MNV-132: Radiotelephony

GENERAL INFORMATION:

Course title: MNV 132 Radiotelephony

Campus:   FSM FMI

Initiator:   Alvin Sinem

Date: May 2016

Course description
This course is intended to provide the learner with the knowledge and skills required to safely and correctly operate a ship borne radio station in matters relating to distress and routine messages, maritime safety information, as well as other related uses, in accordance with applicable national and international regulations.

SPC Module Name & Code:  SPC 024 Radiotelephony   SPC Required Contact Hrs. – 21

COURSE HOURS/CREDITS:

 

 

Hours per Week

 

No.  of Weeks

 

Total Hours

 

Semester Credits

Lecture

 

          2

x

16

=

32

=

 

Practicum

 

          4

x

16

=

64

=

 

Lecture/Prac

 

 

x

 

=

96

=

 

Workshop

 

 

x

 

=

 

=

 

 

 

 

 
Total  Semester Credits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PURPOSE OF COURSE:        
[   ] Degree requirement
[   ] Degree elective
[X] Certificate      Certificate of Achievement – Class 6 Master
[X] Other             A required course for the issuance of Certificate of Competency in Navigation (Class 6 Master) by the FSM Transportation, Communications and Infrastructure.

PREREQUISITES: All Basic Safety and Watchkeeping Rating Deck

 

PSLOS OF OTHER PROGRAMS THIS COURSE MEETS:


PSLO#

                             Program

 

 

INSTITUTIONAL STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

[x  ]

1. Effective oral communication: capacity to deliver prepared, purposeful presentations designed to increase knowledge, to foster understanding, or to promote change in the listeners’ attitudes, values, beliefs, or behaviors.

 

[  x ]

2. Effective written communication: development and expression of ideas in writing through work in many genres and styles, utilizing different writing technologies, and mixing texts, data, and images through iterative experiences across the curriculum.

[    ]

3. Critical thinking: a habit of mind characterized by the comprehensive exploration of issues, ideas, artifacts, and events before accepting or formulating an opinion or conclusion.

[    ]

4. Problem solving: capacity to design, evaluate, and implement a strategy to answer an open-ended question or achieve a desired goal.

 

[    ]

5. Intercultural knowledge and competence: a set of cognitive, affective, and behavioral skills and characteristics that support effective and appropriate interaction in a variety of cultural contexts.

 

[ x ]

6. Information literacy: the ability to know when there is a need for information, to be able to identify, locate, evaluate, and effectively and responsibly use and share that information for the problem at hand.

[x   ]

7. Foundations and skills for life-long learning: purposeful learning activity, undertaken on an ongoing basis with the aim of improving knowledge, skills, and competence.

 

[    ]

8. Quantitative Reasoning: ability to reason and solve quantitative problems from a wide array of authentic contexts and everyday life situations; comprehends and can create sophisticated arguments supported by quantitative evidence and can clearly communicate those arguments in a variety of formats.

PROGRAM STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (PSLOs): The student will be able to: 

  • Demonstrate knowledge, skills and understanding in safe management and operation of a vessel of not more than 80 gross tons by:
  • Setting up and correctly operating navigational and communication equipment;
  • Maintaining the good stability of a vessel in compliance with national and international requirements;
  • Planning and conducting the coastal passage of a vessel.

 COURSE STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (CSLOs) (General): The student will be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge and skills in adjusting and maintaining marine radio equipment to ensure optimum performance.
  • Describe operating radio equipment in accordance with General Regulations.
  • Demonstrate knowledge and skills in the use of correct operating procedures when conducting routine communications.
  • Describe correct operating procedures when conducting distress communications.
  • Demonstrate knowledge and skills in the use of correct operating procedures when conducting urgency communications.
  • Describe correct operating procedures when sending and receiving safety signals.
  • Describe the operation of several types of Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs) to give maximum effect.
  •  Describe correct techniques in conducting public correspondence communications.
  • Demonstrate the ability to use digital selective callings (DSC) operating procedures, particularly those relating to distress, urgency and safety.

COURSE STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (CSLOs) (Specific): The student will be able to:

CSLO (General) 1: Demonstrate knowledge and skills in adjusting and maintaining marine radio equipment to ensure optimum performance.

Student Learning Outcome (specific)

ISLO

PSLO

Assessment Strategies

    • Describe the propagation of MF, HF and VHF radio signals.

 

1,2,6,7

1

Written and oral assessments will be used to assess students’ competence in:

  • describing the propagation of MF, HF, and VHF in writing, oral, or sketch;
  • describing the function of a radio transmitter, receiver, antenna, earth power supply, microphone, and fuse;
  • describing lead acid battery construction, charging, maintenance and stowage; and
  • describing precautions against chemical burn and explosive hazards.

Practical assessment checklists will be used to assess students’ competence in demonstrating:

  • function and correct operation of transceiver controls
  • calculation of power and voltage using series and parallel wiring of batteries; and
  • basic fault finding procedures.
    • Outline functions of a transmitter, receiver, antenna, earth, power supply, microphone and fuse.
    • Demonstrate the function and correct operation of transceiver controls.
    • Describe lead acid battery construction, charging, maintenance and stowage.
    • Demonstrate calculation of power and voltage using series and parallel wiring of batteries.
    • Describe precautions against chemical burn and explosive hazards.
    • Demonstrate basic fault finding procedures

 

CSLO (General) 2: Describe operating radio equipment in accordance with General Regulations

Student Learning Outcome (specific)

ISLO

PSLO

Assessment Strategies

    • Define the ultimate authority of the ships master over radio communications.

1,2,6,7

1

Written and oral assessments will be  used to assess students’ competence in:

  • defining the ultimate authority of the ships master over radio communications;
  • describing the obligation to preserve the secrecy of communications;
  • describing severe penalties for the transmission of false or deceptive distress, urgency or safety signals;
  • stating the prohibition of unnecessary, profane and obscene transmissions;
  • defining the need to avoid unnecessary interference; and
  • describing the requirement to identify each and every transmission with ships call sign.
    • Describe the obligation to preserve the secrecy of communications.

 

    • Describe severe penalties for the transmission of false or deceptive distress, urgency or safety signals.
    • State the prohibition of unnecessary, profane and obscene transmissions.
    • Define the need to avoid unnecessary interference.
    • Describe the requirement to identify each and every transmission with ships call sign.

CSLO (General) 3: Demonstrate knowledge and skills in the use of correct operating procedures when conducting routine communications

Student Learning Outcome (specific)

ISLO

PSLO

Assessment Strategies

3.1 Demonstrate Correct usage of the phonetic alphabet.

1,2,6,7

1

Written and oral assessments will be used to assess students’ competence in:

  • describing the difference between a calling frequency and a working frequency;
  • defining procedures to be used when repeating calls;

 

  • stating the reasons for silence periods, designated frequencies, timing and duration; and
  • describing frequency monitoring requirements and techniques for use in difficult communications conditions.

 

Practical assessment checklists will be used to assess students’ competence in demonstrating:

  • correct usage of the phonetic alphabet;
  • use of correct test transmission procedures; and
  • correct terminology and procedure for calling and replying.
    • Describe the distinction between calling and working frequencies.

3.3 Demonstrate the use of correct test transmission procedures.

3.4 Demonstrate the correct terminology and procedure for calling and replying.

    •  Define procedures to be used when repeating calls.
    • State the reasons for silence periods, designated frequencies, timing and duration.
    • Describe frequency monitoring requirements and techniques for use in difficult communications conditions.

CSLO (General) 4: Describe correct operating procedures when conducting distress communications.

Student Learning Outcome (specific)

ISLO

PSLO

Assessment Strategies

    • Describe the absolute priority of distress communications over all other traffic.

1,2,6,7

1

Written and oral assessments will be used to assess students’ competence in:

  • describing the absolute priority of distress communications over all other traffic;
  • specifying the reason for the authority of the Master, Skipper or person responsible for the safety of a vessel is required before transmission of a distress call;
  • stating the international distress frequencies;
  • describing the content of a distress call and message;
  • stating and demonstrating procedures to be used when acknowledging distress traffic; and
  • describing procedures for control of distress traffic, distress safety, distress relay procedures and restricted working procedures.
    • Specify the reason for the authority of the Master, Skipper or person responsible for the safety of a vessel is required before transmission of a distress call.

4.3  State the international distress frequencies.

    • Describe the content of a distress call and message.
    • State procedures to be used when acknowledging distress traffic.

 

    • Explain procedures for the control of distress traffic, distress relay procedures and restricted working procedures.

CSLO (General) 5: Demonstrate knowledge and skills in the use of correct operating procedures when conducting urgency communications.

Student Learning Outcome (specific)

ISLO

PSLO

Assessment Strategies

  • Define the circumstances when an urgency signal can be used.

1,2,6,7

1

Written and oral assessments will be used to assess students’ competence in:

  • defining situations when an urgency call can be used;
  • detailing the urgency signal and message content in accordance with the prescribed format;
  • listing frequency to be used; and
  • defining authority for the transmission of urgency signals.

Practical assessment checklists will be used to assess students’ competence in demonstrating the use of an urgency message call to obtain urgent medical advice using VHF, and MF/HF.

  •  Demonstrate the use of an urgency message to obtain urgent medical advice.
  • Detail the urgency signal and message content.
  • List frequencies to be used.
  • Define authority for the transmission of urgency signals.

CSLO (General) 6: Describe correct operating procedures when sending and receiving safety signals.

Student Learning Outcome (specific)

ISLO

PSLO

Assessment Strategies

6.1 Define the circumstances when a safety signal can be used.

1,2,6,7

1

Written and oral assessments will be used to assess students’ competence in:

  • defining the circumstances when a safety signal can be used;
  • detailing the contents of a safety call and message; and
  • listing frequencies available for use.

6.2 Detail the contents of a safety call and message.

6.3 List frequencies available for use.

CSLO (General) 7: Describe the operation of several types of Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs) to give maximum effect.

Student Learning Outcome (specific)

ISLO

PSLO

Assessment Strategies

    • Explain the basic operational characteristics and limitations of 121.5/243 and 406 EPIRBs.

1,2,6,7

1

Written and oral assessments will be used to assess students’ competence in:

  • explaining the basic operational characteristics and limitations of 121.5/243 and 406 EPIRBs;
  • detailing detection and location procedures including model specific limitations;
  • describing the COSPAS/SARSAT satellite global detection system;
  • detailing identification and registration procedures for 406 EPIRBs;
  • specifying the actions that must be taken after an accidental activation of an EPIRB; and
  • stating prohibition of on-air testing.
    • Detail detection and location procedures including model specific limitations.

7.3 Describe the Search and Rescue Satellite (COSPAS/SARSAT) global detection system.
Note:  COSPAS is the Russian version of SARSAT.

7.4 Detail identification and registration procedures for 406 EPIRBs.

    •  Specify action to be taken when an EPIRB is accidentally activated.

7.6 State prohibition of on-air testing.

CSLO (General) 8: Describe correct techniques in conducting public correspondence communications.

Student Learning Outcome (specific)

ISLO

PSLO

Assessment Strategies

8.1 State communications services provided by shore stations.

1,2,6,7

1

Written and oral assessments will be used to assess students’ competence in:

  • stating types of services provided by shore stations;
  • detailing procedures for sending and receiving radio telegram messages; and
  • detailing procedures for making and receiving radiotelephone calls.

8.2 Detail procedures for sending and receiving radio telegram messages.

8.3 Detail procedures for making and receiving radiotelephone calls.

CSLO (General) 9: Demonstrate the ability to use digital selective calling (DSC) operating procedures, particularly those relating to distress, urgency and safety.

Student Learning Outcome (specific)

ISLO

PSLO

Assessment Strategies

9.1 Outline the concept of digital selective calling.

 

1,2,6,7

1

Written, oral, and practical assessments will be used to assess students’ competence in:

  • outlining the concept of digital selective calling;
  • describing and demonstrating the method used for identification of stations using digital selective calling;
  • listing the three items of information that would always be contained in DSC alert;
  • listing the frequencies allocated for MF/HF and VHF marine bands for DSC distress, urgency and safety alerts;
  •  listing the MF/HF and VHF radiotelephony frequencies associated with DSC alert frequencies for distress, urgency and safety alerts;
  • describing watch-keeping arrangements on DSC distress, urgency and safety frequencies;
  • describing DSC call formats;
  • describing and demonstrating DSC distress alert procedures;
  • describing and demonstrating the procedure for acknowledgement of receipt of a DSC distress alert on 2187.5 or VHF channel 70;
  • describing and demonstrating the procedure for transmission of a DSC distress alert relay; and
  • describing and demonstrating the procedure for cancellation of an inadvertent DSC distress alert.

Practical assessment checklists will be used to assess students’ competence during demonstration.

    • Describe and demonstrate the method used for identification of stations using digital selective calling.

9.3 List the information contained in a DSC alert

    • List the frequencies allocated for MF/HF and VHF marine bands for DSC distress, urgency and safety alerts
    • List the MF/HF and VHF radiotelephony frequencies associated with DSC alert frequencies for distress, urgency and safety alerts.
    • Describe watch-keeping arrangements on DSC distress, urgency and safety frequencies
    • Describe DSC call formats
    • Describe and demonstrate DSC distress alert procedures.
    • Describe and demonstrate the procedure for acknowledgement of receipt of a DSC distress alert on 2187.5 or VHF channel 70.
    • Describe and demonstrate the procedure for transmission of a DSC distress alert relay.
    • Describe and demonstrate the procedure for cancellation of an inadvertent DSC distress alert.

COURSE CONTENT:

  • Marine Radio Communication Equipment
  • General Regulations
  • Routine Operating Procedures
  • Distress and Alarm Signals
  • Urgency
  • Safety
  • Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons
  • Public Correspondence
  • DSC Operation

METHOD(S) OF INSTRUCTION:

  
[ X ] Lecture                             [X   ] Cooperative learning groups
[ X ] Laboratory                        [ X  ] In-class exercises
[ X ] Audio visual                     [  X ] Demonstrations
[  ] Other

REQUIRED TEXT(S) AND COURSE MATERIALS:

Boyle, Tony. (April 1998). SPC 024 Radiotelephony. Australia: Australian Maritime College.

REFERENCE MATERIALS:

Marine Radio Operators Handbook (April 2000) Australian Communication Authority, Admiralty List of Radio Signals (Jan. 2001)(GMDSS) Vol. 5 United Kingdom Hydrographic Office
GMDSS Radio Personal Training Manual (Sept. 1999) Furuno Electric Co., Ltd. Japan
The Summary of GMDSS (Nov. 2000) Japan Radio Co., Ltd, Japan.


INSTRUCTIONAL COSTS:

 None

EVALUATION:

A grade of at least 70% or a “C” must be achieved to progress to the next level.  All demonstrations should achieve at least a rate of 80%.

CREDIT BY EXAMINATION:

None

 

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