Liberal Arts

  • PSLO
  • Data Sheet
  • Program Review
  • Assessment Report

Program Student Learning Outcomes Assessment
(AY 2013-2014)

Program Student Learning Outcomes(PSLOs)

At the completion of Liberal Arts Program, the student will be able to:

  1. Enrich and deepen self-knowledge by exploring different academic experiences.
  2. Articulate and understand their experiences through effective writing, reading, speaking and various modes of artistic expression.
  3. Demonstrate fundamental knowledge and basic skills appropriate to their personal and professional goals in their chosen area of specialization.

PSLO Assessment Report Summary

What we looked at:

The Liberal Arts Program assessment focused on PSLO 2, more specifically the writing aspect of the PSLO. Listed below are the results for the PSLO assessment.

What we found:

  • Only 13% of the students in the EN 201 class could demonstrate coherent writing and appropriate use of writing conventions.
  • In the EN/CO 205 class, less than 25% of the students (4 out of 17) could articulate in writing the content of the course in the required format for the writing assignment.
  • In the EN 208 and EN 209 classes, because new and unfamiliar concepts and theories were introduced to the students, only 37-40% of the total number of students assessed (15-16 students out of 40) demonstrated knowledge of content and format in their writing.

These were the areas of weakness that were apparent from the writing samples provided by the students.

What we are planning to work on:

  • For the 2014-2015 SY, the students in the Foreign Language (FL) courses will be assessed on their performance and speaking ability in the foreign language that they studied. Students will need to demonstrate the ability to carry out a simple conversation with a native speaker of the language that they study. These assessment activities will assess PSLO 1 and 2 of the Liberal Arts program with a specific focus on speaking abilities.
  • 100% of all students who are taking the FL 101: Japanese I, FL102: Japanese II, FL103: Chinese I and FL 104: Chinese II courses will be assessed. Since these classes are electives for the Liberal Arts students, the students in these classes will need to demonstrate a 70% or better accuracy in speaking in specific situations in the respective languages.
  • The rubric for assessing their speech will be developed by the FL faculty for use during the next assessment cycle.
  • The division will gradually incorporate pre-requisites for these courses (EN 110, EN120a and EN 120b) so that students are gaining the requisite skills needed for success in other required courses.
  • Work with our advisees to ensure effective planning (take what is needed first to build skills before taking upper level courses) and timely completion.
  • Analyze Liberal Arts students’ IDPs to see how many have taken EN120a? How many had to repeat this class? How well did he/she do in EN 120a? Has this student taken EN120b? How many times?
  • This analysis will provide the data needed to show whether past performance in EN120a/EN110 is an indicator of future performance in EN120b and other upper level classes. We need to determine where students are having difficulty in order to determine ways to help them.

Recommendations for students:

  • Read regularly: To help aid in coherence, comprehension and to expand background knowledge on content, students need to make reading a regular part of their everyday practice. Reading will help them more in their English courses and in any other courses in college since this will help to expand vocabulary and increase understanding of usage and will build knowledge of different subjects. To be successful in the Liberal Arts program, students need to read often and read regularly. Students should make it a habit to read ahead in their textbooks rather than relying on their instructors to provide all the information they need.
  • Writing and Reflection: To become better at writing, students do need to practice writing. Putting thoughts into writing, reading what they write and reflecting on their writing is good practice. Writing about their reading can also help to aid understanding of unfamiliar subjects. For students to be proficient in writing, they must write.
  • Assessment done in these classes involves a writing component so it is recommended that students successfully complete EN 120a and EN120b prior to enrolling in upper level classes. Identifying their weaknesses in writing, getting help from qualified tutors and making writing a skill that they practice often can help students improve.
  • Students need to already start thinking and learning about their future careers so that when they enter into the Liberal Arts program, they will be informed about what types of skills and knowledge they will need for their future careers. Being aware of this will help students better plan their education and their career paths and will allow them to make good decisions when selecting classes and electives in the major.

Program Data Sheet
Spring 2014

Download PDF Version of the Data Sheet

Enrollment by Major and Campus

Major:

Degree

Term

Chuuk

Kosrae

National

Pohnpei

Yap

Students

Liberal Arts

AA

Fall 2011

 

74

191

73

43

381

Liberal Arts

AA

Fall 2012

 

56

190

43

32

321

Liberal Arts

AA

Fall 2013

1

37

170

36

23

267

Liberal Arts

AA

Spring 2011

 

31

179

48

29

287

Liberal Arts

AA

Spring 2012

 

63

163

48

42

316

Liberal Arts

AA

Spring 2013

2

43

151

27

26

249

Liberal Arts

AA

Spring 2014

1

23

161

30

25

240



Credits by Major and Campus

Major:

Degree

Term

Chuuk

Kosrae

National

Pohnpei

Yap

Credits

Liberal Arts

AA

Fall 2011

 

885

2422

787.5

569

4663.5

Liberal Arts

AA

Fall 2012

 

593

2316

543

336

3788

Liberal Arts

AA

Fall 2013

11

352

2040

425

262

3090

Liberal Arts

AA

Spring 2011

 

366

2254

640

385

3645

Liberal Arts

AA

Spring 2012

 

642

2056

535.5

512

3745.5

Liberal Arts

AA

Spring 2013

17

360

1868

280

276

2801

Liberal Arts

AA

Spring 2014

3

225

1883

309

306

2726



Credits by Program and Campus

Program

Term

Chuuk

Kosrae

National

Pohnpei

Yap

Credits

Liberal Arts (AA)

Fall 2011

432

225

999

51

57

1764

Liberal Arts (AA)

Fall 2012

372

162

840

27

102

1503

Liberal Arts (AA)

Fall 2013

372

132

786

24

156

1470

Liberal Arts (AA)

Spring 2011

381

246

1065

30

75

1797

Liberal Arts (AA)

Spring 2012

513

240

1050

57

276

2136

Liberal Arts(AA)

Spring 2013

474

219

798

33

132

1656

Liberal Arts(AA)

Spring 2014

237

153

791

 

147

1329



Credits Enrolled, Attempted and Earned(averages)

Major

Degree

Term

CredEnrollAvg

CredAttAvg

CredEarnAvg

TermGPAAvg

Liberal Arts

AA

Fall 2011

12.2

10.2

8.4

2.18

Liberal Arts

AA

Fall 2012

11.8

10.2

8.4

2.13

Liberal Arts

AA

Fall 2013

11.6

9.9

8.3

2.18

Liberal Arts

AA

Spring 2011

12.7

10.9

9.0

2.16

Liberal Arts

AA

Spring 2012

11.9

9.9

8.0

1.99

Liberal Arts

AA

Spring 2013

11.2

9.4

7.3

2.00

Liberal Arts

AA

Spring 2014

11.4

9.7

8.2

2.02



Program Sections, Enrollment Ratio and Average Class Size

Program

Term

Section

EnrollMax

Enrollment

EnrollRatio

AvgClassSize

Liberal Arts (AA)

Fall 2011

24

602

551

91.5%

23.0

Liberal Arts (AA)

Fall 2012

23

581

467

80.4%

20.30

Liberal Arts (AA)

Fall 2013

24

601

443

73.7%

18.5

Liberal Arts (AA)

Spring 2011

25

643

555

86.3%

22.2

Liberal Arts (AA)

Spring 2012

30

765

645

84.3%

21.5

Liberal Arts (AA)

Spring 2013

26

619

458

74.0%

17.6

Liberal Arts (AA)

Spring 2014

23

546

443

81.1%

19.3



Persistence and Retention (new full time students)

Major Description

Degree

New Students FT 2011_3

Students 2012_1

Students 2012_3

Persistence Spring 2012

Retention Fall 2012

Liberal Arts

AA

73

60

35

82.2%

47.9%


Major

Degree

New FT Fall 2012

Persisted Spring 2013

Retained Fall 2013

Persistence Spring 2013

Retention Fall 2013

Liberal Arts

AA

62

49

32

79.0%

51.6%

Major

Degree

New FT Fall 2013

Persisted Spring 2014

Retained Fall 2014

Persistence Spring 2013

Retention Fall 2014

Liberal Arts

AA

36

31

 

86.1%

0.0%



Course Completion & Withdrawals (Major)

Major

Degree

Term

Students

ABCorP%

ABCDorP%

W%

Liberal Arts

AA

Fall 2011

1244

64.1%

74.0%

7.9%

Liberal Arts

AA

Fall 2012

1484

62.8%

72.4%

7.5%

Liberal Arts

AA

Fall 2013

1017

62.2%

73.3%

10.9%

Liberal Arts

AA

Spring 2011

1187

66.0%

74.9%

9.7%

Liberal Arts

AA

Spring 2012

1231

61.1%

72.2%

11.6%

Liberal Arts

AA

Spring 2013

964

58.7%

67.1%

15.1%

Liberal Arts

AA

Spring 2014

908

61.2%

72.8%

13.3%



Course Completion & Withdrawals (Program)

Program

Term

Students

ABCorP%

ABCDorP%

W%

Liberal Arts (AA)

Fall 2011

588

66.7%

80.60%

6.3%

Liberal Arts (AA)

Fall 2012

501

65.9%

78.2%

6.8%

Liberal Arts (AA)

Fall 2013

490

68.0%

79.4%

8.8%

Liberal Arts (AA)

Spring 2011

599

67.9%

80.0%

7.2%

Liberal Arts (AA)

Spring 2012

701

67.0%

78.2%

9.3%

Liberal Arts (AA)

Spring 2013

551

61.2%

70.2%

17.1%

Liberal Arts (AA)

Spring 2014

443

70.4%

80.1%

7.4%



Graduates

Major

Degree

AY2010/11

AY2011/12

AY2012/13

AY2013/14

Liberal Arts

AA

67

46

61



Graduate Rates

Major

Degree

Cohort

New Full Students

Graduation Rate 100%

Graduation Rate 150%

Graduation Rate 200%

Liberal Arts

AA

Fall 2008 FT

24

0.0%

41.7%

100.0%

Liberal Arts

AA

Fall 2009 FT

36

2.8%

27.8%

41.7%

Liberal Arts

AA

Fall 2010 FT

77

1.3%

14.3%

 

Liberal Arts

AA

Fall 2011 FT

36

  • Data based on SIS extracts December 2013 expect for graduates information.
  • Program" information is based on Dickerson's concept of a "program" as expending resoruces and is linked to courses owned by a program from TracDat
  • Graduation rates are based on Fall new students(full time) cohorts that are tracked at 100%, 150%, and 200%
  • Retention rates are based on Fall new students (full time) cohorts who return the following fall semester
  • Persistence rates are based on Fall new students (full time) cohorts who return the following spring semester

Program Review (National Campus)

AP Full Official: Liberal Arts

Campus: National Campus

Completed by: Resida S. Keller, Language & Literature Division Chairperson

AP Review Submission Date: April 4, 2014

AR Review Cycle: AY 2012-2013

  1. Program Goals

    Program goals are broad statements concerning knowledge, skills, or values that the faculty members expect the graduating students to achieve.

    Upon successful completion of this degree program, students will be able to:

    Provide basic knowledge of human biological sciences in preparation for a career in health.

    1. Enrich and deepen self-knowledge by exploring different academic experiences.
    2. Articulate and understand their experiences through effective writing, reading, speaking, and various modes of artistic expression.
    3. Demonstrate fundamental knowledge and basic skills appropriate to their personal and professional goals in their chosen area of specialization.

  2. Program History

    This section describes the history of the program. This includes the date and reason of implementation, significant milestones in the development of the program, and significant current activities.

    The Associate of Arts degree program in Liberal Arts was established in 1975 to enable students to transfer to a four-year college, university, or other institution. Other than the addition and establishment of more focused and area-specific liberal arts degrees such as the Liberal Arts/Media studies and the Liberal Arts/Education programs (adopted in 1997) or the Liberal Arts/HCOP [Health Careers Opportunities Program], there have been no major changes to the structure of the Liberal Arts program in the past 10 years. The program learning outcomes (above) for the L.A. Degree program were adopted in Spring 2005.

  3. Program Descriptions

    The program description describes the program, including its organization, relationship to other programs in the system, program design, degree(s) offered, and other significant features of the program, such as elements/resources for forward-looking new program contributions to the state’s economy, or specialized program accreditation.

    1. Organization: The Liberal Arts program is currently organized with the Chairperson of the Languages and Literature division being the responsible person for collection of SLO information from faculty and program implementation. All academic divisions at the National campus contribute to the Liberal Arts program. Students completing this program receive an Associate of Arts degree and which often leads to transferring to other institutions of higher education within the region and the United States for more specialized study.
    2. Relationship to other programs in the system: The liberal Arts program is one of the two-year academic majors offered at the National campus of COM-FSM. Many of the courses in the Liberal Arts program are either major course requirements for other programs or it shares courses with other majors. For example, as part of the program requirements, students are required to take courses in the natural sciences, social sciences, health sciences, humanities and language arts.
  4. Program Admission Requirements

    This section describes the requirements for admission into the program and other requisites.

    All students accepted for admission into the college are eligible to enter/major in the Liberal Arts program. Currently, students undecided on a major are also listed as Liberal Arts majors until they decide otherwise. The college’s admissions criteria as listed in the college website at http://www.comfsm.fm/publications/catalog-2013- 2014/requirements.pdf. is followed when admitting students into this program.

  5. Program Certificate/Degree Requirements

    This section specifies the requirements for obtaining a certificate/degree in the program, including specific courses,, sequencing of courses, total credits, internships, practical, etc.

    The Liberal Arts program as it currently stands consists of General Education Core Requirements in English [9 credits], Natural Sciences [7 credits], Mathematics, Social Sciences, Computer Applications and Humanities [each 3 credits], and Exercise Sports Science [1 credit].

    In addition to General Education core requirements, there are the Major Requirements which include the following courses: three credits for each of these courses---Speech Communication (EN/CO 205), Health Science (SC 101), Introduction to Sociology (SS 130), General Psychology (SS/PY 101); three credits each of a 200- levelEnglish course and Humanities elective, six credits of any classes from either the Natural Science or Social Science group of courses and nine credits of open electives, totaling up to sixty-two credits (62) required for an Associate’s degree.

    Currently students are encouraged to follow a specified sequence of courses so that they are able to complete the program within two years.
    Here is the suggested sequence of Liberal Arts courses as it currently stands in the college catalog:

    First Semester

    • EN 110 Advance Reading...............................3
    • EN 120a Expository Writing I.........................3
    • CA 100 Computer Literacy.............................3
    • MS 100 College Algebra...............................3
    • SS 150 History of Micronesia.........................3
    • 15 total credits

    Second Semester

    • EN 120b Expository Writing II........................3
    • EN/CO 205 Speech Communication..............3
    • SS/PY 101 General Psychology..................3
    • Humanities Elective....................................3
    • Science with Lab.......................................4
    • 16 total credits

    Third Semester

    • SC 101 Health Science...................................3
    • SS 130 Intro to Sociology...............................3
    • Non-Lab Science or Agriculture......................3
    • English Elective..............................................3
    • Specialty......................................................3
    • Exercies Sports Science course.....................1
    • 16 total credits

    Fourth Semester

    • Specialty...............................................3
    • Humanities Elective..............................3
    • Open Electives.....................................3
    • Open Elective......................................3
    • Open Elective......................................3
    • 16 total credits

    Source: General Catalog 2013-2014 pg. 23

    http://www.comfsm.fm/publications/catalog-2013-2014/requirements.pdf

    As is apparent in the list of courses required for the program, students in the program are not required to complete any internships, field experiences, practicums or licensing as this is a program that encourages exploration into a general course of study to help students transfer to other institutions or to further learn about different fields of study.

  6. Program Courses and Enrollment

    This section lists courses offered in the program, including number of sections, course enrollment, section fill rates, and redundancy of courses across the institution.

    LIBERAL ARTS COURSE OFFERINGS (MAJOR COURSE REQUIREMENTS)
    (SPRING 2012-FALL 2012)

    COURSE NAME

    Total Enrollment

    # of Sections

    Class Size/Course

     

    Program Course Requirements

    SP 12

    Fall 2012

    Sp 12

    Fall 12

    Sp 12

    Fall 12

    EN/CO 205 Speec Comm.

    198

    123

    10

    6

    20

    19

    SC 101 Health Science

    180

    176

    9

    8

    20

    19

    SS 130 Intro. to Sociology

    91

    73

    4

    3

    20

    19

    SS/PY General Psychology

    168

    107

    8

    5

    20

    19

     

    200-Level English Elective

    EN 201 Intro to Literature

    108

    83

    5

    4

    20

    19

    EN 203 Drama

    0

    0

    0

    0

    20

    19

    EN 204 Poetry

    0

    0

    0

    0

    20

    19

    EN 208 Intro to Philosophy

    116

    95

    5

    4

    20

    19

    EN 209 Intro to Religion

    20

    20

    1

    1

    20

    19

     

    Humanities Elective

    AR 101 Intro to Art

    87

    51

    4

    2

    20

    19

    MU 101 Intro to Music

    80

    0

    4

    0

    20

    19

    SS 170 History I

    52

    88

    2

    4

    20

    19

    SS 171 History II

    52

    28

    2

    1

    20

    19

    EN 201 Intro to Literature

    108

    83

    5

    4

    20

    19

    EN 208 Intro to Philosophy

    116

    95

    5

    4

    20

    19

    FL 101 Japanese I

    104

    92

    5

    5

    20

    19

    FL 102 Japanese II

    14

    0

    1

    0

    20

    19

    FL 103 Chinese I

    41

    60

    2

    3

    20

    19

    FL 104 Chinese II

    0

    0

    0

    0

    20

    19

  7. Program Faculty

    This section reports the faculty of the program, including full-time and part-time faculty. The degrees held and rank are provided for the full-time and part-time faculty. Finally, provide the faculty student ratio for the program.

    The program faculty consists of faculty members from the different academic divisions of the college. The Liberal Arts program is taught by a unique mix of the college’s existing faculty members as the program requirements consist of courses that come from many of the different divisions of the college. The Languages and Literature Division faculty, for the most part, act as advisors and teachers to the students who choose Liberal Arts as their major.
    Here is a list of the current faculty members of the Liberal Arts program:

    1. Biza, Leilani(Languange and Literature
      1. B.A University of Guam
      2. M.A. University of Guam
    2. Gonzales, Jazmin: (Math/Science;HCOP Coordinator)
      1. B.S. Central Philippines University;
      2. M.A. University of the Philippines
    3. Haglelgam, John: (Social Science)
      1. B.A. University of Hawaii
      2. M.A. University of Hawaii
      3. M.P.A. Harvard University
    4. Kamikubo, Akiko: (Languages and Literature)
      1. B.A. Tokyo University of Foreign Studies
      2. M.A. Tokyo University of Foreign Studies
    5. Keller, Resida: (Languages and Literature)
      1. B.A. Brigham Young University-Hawaii
      2. M.Ed. San Diego State University
    6. Paul, Kasiano: (Languages and Literature)
      1. M.A. Saint Patrick Seminar and University
    7. Rivera, Monica: (Languages and Literature)
      1. B.A. University of California
      2. M.A. University of Wyoming
    8. Manuel-Ehmes, Delihna: (Social Science)
      1. Manuel-Ehmes, Delihna: (Social Science)
      2. Certificate in Clinical Psychology University of Hawaii-Manoa
      3. B.S. Missouri Southern State College
      4. M.S. Capella University
    9. Sam, Lucy Donre: (Social Science)
      1. B.A. University of Hawaii at Hilo
      2. M.A. San Diego State University
    10. Ulm, Amy Delyla: (Languages and Literature)
      1. B.A. Beloit College
      2. TEFL Certificate, Harvard University’s WorldTeach
      3. M.A. Arizona State University
    11. Massicupp, Vincent David: (Languages and Literature)
      1. B.A. St. Mary’s College of Maryland
      2. M.A. St. Mary’s College of Maryland
    12. Vierra, Monty: (Languages and Literature)
      1. B.A., Thomas Edison State College
      2. M.A., California State University
      3. Ed. D. Idaho State University
    13. Xioana, Cheng
  8. Program Indicators

    This section provides the data for analyzing the extent to which the program has achieved the established outcomes and criteria. This is the most important part of the program review. The data that will be collected and evaluated are the following:

    A. Assessment of Course Student Learning outcomes of program courses

    Spring 2012
    Course Instructor A B C D F Withdrawal recommendations/Comments
    EN 208 Philosophy Christopher Ross Perkins 4 9 6 6 10 4 4 of the 5 "F" were due to violating the attendance policy in the class, hence the importance of attendance to passing the class.
    EN 209 Religion Christopher Ross Perkins 3 2 3 3 6 3 none
    EN 201 Literature Monica Rivera 12 6 2 1 1 0 Students cooperated well in group assignments for the short story discussions and the drama assignments.
    EN 204 Poetry John Ranahan 1 8 5 1 1 0 None
    EN/CO 205 Amy Delyla Ulm 9 11 12 5 4 0 Passing EN 120 A with a grade of C or higher should be a required prerequisite for this course.
    Fall 2012
    Course Instructor A B C D F Withdrawal recommendations/Comments
    EN 208 Philosophy Christopher Ross Perkins 2 6 6 2 4 1 all "F" were due to attendance; there was a 46% difference in the averages from the pre to the post test (pre-test averages: 15%; post-test average: 61%
    EN 209 Religion Christopher Ross Perkins 2 2 5 7 1 2  
    EN 201 Literature John Ranahan 4 9 16 10 3 0 The majority of students struggled with the basic elements of the literary genres
    EN 204 Poetry Not offered              
    EN/CO 205 Amy Delyla Ulm 6 10 4 0 2   * Class was taken over mid-semester when initial instructor left--students had to pick up with new instructor where they left off. Most assessments was based on this latter instructor's evaluations.
    FL 101 Akiko Kamikubo 1 9 1 2 2 0 Hiragana workbook was useful in helping students with reading and writing. The workbook should be checked more frequently and strictly especially for slow- learners.
    Spring 2013
    Course Instructor A B C D F Withdrawal recommendations/Comments
    EN 208 Philosophy Christopher Ross Perkins              
    EN 209 Religion                
    EN 201 Literature               *working to fix electronic copies that were submitted-file got corrupted so data will be available at a later date.
    EN 204 Poetry                
    EN/CO 205                
    FL 101 Japanese I                
    Spring 2013
    Course Instructor A B C D F Withdrawal recommendations/Comments
    EN 208 Philosophy Kasiano Paul 16 13 12 0 3 1 Presentations and class discussions were methods that worked well with the students.
    EN 209 Religion Kasiano Paul 4 3 10 1 1 1 Students demonstrated unfamiliarity with the major religions discussed in class, thus hindering understanding of course content.
    EN 201 Literature Monica Rivera 9 6 7 1 2 0 By mid-term, most students who were passing (A,b and C--52%) either maintained their performance or improved showing a 48% of the students earning an 'A' in the class.
    EN 204 Poetry                
    EN/CO 205 Christina Madison 1 2 8 1 0 0 Passing EN 120a with a C or higher should be a pre-requisite for this class.
    FL 101 Japanese I Akiko Kamikubo 8 10 4 1 1 0 Hiragana workbook was not bound well and had missing pages--note to inform the bookstore as this book is essential for student practice.
    ART 101 Christina Madison 5 5 2 1 0 7 Due to cultural and historical contexts, the reading in the text was difficult for students to connect to; because most students taking this class were freshmen, many dropped out due to the intensive reading and homework which they were not used to coming straight from high school.

    All assessments of courses offered under the Liberal Arts program for the Fall/Spring 2012 and Fall/Spring 2013 semesters can be found at the following link:
    http://wiki.comfsm.fm/Programs/Liberal_Arts


    B. Assessment of Program Student Learning Outcomes

    For the 2012-2013 assessment of the Liberal Arts program learning outcomes, the PSLO #2 which states “Articulate and understand their experiences through effective writing, reading, speaking, and various modes of artistic expression” was the outcome that the division focused on during this assessment cycle.

    The Liberal Arts Program assessment focused on PSLO 2. Listed below are the results for the PSLO 2.

    What we found:
    Multiple sections (8 sections total) of the four courses assessed were EN 201 [Intro. To Literature], EN 205 [Speech Communication], EN 208 [Intro. To Religion] and EN 209 [Intro. To Philosophy]. A sample of 120 students was assessed using a modified COMET rubric that assessed students in four areas (coherence, content, format and conventions). 86% of the students in all the 200-level English courses assessed performed above average for Coherence (4 out of 4 courses performed above the set satisfactory rate of 70% which is the minimum for passing). Students in 3 out of the 4 courses performed above average on content (50%, 73%, 78% and 86%). Students in 3 out of 4 courses performed above average on Format (64%, 74%, 81%, and 86%). Students in 2 out of 3 courses performed above average on Conventions (64%, 84%, and 95%). The students in the fourth course (Speech Communication) were not assessed on the conventions criteria.
    More information on the Liberal Arts program Assessment plans, activities and results can be retrieved and reviewed at the following link: http://www.comfsm.fm/?q=Liberal-Arts-Program


    C. Program enrollment (historical enrollment patterns, student credits by major)

    LIBERAL ARTS PROGRAM ENROLLMENT DATA

    (SPRING 2012-FALL 2013)

    Spring 2012 Enrollment by Major and Campus

    Major Description

    Degree

    Chuuk

    Kosrae

    National

    Pohnpei

    Yap

    Students

    Liberal Arts

    AA

     

    63

    165

    48

    42

    318


    Fall 2012 Enrollment by Degree and Major

    Major Description

    Degree

    Chuuk

    Kosrae

    National

    Pohnpei

    Yap

    College

    %

    Liberal Arts

    AA

     

    59

    188

    44

    33

    324

    11.80%


    Spring 2013 Enrollment by Major, Degree, and Campus

    Major Description

    Degree

    Chuuk

    Kosrae

    National

    Pohnpei

    Yap

    Student

    Liberal Arts

    AA

    2

    42

    152

    28

    25

    249


    Fall 2013 Enrollment by Major Campus

    Major Description

    Degree

    Chuuk

    Kosrae

    National

    Pohnpei

    Yap

    College

    %

    Liberal Arts

    AA

    1

    38

    169

    37

    23

    268

    %


    Enrollment by Major and Campus

    Major Description

    Degree

    Term

    Chuuk

    Kosrae

    National

    Pohnpei

    Yap

    Student

    Liberal Arts

    AA

    Fall 2011

     

    74

    191

    73

    43

    381

    Liberal Arts

    AA

    Fall 2012

     

    56

    190

    43

    32

    321

    Liberal Arts

    AA

    Fall 2013

    1

    37

    170

    36

    23

    267

    Liberal Arts

    AA

    Spring 2011

     

    31

    179

    48

    29

    287

    Liberal Arts

    AA

    Spring 2012

     

    63

    163

    48

    42

    316

    Liberal Arts

    AA

    Spring 2013

    2

    43

    151

    27

    26

    249

    This set of data further confirms the downward decline in enrollment in the major. The enrollment figures show a drastic drop in enrollment at the state campuses between the Fall and the Spring semesters. This drop in enrollment could be due to students transferring to the National campus and changing their majors as many undecided majors are by default, counted as Liberal Arts majors.



    D. Average Class Size

    Program Sections, Enrollment Ratio and Average Class Size

    Program

    Term

    Section

    EnrollMax

    Enrollment

    EnrollRatio

    Average Class Size

    Liberal Arts (AA)

    Fall 2011

    24

    602

    551

    91.5%

    23.0

    Liberal Arts (AA)

    Fall 2012

    23

    581

    467

    80.4%

    20.30

    Liberal Arts (AA)

    Fall 2013

    24

    601

    443

    73.7%

    18.5

    Liberal Arts (AA)

    Spring 2011

    25

    643

    555

    86.3%

    22.2

    Liberal Arts (AA)

    Spring 2012

    30

    765

    645

    84.3%

    21.5

    Liberal Arts (AA)

    Spring 2013

    26

    619

    458

    74.0%

    17.6

    The data shows that there are more sections offered during the Spring semester than the Fall semester, that actual enrollment in courses within the program did not fall below 400+ students during this assessment cycle and that class sizes dropped with Fall and Spring 2011 having the highest class size and Fall and Spring 2013 seeing a drop in class size of about 5 students in the Fall and 1 student in the Spring. Enrollment numbers have dropped since the beginning of the assessment cycle in 2012 and have steadily followed a downward trend or decline since 2011.


    E. Course completion rate

    Subject Description

    Course Number

    Term

    Students

    ABC or P%

    ABCD or P%

    W%

    English

    201

    Fall 2011

    93

    73.10%

    89.20%

    3.20%

    English

    201

    Fall 2012

    83

    67.50%

    86.70%

    6.00%

    English

    201

    Fall 2013

    83

    75.90%

    86.70%

    2.40%

    English

    201

    Spring 2011

    80

    77.50%

    86.30%

    6.30%

    English

    201

    Spring 2012

    108

    74.10%

    86.10%

    7.40%

    English

    201

    Spring 2013

    98

    78.60%

    84.70%

    3.10%

     

    English

    205

    Fall 2013

    25

    40.0%

    52.00%

    8.00%

    English

    205

    Spring 2012

    31

    71.00%

    93.5%

    0.00%

    English

    205

    Spring 2013

    29

    89.7%

    96.6%

    3.40%

     

    English

    208

    Fall 2011

    116

    69.00%

    79.3%

    4.30%

    English

    208

    Fall 2012

    95

    63.2%

    69.5%

    2.1%

    English

    208

    Fall 2013

    81

    84.0%

    87.7%

    6.2%

    English

    208

    Spring 2011

    121

    67.80%

    75.2%

    14.9%

    English

    208

    Spring 2012

    116

    70.7%

    81.9%

    6.0%

    English

    208

    Spring 2013

    97

    61.9%

    67.0%

    20.6%

     

    English

    209

    Fall 2012

    20

    45.0%

    80.0%

    15.0%

    English

    209

    Fall 2013

    21

    81.0%

    90.5%

    4.8%

    English

    209

    Spring 2012

    20

    40.0%

    55.0%

    15.0%

    English

    209

    Spring 2013

    19

    68.4%

    73.7%

    26.3%

     

    Art

    101

    Fall 2011

    62

    90.3%

    96.8%

    1.60%

    Art

    101

    Fall 2012

    51

    76.5%

    78.4%

    3.90%

    Art

    101

    Fall 2013

    66

    57.6%

    75.8%

    13.60%

    Art

    101

    Spring 2012

    87

    69.0%

    74.7%

    16.10%

    Art

    101

    Spring 2013

    141

    61.70%

    68.1%

    14.90%

     

    Foreign Languages

    101

    Fall 2012

    92

    60.9%

    80.70%

    4.50%

    Foreign Languages

    101

    Fall 2013

    67

    79.1%

    75.00%

    14.10%

    Foreign Languages

    101

    Spring 2011

    72

    76.4%

    80.60%

    10.40%

    Foreign Languages

    101

    Spring 2012

    104

    63.5%

    90.30%

    0.00%

    Foreign Languages

    101

    Spring 2013

    76

    71.1%

    75.00%

    11.5%

     

    Foreign Languages

    102

    Fall 2011

    21

    71.4%

    71.4%

    4.80%

    Foreign Languages

    102

    Spring 2011

    21

    71.4%

    76.20%

    4.80%

    Foreign Languages

    102

    Spring 2012

    14

    78.6%

    85.7%

    0.00%

    Foreign Languages

    102

    Spring 2013

    16

    75.00%

    75.00%

    18.80%

     

    Foreign Languages

    103

    Fall 2011

    28

    64.3%

    82.1%

    17.90%

    Foreign Languages

    103

    Fall 2012

    60

    88.3%

    90.00%

    10.00%

    Foreign Languages

    103

    Fall 2013

    68

    69.10%

    86.60%

    11.80%

    Foreign Languages

    103

    Spring 2011

    48

    81.3%

    89.60%

    10.40%

    Foreign Languages

    103

    Spring 2012

    41

    85.4%

    100.00%

    0.00%

    Foreign Languages

    103

    Spring 2013

    44

    86.4%

    93.20%

    6.80%

     

    General Psychology

    101

    Fall 2013

    28

     

    75.00%

    21.40%

    General Psychology

    101

    Fall 2011

    166

    65.10%

    85.50%

    5.40%

    General Psychology

    101

    Fall 2012

    107

    71.00%

    83.20%

    4.70%

    General Psychology

    101

    Fall 2013

    98

    66.30%

    84.70%

    7.10%

    General Psychology

    101

    Spring 2011

    159

    57.2%

    77.40%

    3.10%

    General Psychology

    101

    Spring 2012

    168

    66.7%

    81.5%

    7.10%

    General Psychology

    101

    Spring 2013

    133

    61.7%

    75.20%

    7.50%

     

    Social Science

    130

    Fall 2011

    54

    64.8%

    79.6%

    5.6%

    Social Science

    130

    Fall 2012

    73

    56.2%

    72.6%

    13.7%

    Social Science

    130

    Fall 2013

    59

    49.2%

    66.1%

    25.4%

    Social Science

    130

    Spring 2011

    70

    78.60%

    84.3%

    4.30%

    Social Science

    130

    Spring 2012

    91

    63.7%

    70.30%

    8.80%

    Social Science

    130

    Spring 2013

    66

    48.5%

    62.1%

    22.7%

     

    Social Science

    170

    Fall 2012

    88

    31.8%

    76.5%

    2.5%

    Social Science

    170

    Fall 2013

    98

    93.9%

    54.5%

    2.30%

    Social Science

    170

    Spring 2011

    208

    68.3%

    95.9%

    0.00%

    Social Science

    170

    Spring 2012

    52

    42.3%

    74.00%

    5.8%

    Social Science

    170

    Spring 2013

    42

    71.4%

    53.8%

    11.5%

     

    Social Science

    171

    Fall 2012

    28

    85.7%

    89.3%

    7.10%

    Social Science

    171

    Spring 2012

    52

    63.5%

    75.00%

    9.60%

    Social Science

    171

    Spring 2013

    25

    84.00%

    84.00%

    4.00%

     

    Science

    101

    Fall 2011

    230

    58.30%

    68.70%

    8.30%

    Science

    101

    Fall 2012

    176

    63.10%

    75.00%

    2.30%

    Science

    101

    Fall 2013

    155

    48.4%

    69.00%

    11.60%

    Science

    101

    Spring 2011

    179

    52.50%

    62.00%

    16.20%

    Science

    101

    Spring 2012

    180

    33.30%

    47.20%

    23.90%

    Science

    101

    Spring 2013

    158

    27.80%

    38.6%

    25.90%

     

    Music

    101

    Fall 2011

    84

    66.70%

    70.20%

    17.90%

    Music

    101

    Fall 2013

    41

    90.20%

    92.70%

    7.30%

    Music

    101

    Spring 2011

    129

    61.2%

    65.1%

    17.1%

    Music

    101

    Spring 2012

    80

    63.8%

    65.00%

    21.3%

     

    Speech Communication

    205

    Fall 2011

    159

    63.5%

    71.7%

    10.70%

    Speech Communication

    205

    Fall 2012

    123

    71.50%

    78.00%

    7.30%

    Speech Communication

    205

    Fall 2013

    95

    64.2%

    74.70%

    5.30%

    Speech Communication

    205

    Spring 2011

    169

    69.2%

    81.10%

    7.10%

    Speech Communication

    205

    Spring 2012

    167

    64.7%

    71.3%

    16.20%

    Speech Communication

    205

    Spring 2013

    109

    43.1%

    51.4%

    36.70%

    Completion rates show that overall rates were higher during the spring semesters as compared to the Fall semesters. The lowest passing rate was in the Health Science course with a rate of 27.8% while the Humanities courses boasted the highest passing rates with student passing rates for the foreign languages, history, music and arts classes ranging from the high 70s to 100% passing rates consistently across the board. Social science courses had the next highest passing rates, followed by English classes and the natural science courses.


    F. Student persistence rate (semester to semester)

    Persistence and Retention (new full time students)

    Major

    Degree

    New Stdnts
    FT 2011_3

    Students 2012_1

    Students 2012_3

    Persistence
    Spring 2012

    Retention Fall 2012

    Liberal Arts

    AA

    73

    60

    35

    82.2%

    47.9%

    Major

    Degree

    New FT
    Fall 2012

    Persisted
    Spring 2013

    Retained
    Fall 2013

    Persistence
    Spring 2013

    Retention Fall 2013

    Liberal Arts

    AA

    62

    49

    32

    79.0%

    51.6%

    The data shows that persistence rates during the Spring 2012 and Spring 2013 semesters dropped 3.2% although overall the persistence rates were pretty high running in the 80 to 70 percent rates.


    G. Student retention rate (Fall-to-Fall for two-year programs; Fall-to-Spring for one-year programs)

    The retention rate from Fall 2012 to Fall 2013 remained steady with a slight increase of 3.7% (see table above)


    H. Success rates on licensing or certification exams (CTE, TP, Nursing, etc)

    Not Applicable—Liberal Arts students are not required to take any exams for licensing or certification.


    I. Graduation rate based on yearly number

    Graduates - New Students (Full Time) by Academic Year and Major

    Major

    Degree

    Enrollment

    AY2011/12

    AY2012/13

    Graduates

    GradRate100%

    GradRate150%

    Liberal Arts

    AA

    77

    1

    10

    11

    1.3%

    14.3%

    Graduates

    Major

    Degree

    AY2010/11

    AY2011/12

    AY2012/13

    Liberal Arts

    AA

    67

    46

    61

    Based on the above data, during this assessment cycle, only 1.3% of the Liberal Arts graduates were able to complete the program within two years. Within three years, the rate increased by 13% resulting in a graduation rate of 14.3%. This shows that very few students are able to complete the program in the allotted two year period. When given a little bit more time to complete over the two year period, nine times more students were able to complete the program. The low graduation rates has propelled the Languages and Literature division into reviewing the credit requirements, the suggested course schedule that students follow (there is no room for failure or make-up and typically for some courses, students need more time as they do repeat courses) course pre-requisites and the program courses’ connection to other programs.


    J. Students seat cost



    Combined cost per credit hour AY 2012-2013 for Liberal Arts program

    Program

    Fall 2012

    Spring 2013

    Summer 2013

    Liberal Arts (AA)

    47

    83

    33

    *data provided by IRPO

    The cost of running the Liberal Arts program when compared to other programs is fairly low and despite servicing a large number of students, is consistent and is not considered to be a high cost program. Costs are higher in the Spring than the Fall and Summer, mainly due to the higher number of courses that are offered in Spring based on student need. The persistence rate from Fall the Spring is higher, indicating that many students in the program continue from Fall to Spring yet do not necessarily continue in the following Summer or Fall semesters thus contributing to the low retention rates. High persistence from Fall to Spring is reflected in the higher cost of running the program in Spring than Fall.


    K. Cost of duplicate or redundant courses, programs or services

    Not Applicable


    L. Students' satisfaction rate

    Results from Summer 2013 Student Satisfaction Survey for Major (Liberal Arts)

    Answer Options

    Strongly Agree

    Agree

    Disagree

    Strongly Disagree

    Response Count

    1. Faculty care about me as an individual.

    9

    24

    4

    1

    38

    2. My academic advisor is approachable.

    18

    19

    1

    0

    38

    3. Classes are scheduled at times that are convenient for

    8

    22

    7

    1

    38

    4. Internships or practical experiences are provided in my

    8

    21

    8

    1

    38

    5. My academic advisor helps me set goals to work

    14

    21

    2

    0

    37

    6. Library resources and services are adequate.

    16

    17

    4

    1

    38

    7. I am able to register for classes I need with few

    9

    22

    6

    1

    38

    8. The quality of instruction I receive in most of my

    9

    26

    3

    0

    38

    9. Faculty are understanding of students' unique life

    4

    22

    12

    0

    38

    10. My academic advisor is concerned about my success

    10

    27

    1

    0

    38

    11. It is an enjoyable experience to be a student on this

    18

    18

    1

    1

    38

    12. Faculty are fair and unbiased in their treatment of

    9

    22

    6

    1

    38

    13. My academic advisor is knowledgeable about my

    14

    23

    1

    0

    38

    14. Students are made to feel welcome on this campus.

    15

    20

    2

    1

    38

    15. Faculty take into consideration student differences as

    11

    22

    5

    0

    38

    16. My academic advisor is knowledgeable about the

    11

    23

    4

    0

    38

    17. The equipment in the lab facilities is kept up to date.

    4

    25

    7

    2

    38

    18. Class change (drop/add) policies are reasonable.

    12

    20

    4

    0

    38

    19. I generally know what's happening on campus.

    9

    18

    9

    2

    38

    20. Faculty provide timely feedback about student

    14

    17

    7

    0

    38

    21. Tutoring services are readily available.

    14

    16

    8

    0

    38

    22. This school does whatever it can to help me reach

    14

    17

    6

    1

    38

    23. The assessment and course placement procedures

    13

    20

    4

    1

    38

    24. Faculty are interested in my academic problems.

    8

    20

    8

    2

    38

    25. Nearly all of the faculty are knowledgeable in their

    11

    17

    5

    2

    35

    26. Faculty are usually available after class and during

    10

    22

    4

    0

    36

    27. Nearly all classes deal with practical experiences and

    8

    21

    8

    0

    37

    28. Students are notified early in the term if they are

    12

    20

    6

    0

    38

    29. Program requirements are clear and reasonable.

    13

    20

    4

    1

    38

    30. There is a good variety of courses suitable for my

    15

    20

    2

    1

    38

    31. I am able to experience intellectual growth here.

    10

    26

    2

    0

    38

    32. The campus faculty/staff are caring and helpful.

    8

    26

    3

    1

    38

    33. My academic advisor is available when I need help.

    15

    20

    3

    0

    38

    34. I am able to register for classes I need with few

    11

    18

    7

    1

    37

    35. My advisor helps me apply my program of study to

    12

    24

    2

    0

    38

    36. Computer labs are adequate and accessible.

    12

    15

    7

    3

    37

    The questions in which students who were surveyed expressed the highest dissatisfaction were on the following questions:

    • Questions about scheduling (question #3): 7 disagree/1 strongly disagree
    • Questions about faculty (questions #9; 24): 29 disagree/2 strongly disagree
    • Questions about practical experiences in classes/program (#4;27): 16 D; 1 SD
    • Questions about services-tutoring/labs/registration(#17;21;36): 22 D; 5 SD
    • Question about campus happenings (#19): 9 Disagree; 2 strongly disagree

    M. Alumni data

    Not Available

    N. Employment data and employer feedback (employer surver)

    Not Available

    O. Program added or cancelled at nearby regional institutions (PCC, GCC, Hawaii schools, UOG, CMI, NMC)

    Not Available


    Transfer rate

    Not Available: The Languages and Literature division is currently working on coming up with a template of a form that our graduates will be filling in to help keep track of the movement of our graduates. Collaboration with the office of Admissions and Records is also needed to help identify students who transfer (via transcript requests) and also to identify Liberal Arts students who further their studies here at the college by pursuing second degrees and enrolling in third-year programs.

  9. Analysis

    Findings
    This section provides discussion of information discovered as a result of the evaluation such as problems or concerns with the program and what part of the program is working well and meeting expectation.

    1. The division is currently dialoguing about the sequence of courses and suggested course schedule and will be looking into making modifications of the sequencing so that students are first encouraged to take 100-level courses prior to taking the upper 200-level courses. Changes in the upper level pre-requisites are also under discussion as there is a need to have students taking preparatory classes so that there may be a higher possibility of success in 2nd year, upper-level courses. This may also help to improve the low graduation rates of students graduating within two years from the start of their enrollment.
    2. Coherence, content, format and conventions are all areas that our students need more help with, especially when it comes to writing. The assessment results show that all of our students need more help with the basic content of most of the classes, proving that without the basic understanding, critical thinking is not possible.
    3. The Enrollment data confirms the downward decline in enrollment in the major. The enrollment figures show a drastic drop in enrollment at the state campuses between the Fall and the Spring semesters. This drop in enrollment could be due to students transferring to the National campus and changing their majors as many ‘undecided’ majors are by default, counted as Liberal Arts majors.
    4. Completion rates show that overall rates were higher during the spring semesters as compared to the Fall semesters. The lowest passing rate was in the Health Science course with a rate of 27.8% while the Humanities courses boasted the highest passing rates with student passing rates for the foreign languages, history, music and arts classes ranging from the high 70s to 100% passing rates consistently across the board. Social science courses had the next highest passing rates, followed by English classes and the natural science courses.
    5. Based on the responses from the Student satisfaction survey, the Liberal Arts program needs to work on improving the scheduling of classes, faculty need to show more interest in students’ lives and academic problems; some effort is needed to add a practical element to classes and services such as tutoring, lab times and equipment and registration can be improved to better serve the needs of students.
    6. Transfer and Alumni data is needed so that we can gauge the success of our program beyond their time here at the college.

    Recommendations
    This section provides recommendations from the program on what to do to improve or enhance the quality of program and course learning outcomes as well as program goals and objectives. This section should also include suggestions that describe how the program might be able to create opportunities for a better program in the future. Some examples are exploring alternate delivery mechanisms, forming external partnerships, or realigning with other programs.

    1. Based on course level assessments, many of the faculty are in favor of making EN 120a and b pre-requisites to the many 200-level English courses so that students are better equipped to succeed in these upper-level courses. The suggested schedule will need to be changed when the college catalog is next updated to shift all 200-level courses to the second year after students have completed the requisite 100-level courses. This will hopefully lead to more success for students in the upper-level program courses.
    2. All program faculty need to stress these four areas in their teaching and in their teaching of basic skills such as reading and writing. It is commonly understood that many students do not transfer skills (such as writing/writing format and conventions) from one class to another therefore, faculty from other programs need to help with encouraging and consistently requiring that when students write in their classes that they follow formats and conventions, thus emphasizing these skills across the board.
    3. There needs to be a better way of tracking students who are enrolled in the major mainly by default or those who are there by choice. The default role that this program plays greatly affects the number of students who ‘drop out’ from the major and may be the reason for the movement of students in and out of the program.
    4. Review of the courses with the lowest passing rates needs to be done to assess why students are consistently failing in these courses and why the numbers remain high. Working and discussions with faculty who have high passing rates should be encouraged so that we can aid each other in finding out what works best with our students and what is not working. Lecturing has not traditionally been a well-received method of teaching for our students. Exploration and use of other methods should be piloted, assessed then reported on whether they are successful or not.
    5. The improvements to increase student satisfaction is needed to be done as a collective effort from not only the Liberal Arts program faculty but also from student services and the office of the VPIA as some of these areas are beyond the scope and capabilities of the Liberal Arts faculty.
    6. The program faculty will work with OAR, the Alumni organization and the counselors to start in the collecting of data from students who are to graduate. An exit exam for Liberal Arts graduates will be worked on to be given to students starting next year.

Unit Assessment Report

Report Period: 2013-2014

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