Agriculture and Food Technology

  • PSLO
  • Data Sheet
  • Program Review
  • Assessment Report

Program Student Learning Outcomes Assessment
(AY 2013-2014)

Program Student Learning Outcomes(PSLOs)

At the completion of Agriculture and Food Technology Program the student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate overall knowledge of the crop production process,
  2. Practice good agricultural management and marketing skills,
  3. Identify and demonstrate the fundamentals of food processing, preparation techniques, the relationship between the scientific principle and cooking procedures
  4. Identify and demonstrate the basic skills and principles of swine and poultry production techniques, including breed selection, feed, housing, management techniques and animal health,
  5. Apply the basic skills and knowledge of nursery micro-propagation practices, transplanting, harvesting, and maintenance,
  6. Identify the proper use of land for agriculture purposes, local ornamental, and turf management.

PSLO Assessment Report Summary

What we looked at:

The Agriculture and Food Technology certificate,assessment focused on PSLOs 2, 3, 4, and 6. Listed below are the results for each of the PSLOs.

What we found:

  • PSLO#2: Results was based on number of students taken related courses in Spring 2013 and Fall 2013. Spring 2013 24 students' enrolled and 84% were exemplary. Fall 2013 27 students enrolled 74% were exemplary.
  • PSLO#3: Results is based on passing and completion rate from Fall 2012 to Spring 2013 in related courses. Fall 2012 82% of students were exemplary. Spring 2013 58% were exemplary. In all, total of 52 students enrolled in related courses and out of 52 14 were unsatisfactory and 73% were exemplary.
  • PSLO#4: 42 students completed related course during Spring 2013 and 33 out 45 were exemplary. 73% show good progress. Summer 2014 25 students' enrolled and 70% were exemplary.
  • PSLO#6: Total of 55 students enrolled and completed related course in Fall 2013. 6 out of 55 were unsatisfactory. 89% were exemplary.

What are we planning to work on

Modify existing program requirements and courses to meet students' needs and improve retention and completion rates.

Modify suggested schedule of courses to begin the student’s course of study with basic fundamental courses.

Recommendations for students:

• Students are encouraged to seek advice from academic advisors, program supervisors or Division Chairs prior to declaring major in this program. Students need to have strong fundamental skills in English, math, and science in order to be successful in this program.


Program Data Sheet
Spring 2014

Download PDF Version of the Data Sheet

Enrollment by Major and Campus

Major:

Degree

Term

Chuuk

Kosrae

National

Pohnpei

Yap

Students

Agriculture and Food Technology

CA

Fall 2011

 

23

 

105

7

135

Agriculture and Food Technology

CA

Fall 2012

 

26

 

98

21

145

Agriculture and Food Technology

CA

Fall 2013

 

43

 

101

26

170

Agriculture and Food Technology

CA

Spring 2011

 

23

 

77

17

117

Agriculture and Food Technology

CA

Spring 2012

 

24

 

76

9

109

Agriculture and Food Technology

CA

Spring 2013

 

27

 

81

23

131

Agriculture and Food Technology

CA

Spring 2014

 

28

 

86

28

142



Credits by Major and Campus

Major:

Degree

Term

Chuuk

Kosrae

National

Pohnpei

Yap

Credits

Agriculture and Food Technology

CA

Fall 2011

 

213

 

1126

64

1403

Agriculture and Food Technology

CA

Fall 2012

 

297

 

1068

256

1621

Agriculture and Food Technology

CA

Fall 2013

 

442

 

995

274

1711

Agriculture and Food Technology

CA

Spring 2011

 

238

 

911

189

1338

Agriculture and Food Technology

CA

Spring 2012

 

248

 

858

96

1202

Agriculture and Food Technology

CA

Spring 2013

 

261

 

844

299

1404

Agriculture and Food Technology

CA

Spring 2014

 

317

 

937

298

1552



Credits by Program and Campus

Program

Term

Chuuk

Kosrae

National

Pohnpei

Yap

Credits

Agriculture and Food Technology (CA)

Fall 2011

 

200

5

647

64

916

Agriculture and Food Technology (CA)

Fall 2012

 

158

 

629

228

1015

Agriculture and Food Technology (CA)

Fall 2013

 

310

 

598

173

1081

Agriculture and Food Technology (CA)

Spring 2011

90

144

 

387

39

660

Agriculture and Food Technology (CA)

Spring 2012

 

193

 

555

117

865

Agriculture and Food Technology (CA)

Spring 2013

 

209

18

575

127

929

Agriculture and Food Technology (CA)

Spring 2014

 

243

 

533

167

943



Credits Enrolled, Attempted and Earned(averages)

Major

Degree

Term

CredEnrollAvg

CredAttAvg

CredEarnAvg

TermGPAAvg

Agriculture and Food Technology

CA

Fall 2011

10.4

9.5

7.9

2.08

Agriculture and Food Technology

CA

Fall 2012

11.2

10.2

8.7

2.21

Agriculture and Food Technology

CA

Fall 2013

10.1

9.5

8.4

2.16

Agriculture and Food Technology

CA

Spring 2011

11.4

10.0

8.5

2.19

Agriculture and Food Technology

CA

Spring 2012

11.0

10.0

7.6

1.95

Agriculture and Food Technology

CA

Spring 2013

10.7

9.1

7.8

1.89

Agriculture and Food Technology

CA

Spring 2014

10.9

9.3

8.2

2.44



Program Sections, Enrollment Ratio and Average Class Size

Program

Term

Section

EnrollMax

Enrollment

EnrollRatio

AvgClassSize

Agriculture and Food Technology (CA)

Fall 2011

14

343

253

73.8%

18.1

Agriculture and Food Technology (CA)

Fall 2012

16

362

289

79.8%

18.1

Agriculture and Food Technology (CA)

Fall 2013

16

384

316

82.3%

19.8

Agriculture and Food Technology (CA)

Spring 2011

11

289

207

71.6%

18.8

Agriculture and Food Technology (CA)

Spring 2012

16

386

250

64.8%

15.6

Agriculture and Food Technology (CA)

Spring 2013

15

381

242

63.5%

16.1

Agriculture and Food Technology (CA)

Spring 2014

14

316

279

88.3%

19.9



Persistence and Retention (new full time students)

Major Description

Degree

New Students FT 2011_3

Students 2012_1

Students 2012_3

Persistence Spring 2012

Retention Fall 2012

Agriculture and Food Technology

CA

26

32

20

123.1%

76.9%


Major

Degree

New FT Fall 2012

Persisted Spring 2013

Retained Fall 2013

Persistence Spring 2013

Retention Fall 2013

Agriculture and Food Technology

CA

56

57

40

101.8%

71.4%

Agriculture and Food Technology

CA

NE

35

32

91.4%

 



Course Completion & Withdrawals (Major)

Major

Degree

Term

Students

ABCorP%

ABCDorP%

W%

Agriculture and Food Technology

CA

Fall 2011

480

70.0%

81.5%

7.1%

Agriculture and Food Technology

CA

Fall 2012

411

67.4%

79.6%

5.6%

Agriculture and Food Technology

CA

Fall 2013

507

68.2%

83.0%

4.1%

Agriculture and Food Technology

CA

Spring 2011

376

66.8%

79.3%

6.1%

Agriculture and Food Technology

CA

Spring 2012

366

60.4%

71.9%

8.2%

Agriculture and Food Technology

CA

Spring 2013

414

58.5%

71.5%

15.5%

Agriculture and Food Technology

CA

Spring 2014

466

68%

74%

14%



Course Completion & Withdrawals (Program)

Program

Term

Students

ABCorP%

ABCDorP%

W%

Agriculture and Food Technology (CA)

Fall 2011

264

68.9%

81.8%

6.8%

Agriculture and Food Technology (CA)

Fall 2012

302

74.5%

84.1%

5.5%

Agriculture and Food Technology (CA)

Fall 2013

329

68.1%

82.7%

4.4%

Agriculture and Food Technology (CA)

Spring 2011

216

65.3%

80.6%

8.1%

Agriculture and Food Technology (CA)

Spring 2012

270

63.7%

73.3%

11.5%

Agriculture and Food Technology (CA)

Spring 2013

295

60.0%

70.8%

12.7%

Agriculture and Food Technology (CA)

Spring 2014

279

74%

78%

10%



Graduates

Major

Degree

AY2010/11

AY2011/12

AY2012/13

Agriculture and Food Technology

CA

10

15

28



Graduate Rates

Major

Degree

Cohort

New Full Students

Graduation Rate 100%

Graduation Rate 150%

Graduation Rate 200%

Agriculture and Food Technology

CA

Fall 2008 FT

18

11.1%

33.3%

33.3%

Agriculture and Food Technology

CA

Fall 2009 FT

17

23.5%

41.2%

47.1%

Agriculture and Food Technology

CA

Fall 2010 FT

33

18.2%

33.3%

 

  • Data based on SIS extracts December 2013 expect for graduates information.
  • Program" information is based on Dickerson's concept of a "program" as expending resoruces and is linked to courses owned by a program from TracDat
  • Graduation rates are based on Fall new students(full time) cohorts that are tracked at 100%, 150%, and 200%
  • Retention rates are based on Fall new students (full time) cohorts who return the following fall semester
  • Persistence rates are based on Fall new students (full time) cohorts who return the following spring semester

Program Review (Pohnpei Campus)

AP Full Official:Certificate of Achievement in Agriculture and Food Technology

Campus: Pohnpei Campus

Completed by: Charles Aiseam

AP Review Submission Date:March 28 2014

AR Review Cycle: Fall 2012- 2014

  1. Program Mission

    The mission of the Agriculture and Food Technology (AFT) certificate program is to prepare students to become farmers or for employment in different various agriculture and food technology related areas or for the pursuit of advanced degrees in agriculture or food technology at COM-FSM or abroad by educating them in the fundamental concepts, knowledge, and laboratory/field techniques and skills of agriculture and food technology.(Recommended)

  2. Program Goals

    1. Demonstrate an overall knowledge of the crop production process,
    2. Practice good agricultural management and marketing skills,
    3. Identify and demonstrate the fundamentals of food processing, preparation techniques, the relationship between the scientific principle and cooking procedures
    4. Identify and demonstrate the basic skills and principles of swine and poultry production techniques, including breed selection, feed, housing, management techniques and animal health,
    5. Apply the basic skills and knowledge of nursery micro-propagation practices, transplanting, harvesting, and maintenance,
    6. Identify the proper use of land for agriculture purposes, local ornamental, and turf management.
  3. Program History

    The Agriculture and Food Technology Certificate of Achievement (AFT) was dormant for many years even though the program already existed. Students were not interested in getting a certificate in the program. Farming was considered dirty and parents talked their kids out of enrolling into the program. As the AFT lay dormant it also affected the degree program at COM-FSM National Campus.
    In 2008 program started again with the assistant of the US Department of Agriculture Resident Instruction in the Insular Areas CariPac project which funded the Coordinator. The program re-opened with 10 students. This has progressed over the years and so far 53 students have graduated with a certificate in AFT from 2010 to 2013.

  4. Program Descriptions

    Agriculture and Food Technology Certificate of Achievement offers courses that are aligned with the degree program offered at COM-FSM National Campus. The program focuses on training of students to continue on to the degree program and it also prepares student for the work force. Students will be able to take on jobs such as technicians or farming depending on their choices for the future.

    With the increasing complexity of technology and the competitiveness of the export market, trained agriculture technicians are in demand. The program aims to prepare individuals to enter the agriculture profession in the public or private sector

    Knowledge of agricultural production processes and good communication and management skills will enable students, to become extension agents and farmers that will be able work in all phases of food production.

  5. Program Admission Requirements

    As per college policy for admission to Certificate of Achievement programs.

  6. Program Certificate/Degree Requirements

    Certificate of Completion
            General Education Requirements....................13 credits

                     CA 095 Basic Computer Applications (3)
                     ESL 050 Technical English 050 (3)
                     MS 104 Technical Math I (4)
                     SC 098 Survey of Science (3))

    Technical Requirements..........................21 or 22 credits
             AG 084 Basic Crop Production (4)
             AG 096 Field Internship (5)

    Plus a minimum of 12 credits from the following:

                     AG 086 Micro-Propagation (4)
                     AG 088 Landscaping (3)
                     AG 090 Principles of Food Processing (3)
                     AG 092 Swine and Poultry Production (3)
                     AG 094 Farm Management and Marketing (3)

    TTotal Requirements.........................34 -35Credits

  7. Program Courses and Enrollment

    Course# Course Title # of Sections # of Students Semester offered
    AG 084 Crop Production: 2 25-30 fall
    AG 096 Ag. Internship 1 20-30 Summer
    AG 088 Landscaping: 2 25-30 fall
    AG 092 Poultry Production: 2 25-30 Spring
    AG 094 Farm Management: 2 25-30 Spring
    AG 086 Micro-Propatation: 2 25-30 Spring
    AG 090 Food Processing: 2 25-30 Fall
  8. Program Faculty

    Instructor Position Degrees Held Status
    Charles Aiseam Instructor AS in Gen. Agriculture (COM-FSM)
    BS in Tropical Agriclture (University of Guam)
    Full time Faculty
           
    Engly Ioanis Instructor BS in Agriculture
    MS in Animal Science
    Part-time Faculty

    Instructor to Student ratio:
    Fall 2012: 2 instructors for 98 students
    Spring 2013: 1 instructor for 130 students
    Fall 2013: 1 instructor for 126 students
    Spring 2014: 1 instructor for 130 students

  9. Program Indicators

    1. Assessment of course student learning outcomes of program courses

    https://comfsm.tracdat.com/tracdat/faces/assessment/reports/au.jsp

    2. Assessment of program student learning outcomes

    https://comfsm.tracdat.com/tracdat/faces/assessment/reports/au.jsp



    3. Program enrollment (historical enrollment patterns, student credits by major)

    Course Fall 2012 Spring 2013 Summer 2013 Fall 2013 Spring 2014 Total
    AG 084: Basic Crop Not Offered Not Offered Not Offered 26 27 53
    AG086: Micro-propagation Not Offered Not Offered Not Offered Not Offered Not Offered N/A
    AG088: Landscaping 55 Not offered Not Offered 24 23 102
    AG090: Food Processing 28 29 Not Offered Not Offered 55 112
    AG094: Farm management and marketing Not Offered 28 Not offered 54 Not offered 82
    AG092: Swine and Poultry production Not Offered 57 Not Offered 22 Not Offered 79
    AG096: Field Internship 15 16 2 Not Offered 25 58
    Total Enrollment 98 130 2 126 130 486

    None is provided by IRPO. Overall total enrollment in the program is increasing e.g., 98 in fall2012 to 130 in spring 2014. Course enrollment appears to fluctuate, but this is simply a result of course not being offered for several courses.

    4.Average class size

    Program Term Section EnrollMax Enrollment EnrollRatio Avg Class Size
    Agriculture and Food Technology (CA) Fall 2011 14 343 253 73.8% 18.1
    Agriculture and Food Technology (CA) Fall 2012 16 362 289 79.8% 18.1
    Agriculture and Food Technology (CA) Fall 2013 16 384 316 82.3% 19.8
    Agriculture and Food Technology (CA) Spring 2011 11 289 207 71.6% 18.8
    Agriculture and Food Technology (CA) Spring 2012 16 386 250 64.8% 15.6
    Agriculture and Food Technology (CA) Spring 2013 15 381 242 63.5% 16.1

    This is a data provided by IRPO. It shows the results of all state campuses that offered AFT certificate programs. Data trend doesn’t increases and decreases but it fluctuates.

    5.Course completion rate

    Course Completion & Withdrawals (Major)
    Major Degree Term Students ABC or P% ABCD or P% W %
    Agriculture and Food Technology CA Fall 2012 480 70.0% 81.5% 7.1%
    Agriculture and Food Technology CA Fall 2013 411 67.4% 79.6% 5.6%
    Agriculture and Food Technology CA Fall 2013 507 68.2% 83.0% 4.1%
    Agriculture and Food Technology CA Spring 2012 366 60.4% 71.9% 8.2%
    Agriculture and Food Technology CA Spring 2013 414 58.5% 71.5% 15.5%


    Course Completion & Withdrawals (Program)
    Program Term Students ABC or P% ABCD or P% W %
    Agriculture and Food Technology (CA) Fall 2011 264 68.9% 81.8% 6.8%
    Agriculture and Food Technology (CA) Fall 2012 302 74.5% 84.1% 5.5%
    Agriculture and Food Technology (CA) Fall 2013 329 68.1% 82.7% 4.4%
    Agriculture and Food Technology (CA) Spring 2011 216 65.3% 80.6% 8.1%
    Agriculture and Food Technology (CA) Spring 2012 270 63.7% 73.3% 11.5%
    Agriculture and Food Technology (CA) Spring 2013 295 60.0% 70.8% 12.7%

    Data provided by IRPO and is based on results from all state campuses. It shows that number of students completing the program is increasing from Fall 2011 to Spring 2013. As well as number of withdrawals. Number of withdrawals increases as a result of students passing the COMET. For instance, students who pass the COMET while majoring in AFT tends to transferred immediately down to degree program and never complete the certificate program.

    6. Student persistence rate (semester to semester) & Student retention rate (Fall-to-Fall for two-year programs; Fall-to-Spring for one-year programs)

    Major Description Degree New Student FT 2011_3 Students 2012_1 Students 2012_3 Persistence Spring 2012% Retention Fall 2012
    Agriculture and Food Technology CA 26% 32 20 123.1% 76.9%

    Major Description Degree New FT Fall 2012 Persisted Spring 2013 Retained Fall 2013 Persistence Spring 2013 Retention Fall 2013
    Agriculture and Food Technology CA 56 57 40 101.8% 71.4%

    Data is provided by IRPO and also based on all State campuses. Data shown that persistence and retention rate is decreasing as a result of students on academic probation and were unable to continue next semester. It could also be affected by number of students passing the COMET test.

    7. Success rates on licensing or certification exams (CTE, TP, Nursing, etc)

    N/A

    8. Graduation rate based on yearly number

    Major Degree Cohort New Full Students Graduation Rate 100% Graduation Rate 150% Graduation Rate 200%
    AFT CA Fall 2008FT 18 11.1 33.3% 33.3%
    AFT CA Fall 2009FT 17 23.5% 41.2% 47.1%
    AFT CA Fall 2010FT 33 18.2% 33.3%  

    Graduates
    Major Degree AY2010/11 AY2010/11 AY2012/13
    Agriculture and Food Technology CA 10 15 28

    Data is provided by IRPO and also based on results from all State Campus that offered AFT certificate program. Since after re-opening the program, number of students graduated have increased over the years.

    9.Students seat costk

    Term # of Credits $/Credit # of Students Total
    Fall 2012 14 105 98 $144,060
    Spring 2013 17 115 130 $254,150
    Summer 2013 5 115 2 $1,150
    Fall 2013 13 115 126 $188,370
    Spring 2014 18 115 130 $269,100
    Grand Total $856,830

    Formula for calculating seat cost is provided by IRPO.

    10. Cost of duplicate or redundant courses, programs or services

    N/A

    11. Students' satisfaction rate

    Awaiting data from IRPO

    12. Alumni data

    N/A

    13. Employment data and employer feedback (employer survey)

    None is provided by IRPO. Data is collected through surveys completed by AFT graduates. Overall, data is insufficient as result of students didn’t show up or failed to complete or submit surveys. The survey is a form of questionnaires asking students their current situations and their plans of furthering their education.

    Job Description Number
    Farm Technican 1
    Government Sectors 0
    Private Sectors 4
    Farmer (Family-own) 4
    Total 4

    14.Program added or cancelled at nearby regional institutions (PCC, GCC, Hawaii schools, UOG, CMI, NMC)

    N/A

    15. Transfer Rate

    College/Universary # of Students
    College of Micronesia-FSM 15
    Universary of Guam 0
    NMC, Saipan 0
    GCC, Guam; 0
    PCC, Palau 1
    UH, Hawaii 0

    None is provided by IRPO, however, the coordinator of the program and other program faculties have personal contact via email and social network with transferred alumni.

  • Analysis and Recommendation

    Finding
    This section provides discussion of information discovered as a result of the evaluation such as problems or concerns with the program and what part of the program is working well and meeting expectation.

    Although total enrollment and graduation rate are rising in this program, it has become apparent that the program and course student learning outcomes needs to be revised to better suit the requirements of the program and the students. For example: Furthermore, a number of the courses SLOS are not explained well and require modifications specifically for;
    ESL 050, AG 084, AG 086, AG 088, AG 090 and AG 092.

    Students who completed ESL050 have shown little knowledge in writing lab reports. Lab reports is 30% of their grades in all major require courses, and failing to complete a vast majority of lab reports can result in withdrawal or failing the course. This is very evident in the increases of withdrawal rate and decreases in persistence and retention rate. Other major required courses needs modification so it can better equipped students with the needed knowledge for advance level. AFT graduates who transferred to higher level of education find it really difficult to cope with the materials being taught at higher level.

    Recommendation:

    This section provides recommendations from the program on what to do to improve or enhance the quality of program and course learning outcomes as well as program goals and objectives. This section should also include suggestions that describe how the program might be able to create opportunities for a better program in the future. Some examples are exploring alternate delivery mechanisms, forming external partnerships, or realigning with other programs.

    Recommendations for requested courses

    1. ESL 050: The required technical English needs to be modified to meet the need of the program. Preferred a higher English level to suit the program. Most of the students have tough time reading science books. Agriculture is an applied science. Most of the works used in this program are not easy to comprehend by students who completed ESL 050. To better equip students for the AS degree or work force the program needs a higher English level.
    2. AG 084 Basic Crop production: - change to Crop production so it can be aligned with AG 110 and AG 128 at COM-FSM degree level which crop production.
    3. AG 086 Micro-Propagation: This course is really hard for the level of students that we get in the AFT certificate. The language that is used and the lab materials that are needed for this class are expensive. We have no lab for students to actually practice what is required by the course and so we do not meet the SLO for this particular course. I recommend that we modified this course and change its title to Greenhouse management. This can be aligned with AG281 at the degree level.
    4. AG 088 Landscaping:-change to Plant propagation. Landscaping is a very complex area that requires basic knowledge of engineering and architecture. For instance, reading and drawing blue print in class was difficult for students to comprehend. Since they’ve never seen a blue print or worked on a blue print before. Therefore, it is highly recommended that AG88 should change the title from Landscaping to Plant propagation, which is one of the areas that we rarely covered under Basic Crop Production. Plant propagation has more areas that are essential that cannot be covered in less than 2 weeks. Plant propagation can be aligned with AG 281 at degree level.
    5. AG 092 Swine and Poultry Production: change the course title to Principle of Animal Science. It is better to understand basic parts of animal before advancing into more specified parts of any specified animals.
    6. AG 090: Food Processing: Change the course title to food security. Since our kitchen lab at Pohnpei Campus is too small to accommodate both AFT and HTM students, therefore, we fail to meet the course SLO and PLO. So it is recommended to change the name of the course.
    7. Other recommendations for Program Learning Outcomes:
      • Some course learning outcomes did not link with the Program Learning Outcomes thus need modification.
      • All major required courses need modification so that they can be aligned with the degree program. For instance, current courses taught in AFT are missing certain areas that are also taught at the degree level.
      • Include a lab section to all agriculture courses at certificate level. Giving students more change to practice materials being taught in class hands-on.
      • Include AG 101: Introduction to Agriculture, to be part of Certificate level major requirement. The certificate level needs an introductory course to agriculture before they can advance to more specific areas in agriculture.
      • Modify SLO for SC098 to include basics to chemistry. Students having hard time understanding plant nutrients when chemistry is common in these areas. Program coordinator can work with the science department to modify SC098 before the end of Fall 2014
      • Include a higher level of English, like ESL 089 for instance, to General requirements for Certificate program. Another important part of agriculture is to report your findings. Completing only ESL 050, it was tougher for students to present their findings or even write a lab report. Program coordinator can work with the English department to modify ESL050 before the end of fall 2014.
      • Need to purchase lab equipments for lab activities. Due to lack of lab equipments, the program fail to satisfy some of their course learning outcomes that requires full understanding of performing lab experiment.
      • Create poster and brochures for program awareness. Since agriculture farmers and technicians are very demanding, it is highly recommended that the program created brochures and posters to promote the program and also improve number of enrollment.
  • Unit Assessment Report

    Report Period: 2013-2014

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