ CSLO_1, when given a car, tools, and equipment, the students will demonstrate the proper uses and operations of the hand and power tools.

PSLO3: Read and interpret technical drawing
2 out 2 students or 100% got a grade of "C" or better in VTM_104_CSLO_2, when given a starter motor, the student will check the carbon brush, field coil, armature, bushing and front frame.

PSLO4: Perform hand skills
4 out 4 students or 100 % got a grade of "C" or better in the VTM_101_CSLO_1, when the student will perform engine tune-up by following the steps provided by the manufacturer specifications.

PSLO5: Participate in the trade
4 out of 4 or 100% of students got "C" or better as their final grade in VTM_102_CSLO_4, when the student will perform automobile servicing own by the community.

What we are planning to work on:

  • Provide a check- list for PPE for every student to use before lab periods.
  • Provide a complete set of tools and equipment for students to practice their estimating skills.

Recommendations for students:

Students must follow the Motor Vehicle Mechanic Program suggested schedule in the COM-FSM General Catalog in order to complete their study in a timely matter. Students enrolled in this programmed should emphasized hands on practical work as regular worker on the auto-mechanic industry.

AP Full Official

Certificate of Achievement in Career Education with Emphasis on Motor Vehicle Mechanics

Campus

Pohnpei Campus

AP Review Submission Date

September 23, 2016

Completed by

Nestor Mangubat

AR Review Cycle

AY- 2014-2016

(2 cohort)

Program Goals

Program goals are broad statements concerning knowledge, skills, or values that the faculty members expect the graduating students to achieve.

A. Program Goal:

This program is designed to develop an understanding of the basic purpose, construction, operation and service of component parts and assemblies of an automobile. Students will develop the knowledge and skills required to disassemble, inspect, reassemble and perform basic repairs and maintenance on motor vehicle units and components.

Program Learning Outcomes:

1. Identify safety and occupational health requirements in the specific trade area being studied.

2. Use competently specified hand and power tools.

3. Read and interpret information from technical drawings related to the respective trade.

4. Perform hand skills in their respective trades.

5. Participate in the respective trade.

Program History

This section describes the history of the program. This includes the date and reason of implementation, significant milestones in the development of the program, and significant current activities.

Fall Semester 2005, Spring 2006, Summer 2006 –first program offering;

Fall 2006 –was not offered to pave way for offering of new program -Small Engine Equipment &

Outboard Motor Repair;

Fall 2007 –this program was offered from then on

Course outlines were made following the program learning objectives under the Certificate of

Achievement in Career Education, which already existed in the COM-FSM catalogue. It was designed to have a maximum student seating of ten (10). There were ten (10) first batched of students during Fall 2005.

Significant milestones / current activities:

Since its implementation, students were involved in various activities such as repairs and maintenance services of vehicles from the community, college faculty, staff and including college vehicles. Fabrication of trainers that were shown during the annual Technology & Trade Exhibit was started since 2007 up to the present. During its maiden year, a move was made to initiate support from the public to donate their used cars for students to work on. Generous donors answered the call and the college received six (6) cars that were dismantled by the students and work-study groups. These assemblies and components were made as laboratory trainers for students.

The United States Department of Agriculture (Pohnpei) donated one Toyota Pick-up for students learning and college use in the year 2011. Students repaired the vehicle and now used as college transport at Pohnpie Campus.

In Spring 2013 Mr. Robert Orosco a Filipino, donated one diesel engine for students’ practical hands on.

In fall 2013 Mr. Mangubat and his worked-study students made training mock up of one Nissan Engine with complete accessories that they got from junkyard at Nett’s Area. This helps the students for engine starting & ignition system.

In Summer 2013, VTM-103 students made another electrical mock- up for practical activity. This auto-electricity mock –up helps the students to learn and have actual practice in lighting & car electrical system.

Those mock-ups and practical hands on helped the students to be interested in the program.

In 2014, MVM became more progressive as many students wanted to enroll because they also heard good things about the program. During this year, additional mock up was made which is Toyota 5A with complete set of rotating stand for engine overhauling. We also made steering and suspension assembly with complete set of frame.

For more development of the MVM Program, it created CTE Servicing during 2015 wherein the students accepted some job order from nearby community. Students just accept car for repair that is related in their current discussion to help more in their practical hands on.

2016 – Re-established the MVM program advisory council.

Program Description

The program description describes the program, including its organization, relationship to other programs in the system, program design, degree(s) offered, and other significant features of the program, such as elements/resources for forward-looking new program contributions to the state’s economy, or specialized program accreditation.

Designed to develop an understanding of the basic purpose, construction, operation and service of

Component parts and assemblies of an automobile. Students will develop the knowledge and skills

Required to disassemble, inspect, reassemble and perform basic repairs and maintenance on motor vehicle units and components IN CERTIFICATION OF ACHIEVEMENT IN CAREER EDUCATION WITH EMPHASIS IN MOTOR VEHICLE MECHANIC.

Program Admission Requirements

This section describes the requirements for admission into the program and other requisites.

High school graduate or GED certificate holder. Applicants must take the COM-FSM Entrance Test (COMET) and be accepted by the Admissions Board. Acceptance by the Admissions Board is based on the applicant’s score on the COMET and other criteria as defined by the Admissions Board.

Program Certificate/Degree Requirements

This section specifies the requirements for obtaining a certificate/degree in the program, including specific courses,, sequencing of courses, total credits, internships, practical, etc.

General Education Requirements:

ESL 050 Technical English (3)

MS 104 Technical Math (4)

  • Pre-requisite: MS 094 or placed at MS 100 level for Math on COMET

CA 100 Computer Literacy (3)

BU 097 Introduction to Entrepreneurships (3)

Technical Requirements:

VTM 101 Intro to Motor Vehicle Mechanics (4)

VTM 102 Fuel, engine cooling, and power train systems (4)

VTM 103 Ignition, electrical, and transmission systems (4)

VTM 104 Brakes, steering, suspension and wheel alignment (4)

VTM 150 Cooperative Education (6)

Total requirements: 35 credits

Suggested schedule:

Fall

ESL 050 Technical English (3)

MS 104 Technical Math (4)

VTM 101 Intro to Motor Vehicle Mechanics (4)

VTM 102 Fuel, engine cooling, and power train systems (4)

Spring

CA 095 basic computer application (3)

BU 097 Introduction to Entrepreneurships (3)

VTM 103 Ignition, electrical, and transmission systems (4)

VTM 104 Brakes, steering, suspension and wheel alignment (4)

Summer

VTM 150 Cooperative Education (6)

Program Courses and Enrollment

This section lists courses offered in the program, including number of sections, course enrollment, section fill rates, and redundancy of courses across the institution.

Fall semesters 2014-15 and spring semesters 2015-16

Fall Semester

Number of students

Number of sections

Spring Semester

Number of students

Number of sections

2014

32

3

2015

23

2

2015

30

2

2016

30

2

Sources of Information MVM program data sheets from Fall-2014- Spring 2016

Program Faculty

This section reports the faculty of the program, including full-time and part-time faculty. The degrees held and rank are provided for the full-time and part-time faculty. Finally, provide the faculty student ratio for the program.

Program Faculty

Full Time Faculty

Nestor H. Mangubat- Bachelor of Science in Industrial Education

Major in Automotive Technology

Batangas State University, Philippines.

Alan Alosima – ------ Associate Professor

BSCE, Manuel S. Everga University, Philippines

Student and faculty ratio 1:15

Source: COMFSM personal Listing

Program Indicators

This section provides the data for analyzing the extent to which the program has achieved the established outcomes and criteria. This is the most important part of the program review. The data that will be collected and evaluated are the following:

1. Assessment of course student learning outcomes of program courses

Number and Percentage of Students Scoring 70% or Higher on the Assessments

Course & CSLO’s

Fall 2014

Spring 2015

Summer 2015

Fall 2015

Spring 2016

VTM 101

N= 14

N=

N=

N= 15

N=

CSLO 1

14 (100%)

13 (87%)

CSLO 2

14 (100%)

13 (87%)

CSLO 3

14 (100%)

13 (87%)

VTM 102

N= 13

N=

N=

N= 15

N=

CSLO 1

13 (100%)

13 (87%)

CSLO 2

13 (100%)

13 (87%)

CSLO 3

13 (100%)

13 (87%)

CSLO 4

13 (100%)

13 (87%)

CSLO 5

13 (100%)

13 (87%)

VTM 103

N=

N= 12

N=

N=

N= 14

CSLO 1

12 (100%)

14 (100%)

CSLO 2

12 (100%)

10 (71%)

CSLO 3

12 (100%)

10 (71%)

VTM 104

N=

N= 11

N=

N=

N= 14

CSLO 1

9 (82%)

14 (100%)

CSLO 2

9 (82%)

10 (71%)

CSLO 3

9 (82%)

10 (71%)

VTM 150

N=

N=

N= 9

N=

N=

CSLO 1

9 (100%)

CSLO 2

9 (100%)

CSLO 3

9 (100%)

2. Assessment of program student learning outcomes

Program Outcome

Assessment Strategy

Target

Fall 2014 Results

Spring 2015 Results

Identify safety and occupational health requirements in the specific trade area being studied.

Given a practical task, the instructor will evaluate the students using the safety checklist used in the trade.

70% of all the students registered in this program must pass this PSLO.

Spring 2016

10 out 14 students or 71% got a grade of "C" or better in the VTM_103_ CSLO3

Spring 2015

9 out 11 students or 82% got a grade of "C" or better in the VTM_103_ CSLO3

Use competently specified hand and power tools.

Given a car, tools, and equipment, the students will demonstrate the proper uses and operations of the hand and power tools.

70% of all the students registered in this program must pass this PSLO.

Spring 2016

14 out 14 students or 100% got a grade of "C" or better in the VTM_103_ CSLO1

Spring 2015

9 out 11 students or 82% got a grade of "C" or better in the VTM_103_ CSLO1

Read and interpret information from technical drawings related to the respective trade.

Given a starter motor, the student will check the carbon brush, field coil, armature, bushing and front frame.

70% of all the students registered in this program must pass this PSLO.

Spring 2016

10 out 14 students or 71% got a grade of "C" or better in the VTM_104_ CSLO2

Spring 2015

9 out 11 students or 82% got a grade of "C" or better in the VTM_104_ CSLO2

Perform hand skills in their respective trades.

The student will perform engine tune-up by following the steps provided by the manufacturer specifications.

70% of all the students registered in this program must pass this PSLO.

Fall 2015

13 out 15 students or 87% got a grade of "C" or better in the VTM_101_ CSLO1

Fall 2014

14 out 14 students or 100% got a grade of "C" or better in the VTM_101_ CSLO1

Participate in the respective trade.

The student will perform automobile servicing own by the community.

70% of all the students registered in this program must pass this PSLO.

Fall 2015

13 out 15 students or 87% got a grade of "C" or better in the VTM_102_ CSLO4

Fall 2014

13 out 13 students or 100% got a grade of "C" or better in the VTM_102_ CSLO4

3. Program enrollment (historical enrollment patterns, student credits by major)

Enrollment by Major and Campus

Degree

Term

Chuuk

Kosrae

National

Pohnpei

Yap

Students

CA

Fall 2014




27


27

CA

Fall 2015




23


23

CA

Spring 2015




17


17

CA

Spring 2016




22


22

IRPO PROGRAM DATA SHEET FOR 2014-15

Credits by Major and Campus

Degree

Term

Chuuk

Kosrae

National

Pohnpei

Yap

Credits

CA

Fall 2014

261.5

261.5

CA

Fall 2015

260

260

CA

Spring 2015

173

173

CA

Spring 2016

210

210


Credits by Program and Campus

Degree

Term

Chuuk

Kosrae

National

Pohnpei

Yap

Credits

CA

Fall 2014

144

144

CA

Fall 2015

120

120

CA

Spring 2015

92

92

CA

Spring 2016

210

210

IRPO PROGRAM DATA SHEET FOR 2014-15

4. Average class size

Table 3 Program Sections, Enrollment Ratio and Average Class Size

Term

Section

Enroll Max

Enroll ment

Enroll Ratio

Avg.Class Size

Fall 2014

3

40

32

80%

10.7

Fall 2015

2

30

30

100%

15

Spring 2015

2

30

23

76.7%

11.5

Spring 2016

2

30

30

100%

15

5. Course completion rate

Course Completion & Withdrawals (Major)

Term

Students

ABCorP%

ABCDorP%

W%

Fall 2014

59

72.9%

86.4%

6.8%

Fall 2015

69

65.2%

80.21%

7.25%

Spring 2015

42

61.9%

84.1%

6.5%

Spring 2016

54

61.11%

63.0%

20.4%

Course Completion & Withdrawals (Program)

Term

Students

ABCorP%

ABCDorP%

W%

Fall 2014

33

93.9%

93.9%

3.0%

Fall 2015

30

86.7%

86.7%

0%

Spring 2015

23

82.6%

82.6%

0%

Spring 2016

30

80.0%

80.0%

6.7%

Course Completion & Withdrawal by Program course

Term

Course

Enrollment

ABCorP

CC _%

W_%

Fall-2014

VTM-101

14

14

100 %

0%

VTM-102

13

13

100%

0%

Fall-2015

VTM-101

15

13

86.7%

0%

VTM-102

15

13

86.7%

0%

Spring-2015

VTM-103

12

12

100%

0%

VTM-104

11

9

82%

18%

Sum-2015

VTM-150

9

9

100%

0%

Spring-2016

VTM-103

14

12

80%

20%

VTM-104

14

12

80%

20%

Sum-2016

VTM-150

5

5

100%

0%

6. Student persistence and retention rate

Degree

New FT Fall 2014

Persisted Spring 2015

Retained Fall 2015

Persistence Spring 2015

Retention Fall 2015

CA

4

4

3

4

75.0%

Degree

New FT Fall 2015

Persisted Spring 2016

Persistence Spring 2016

CA

10

12

120%

Source: IRPO information Data Sheet

7. Success rates on licensing or certification exams (CTE, TP, Nursing, etc)

There is no certification for our graduates developed yet for motor vehicle technician we need agency that can implement the process of testing or community college that our student takes that examination.

8. Graduation rate based on yearly number

Four graduates of Certificate of Achievement in Career Education with Emphasis on Motor Vehicle Mechanics, three from 2012 Spring Semester and one from Fall 2013 merely the following:

Graduation Rate

Term

Major

Degree

Cohort

Grad_

100*

Grad_

150*

Grad_

200*

2014.3

MVM

CA

14

0.0%

14.3%

2015.3

MVM

CA

15

13.3%

0.0%

2016.2

MVM

CA

Graduates by Major

Major

Degree

AY14/15

AY15/16

MVM

CA

1

2

Source: IRPO Program Data Sheet for 2014-15

9. Students seat cost

10. Cost of duplicate or redundant courses, programs or services

Not available at this time.

11. Students’ satisfaction rate

Data below are obtained from students evaluation

Course

Fall 2014

Spring 2015

Fall 2015

Spring 2016

VTM 101

5

3.9

VTM 102

5

4.4

VTM 103

5

4.98

VTM 104

4.99

4.82

1 = Never 2 = Rarely 3 = Sometimes 4 = Usually 5 = Always

1. Keeps regular schedule, every class day.

2. Shows interest in the subject.

3. Gives individual help as needed.

4. Avails himself/herself for student conference.

5. Welcomes questions, suggestions and discussions from students.

6. Shows interest and respect for students.

7. Helps the students in meeting individual learning needs.

8. Uses classroom/lab time fully.

9. Provides clear directions for assignment and instruction.

10. Grades fairly and frequently.

11. Makes the purpose of the course clear.

12. Talks clearly and at an easy-to-follow speed.

13. Lessons are well paced with activity as well as lecture.

14. Makes the course interesting.

15. Textbooks were appropriate and helpful.

12. Alumni data

Degree: Motor Vehicle Mechanics

Name/Graduates

Year Graduated

Municipality

Jim, Gibson

2014 Fall

kosrae

Peniknos, Aileen

2014 Fall

kitti

Ramsin, Radson

George, Ryan

Lotte, Kezin

Aia, Ben

Johnny, Jkson

2014 Fall

2015 Fall

2015 Fall

2016 Spring

2016 spring

Sohkes

Sokes

Kosrae

Sokes

Kapingga

13. Employment data and employer feedback (employer survey)

Name/Graduates

Employer

Rodson Rocson

MASCOT Auto Repair Shop, Pohnpei

Chochol Agustin

MASCOT Auto Repair Shop, Pohnpei

Ryan George

MASCOT Auto Repair Shop, Pohnpei

Nelper Jordy

USA

Mike Lawrence

Guam, USA

Kariti Batikari

NAPA Auto Parts Store, Pohnpei

Kevin Sephin

ACE Mechanic Shop, Pohnpei

Aldis Allen Michael

MASCOT Auto Repair Shop, Pohnpei

14. Program added or cancelled at nearby regional institutions

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION: The Automotive Technology (AMT)

Program at Honolulu CC is a comprehensive five-semester

Program master certified by the National Automotive

Technology Education Foundation (NATEF) that prepares students for employment as automotive technicians. Students completing the program may earn a Certificate of Achievement after one semester or an Associate in Applied Science degree upon program completion. The program has maintained its NATEF certification since 1993, undergoing a review every five years. It is certified in all eight ASE areas: engine repair, automotive transmission and transaxle, manual drive train and axles, suspension and steering, brakes, electrical/electronics systems, heating and air conditioning, and engine performance.

PROGRAM STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (SLO): Upon successful completion of the AMT program, students will be able to:

• Gain employment in the automotive industry in any of the eight NATEF areas: engine repair, Automatic transmission/transaxle, manual drive train and axles, suspension and steering, brakes, Electrical/electronics systems, heating and air conditioning, and engine performance;

• Increase their marketability through learning time management and team work skills; and,

• Gain personal knowledge and experience in vehicle repair.

RECOMMENDED HIGH SCHOOL PREPARATION: Pre-Algebra, Electronics, Chemistry or Physics,

Industrial Arts.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS:

Program Prerequisites:

Valid driver’s license 1

ENG 19 and/or ENG 21, OR ESL 13 & 14, OR Placement in ENG 22/60 or ESL 23

“C” or higher in MATH 25 or in 50 or in 53, OR Placement in higher MATH

Certificate of Completion Credits Associate in Applied Science Degree Credits

General Education Requirement – Quantitative or Logical Reasoning *

MATH 197

Technical Math II 3

First Semester

AMT 20 Introduction to Automotive Mechanics (2) 2

AMT 53 Brakes (5) 5

AMT 55 Suspension and Steering (5) 5

PHYS 100 & 100L; or PHYS 197E

Survey of Physics

Survey of Physics Lab

Fundamentals of Physics for Electronics and Lab 4 (12) 16

Second Semester

AMT 46 Powertrain and Manual Transmissions 5

AMT 50 Automatic Transmissions/Transaxles 7

WELD 16 Or WELD 19

Welding for AMT Majors

Welding for Trades and Industry 1-3

General Education Requirement – Social Science * 3 16-18

Third Semester

AMT 30 Engines 8

AMT 40 Electrical Systems I 4

General Education Requirement (ENG 100/120) * 3 15

Fourth Semester

AMT 42 Electrical Systems II 8

AMT 43 Air Conditioning 4

General Education Requirement * 3 15

Fifth Semester

AMT 67 Engine Performance 12

AMT 93V Cooperative Education 1-4 13-16

Minimum Credits Required 78-83

1 Driver’s license must remain valid throughout the time the student is in the program.

* General Education Requirements for the AAS degree are listed under DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES.

Note: Students must meet the minimum proficiency standards in communication and computation established by

Honolulu CC to qualify for the AAS degree.

_________________________________________________________________________________

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION: Automotive Service Technology Certificate

Program at GCC (GUAM COMMUNITY COLLEGE)

Program Mission

The mission of the Automotive program is to develop a skilled and competent automotive workforce, based on industry needs, for the Guam community and the region.

Program Description

The Certificate program in Automotive Service Technology (AST) is a competency-based program designed to offer entry-level training sufficient for employee success in automotive technician positions. Skills acquired in this program also apply directly to occupational areas including diesel mechanics, small engine repair, generator repair, marine engine service, fleet service, repair service order writing, and entry level automotive service management.

Graduates of the AST Certificate program demonstrate the foundational skill and knowledge to pursue further study in power plant mechanics, marine / diesel repair and automotive engineering in the automotive manufacturing industry.

Two ‘tracks’ exist within the program. Students completing the General Service Technician Track offer future employers preparatory background in four primary areas of automotive service technology (brakes, electrical / electronic systems, engine performance, and suspension / steering) and are prepared to pass the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) Certification Examination in those areas. Upon passage, and after one year of automotive work experience, they are eligible to receive NATEF designation as a General Service Technician. The second option within the Certificate program is the Master Service Technician track, where graduates receive preparatory background in the four above-mentioned automotive areas as well as four additional areas (automatic transmission / transaxle, engine repair, heating / air conditioning, and manual drive trains / axles). These graduates are prepared to pass the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) Certification Examination in all eight examination areas offered, and upon passage may pursue recognition from ASE as a Master Service Technician.

Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the Certificate in Automotive Service Technology program, students will be able to:

  1. Identify the purposes and proper functioning of the core components of an automotive engine.
  2. Perform a cylinder compression-cranking test.
  3. Demonstrate the proper use of a digital multi-meter (DMM) during diagnosis of electrical circuit problems.
  4. Diagnose, adjust, repair, or replace automotive components.

A. General Education Requirements


Students must demonstrate proficiency in reading, writing, understanding and speaking English as indicated by the following:

  • Test out of the English Placement Test, or
  • Satisfactory completion of EN 100 courses, and
  • Satisfactory completion of MA 108 or test out of the math placement test.

Total General Education Requirements - 3


Note to students: The credits in parenthesis above count only for billing purposes and student semester load. They do not count toward credits needed for any degree or certificate.

B. Technical Requirements


1. General Service Technician


Total Technical Requirements - 31


Total Credits Required - 34


2. Master Service Technician


The Master Service Technician Certificate Track requires completion of all courses required for the General Service Technician Track, plus all of the following:

Total Technical Requirements - 53


Total Credits Required - 56


__________________________________________________________________________________

PALAU COMMUNITY COLLEGE

AM – Automotive Mechanics

Course ID

Course Name

Prerequisite

Total Credits

Lab Credits

AM 101

VEHICLE OPERATION


2

1

AM 110

AUTOMOTIVE MECHANICS FOR NON-MAJORS


3

1

AM 111

BASIC AUTOMOTIVE MAINTENANCE


3

2

AM 112

ENGINE SERVICING I


2

1

AM 124

DRIVE TRAIN SERVICING


2

1

AM 125

AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRICITY


3

2

AM 126

ENGINE SERVICING II

AM 112

3

1

AM 213

AUTOMOTIVE AIR CONDITIONING


3

2

AM 214

ELECTRONIC ENGINE MANAGEMENT

AM 112, AM 125

3

2

AM 215

AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION

AM 124

3

1

AM 225

AUTOMOTIVE COMPUTER CONTROL SYSTEM

AM 112, AM 125

3

1

AM 226

ELECTRONICALLY CONTROLLED TRANSMISSION

AM 215, AM 125

3

1

AM 227

TRACTION CONTROL

AM 111, AM 125

3

1

AM 228

INTERNSHIP

Advisor's Consent

4

4

15. Transfer rate

No existing record regarding transfer rate.

Analysis

Findings

This section provides discussion of information discovered as a result of the evaluation such as problems or concerns with the program and what part of the program is working well and meeting expectation.

Findings are the following:

1. Assessment of course student learning outcomes of program courses

· All CSLO’s were assessed on time and met the targets.

2. Assessment of program student learning outcomes

· All PSLO’s were assessed on time and met the targets.

3. Program enrollment

· Enrollment in this period of program review was found in normal rate.

4. Average class size

· The minimum of ten students per course was met during Fall 2014 and Spring 2015 while the maximum number of students was reached during Fall 2015 and Spring 2016.

5. Course completion rate

· There were a high course completion rates from all students who registered in all the technical program courses.

· Most students were having problems with their general education courses specifically the Technical Math MS104.

6. Student persistence and retention rate

· There is a good persistence and retention rate during AY2014-AY2015 and AY2015-AY2016.

· Most students are stopped attending school once they finished their technical courses requirement.

7. Success rates on licensing or certification exams

· There is no certification exam for our graduates develop.

8. Graduation rate based on yearly number

· There is 1 student graduated during AY14/15 and 2 students during AY15/16.

9. Students seat cost

  • No data

10. Cost of duplicate or redundant courses, programs or services

  • No data

11. Students’ satisfaction rate

· There were very good satisfaction rate based on the students course evaluation conducted during the period of this program review.

12. Alumni data

· There were 7 alumni of this program since it was started in Fall 2005.

13. Employment data and employer feedback (employer survey)

· There were 8 graduates and students in the program that are currently working in the motor vehicle mechanic field.

14. Program at nearby regional institutions

· Honolulu Community College serves as the State of Hawai‘i’s exclusive provider of college level training in Motor vehicle Mechanic program.

15. Transfer rate

· No transfer rate data, most of the graduates in the program are working upon finishing the program.

Recommendation are the following:

· Select students that are interested to learn on MVM program.

· Seek third party certification for automotive student.

· Student should finish all general academic requirements for MVM before taking cooperative education or OJT.

· Need more tools and equipment for student hands-on.

· More time for hands-on activity.

· MVM program should align in other institution or school.







Draft submission: May 12, 2016

Final draft submission:

Unit Assessment Report

 

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College of Micronesia-FSM is accredited by the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges,
Western Association of Schools and Colleges, 10 Commercial Bldv., Suite 204, Novato, CA 94949, (415) 506-0234,
an institutional accrediting body recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation and the U.S. Department of Education.
Additional information about accreditation, including the filing of complaints against member institutions, can be found at: www.accjc.org