Marine Science Narratives

Courses

Narratives

MR120 Marine Biology/w lab

MR120 meets PLO1 at I and D levels because the course extensively covers the classification of the living forms which is a major component within the marine realm (biological oceanography). Furthermore, to understand the biology of the various taxonomic groups, students must be introduced to the physical and chemical environment in which marine organisms are part of.
MR120 meets PLO2 at the I level because relative to the respective taxonomic groups covered, the students are introduced to the importance of these living forms in terms of ecological benefits and drawbacks, and related human impacts if known.
MR120 meets PLO3 at the I and D levels mainly through the reports produced during the laboratory sessions.
MR120 meets PLO4 at the I and D levels because throughout the course the students must use the specific acquired vocabulary to communicate in various ways such as during class discussions, or questions formulation in class, or when writing their exams or during home assignments, or when preparing laboratory reports. In fact, there are a variety of ways in which the students use the language and concepts of marine biology to communicate.

MR240 Oceanography/w lab

MR240 meets PLO1 at I, D an M levels because it is the objective of the course to cover the major components composing the ocean of the world, namely the geological processes and its geomorphological features, the chemistry of the marine water, the physical aspects of the ocean, and finally the living forms composing the marine realm.
MR240 meets PLO2 at the I level because once the students acquire knowledge relative to the ocean processes, they become better tooled to critically analyze and propose mitigating solutions if needed to a given oceanic issue.
MR240 meets PLO3 at the D level mainly through an exhaustive laboratory report which covers the water mixing processes in an estuary.
MR240 meets PLO4 at the D levels because throughout the course the students must use the specific acquired vocabulary to communicate in various ways such as during class discussions, or questions formulation in class, or when writing their exams or during home assignments, or when preparing laboratory reports. In fact, there are a variety of ways in which the students use the language and concepts learned in oceanography to communicate.

MR210 Marine Ecology

MR210 meets PLO1 at I, D and M levels because the major objective of the course is to understand how both the abiotic (physical, chemical, geological) and biological (living) interact to govern the respective ecosystem composing the marine realm.
MR210 meets PLO2 at the D level because students learn how ecosystems function, with its ecological benefits and drawbacks, and how humans impacts them.
MR210 meets PLO3 at the D level since students are asked to furnish examples of scientific methods used to pinpoint which abiotic or biotic factor can become a limiting factor within a given ecosystem. This as extensively been demonstrated more particularly in the rocky shore substrates of the intertidal zones.
MR210 meets PLO at the D level because throughout the course the students must use the specific acquired vocabulary to communicate either in written or oral format the knowledge acquired in the course. Communication is applied during class discussions, questions formulation in class, when writing their exams, or during home assignments. In fact, there are a variety of ways in which the students use the language and concepts of marine ecology to communicate.

MR250 Fisheries Biology & Management

MR250 meets PLO1 at I and D levels because students need to understand well the physical, chemical, and biological processes of the world oceans to better grasp the notion of primary productivity and how it’s directly linked with the world fisheries. The major world fisheries are concentrated in the areas of the oceans of the world where the primary productivity will be the highest.
MR250 meets PLO2 at the I, D, and M levels because both coastal (reef) and oceanic (tuna) fisheries are the major economic drivers for the tropical pacific island nations. Studying how fisheries are managed is essential to better understand why such resources are often exploited to their maximum sustainable yield or even overexploited and often on the brinks of collapsing. The students are also asked to suggest long term solutions to such predicaments.
MR250 meets PLO3 at the I and D levels since students are asked to use the scientific methodology to draw conclusions relative to fishing management issues. In this course, it is often through assignments linked to bio-statistical problems.
MR250 meets PLO at the D level because throughout the course the students must use the specific acquired vocabulary to communicate either in written or oral format the knowledge acquired in the course. Communication is applied during class discussions, questions formulation in class, when writing their exams, or during home assignments. In fact, there are a variety of ways in which the students use the language and concepts acquired in fisheries biology and management to communicate.

MR 254 Marine Biology Field Study

MR 254 both Demonstrates and shows Mastery of PLO1 in biological oceanography as students are required to demonstrate what they have learned though their coursework into practical application of important biological concepts. The application of this knowledge is demonstrated though the reports and presentations generated by the coursework required by this class.
Students in MR 254 are expected to both Demonstrate and show Mastery of PLO2 through the completion of at least one of the required projects which sees the students selecting a marine environmental topic of some local, regional, or global significance, researching that topic to better understand the issues, and putting together a multimedia summary of the project including possible suggestions/solutions to the problem.
MR 254 both Demonstrates and shows Mastery of PLO3 as the students are expected to apply scientific methodology to at least one (usually 2) research projects of their own manipulation. The field projects themselves are completed by the class, however, the individual students are required to record their data, analyze their data, and reach conclusions on their own.
Students in MR 254 are expected to both Demonstrate and show Mastery of PLO4 requiring effective communication. This outcome is met by all 4 or 5 projects required of this class which all measure this effective scientific communication in the rubrics used to score the submitted projects.

MR 230 Ichthyology

Students in MR 230 are expected to exhibit a biological understanding of the biology of fishes at both the D and M levels as required by the content of this class…specifically, biological oceanography aspects dealing with the taxonomy, biology, and ecology of fishes.
Ichthyology students learn about and are expect to critically analyze the status of local and global fish stocks, demonstrating knowledge and understanding of critical environmental issues that pertain to this field.
MR 230 meets PLO's 3 and 4 at the D and M levels as students are required to read, interpret, and draw conclusions from scientific literature related to the field of Ichthyology, demonstrating understanding of scientific methodology. Additionally, students, in the form of group projects must use the science method protocols to conduct, analyze, and interpret their own research projects.

MR 201 Aquaculture

MR 201 satisfies PLO 1 at the Introduced and Demonstrates levels as the students learn about the physical, chemical, and biological requirements of organisms suitable for husbandry. Demonstration of this knowledge comes from the monitoring of biological and chemical parameters within aquaculture systems and requires adjustments be made to best optimize the growing conditions for the cultured species.
MR 201 meets PLO 2 at all 3 levels as students are introduced to issues relating to local, regional, and global food security. Students are able to demonstrate their understanding of these issues by completing essay questions relating to these very issues, and students then exhibit mastery of these issues by generating hypothetical aquaculture project business plans that respond to some local, regional, or global food security demand.
Under critical reflection, I would now argue that MR 201 at best may introduce a few new formulas and experiments as required by PLO 3 but may not satisfy this at the Demonstrate level. I would recommend the D be removed from the matrix at this slot as it is not a strong fit for the course at this current time.
Aquaculture students Demonstrate effective scientific communication though the various test questions they are expected to answer relating to aquaculture concepts (written) and through oral presentations that are the capstone projects to this class.

SC230

Sc230 meets PLOs 3 and 4 because throughout the course the students must complete lab reports, carry out experiment using the scientific process and PLO3. Furthermore they submit research papers, lab reports, complete presentations, homework assignments etc.. ensuring they communicate effectively by a variety of means and techniques.

MS150

MS 150 Statistics students learn to analyze data using standard statistical techniques including calculating basic statistics, finding correlations, constructing confidence intervals, testing hypotheses, and determining whether sample means differ between two samples, thus providing a basis on which valid scientific conclusions can be drawn.

This website and all COM-FSM Internet based services are best viewed with Firefox 3.0 or better.
© Copyright 2014 College of Micronesia-FSM | Site Disclaimer
P. O. Box 159, Kolonia, Pohnpei, 96941 - (691) 320-2480
College of Micronesia-FSM is accredited by the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges,
Western Association of Schools and Colleges, 10 Commercial Bldv., Suite 204, Novato, CA 94949, (415) 506-0234,
an institutional accrediting body recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation and the U.S. Department of Education.
Additional information about accreditation, including the filing of complaints against member institutions, can be found at: www.accjc.org

feedback