Accounting (TYC)

  • PSLO
  • Data Sheet
  • Program Review
  • Assessment Report

Program Student Learning Outcomes Assessment
(AY 2014-2015)

Program Student Learning Outcomes(PSLOS)

At the completion of Third Year Program in Accounting the student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of intermediate accounting principles by describing the financial reporting environment and the conceptual framework of financial accounting, analyzing financial statements in detail, and accounting for cash and receivables, inventories, property, plant and equipment, intangibles, liabilities, stockholders’ equity, and other special areas.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of cost accounting systems relevant to managerial-decision making, planning and control by solving problems involving various costing and budgeting methods; by applying financial, inventory and production management techniques in cost accounting; and by accurately measuring short- and long-term organizational performance.
  3. Demonstrate competence in analyzing and recording various transactions for state and local governments, the federal government, colleges and universities, and other nonprofit organizations; in preparing and interpreting financial statements; and in explaining differences between public and private sector accounting.
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of wide range of tax concepts with special focus on the taxation of business entities in the United States and the Federated States of Micronesia and a minor emphasis on the individual taxation in the two countries.
  5. Demonstrate an understanding of the statistical methods of sampling and estimating population statistics and competence in using computer software to calculate point estimates and confidence intervals and use statistical methods to test hypotheses, recognize trends and make forecasts to support decisions in the business/economics environment
  6. Apply knowledge acquired from accounting and other courses by solving real world accounting and general workplace problems in a particular organization in the COM-FSM Internship Program.
  • I=Introduced
  • D=Demonstrated
  • M=Mastery at a level appropriate for graduation

PSLO Assessment Report Summary

Looking back:

There are no program assessment data that are currently available, out of the previous cycle. The program was just revived last Spring.

The program opened again because students persistently requested for it, after they have realized their potential career advancement through this program.

What we looked at:

The Third Year Program General Business assessment was focused on ACC_PLO_1, ACC_PLO_2, ACC_PLO_3, and ACC_PLO_4.

ACC_PLO_1 made use of the assessment data from AC 320. Advance Assignments served as Pre-tests, and Quizzes functioned as Post Tests. Both of these were used to assess the PSLO and CSLO.

ACC_PLO_2 made use of the assessment data from AC 325. Advance Assignments served as Pre-tests, and Quizzes functioned as Post Tests. Advance Assignments served as Pre-tests, and Quizzes functioned as Post Tests. Both of these were used to assess the PSLO and CSLO.

AC_PLO_3 made use of the assessment data from AC 335. Advance Assignments served as Pre-tests, and Quizzes functioned as Post Tests. Advance Assignments served as Pre-tests, and Quizzes functioned as Post Tests. Both of these were used to assess the PSLO and CSLO.

AC_PLO_4 made use of the assessment data from BU/MS 310. Multiple Choice Pre-tests and Quizzes (which served as Post Test) were used to assess the PSLO and CSLO’s.

What we found:

ACC_PLO_1. Based on the results of the assessment activity, at the end of the semester, in general, 100% of the students were able to demonstrate an understanding of intermediate accounting principles by describing the financial reporting environment and the conceptual framework of financial accounting, analyzing assignments and financial statements in detail, and accounting for cash and receivables, and inventories. Their skills in property, plant and equipment and intangibles, liabilities, stockholders’ equity, and other special areas are yet to be assessed in AC 321.

ACC_PLO_2. The assessment activity results confirmed that in general, 100% of the students were able to demonstrate an understanding of cost accounting systems relevant to managerial-decision making, planning and control by solving problems involving various costing and budgeting methods; by applying financial, inventory and production management techniques in cost accounting; and by accurately measuring short- and long-term organizational performance.

ACC_PLO_3. The results of the assessment activity also show that in general,100% of the students demonstrated competence in analyzing and recording various transactions for state and local governments, the federal government, colleges and universities, and other nonprofit organizations; in preparing and interpreting financial statements; and in explaining differences between public and private sector accounting.

ACC_PLO_4. In this assessment activity, only 77% of the students were able to demonstrate their understanding of statistical methods of sampling and estimating population statistics. This course builds on students’ basic knowledge and skills in statistics (MS 150) in their AS Business degree. However, students found difficulty in the first two General CSLO’s.

Shown below is the summary of the assessment results

What we are planning to work on:

At first glance, it would seem that there is indeed very satisfactory results of the assessment activities conducted. But then, there are still areas of improvement that instructors have pointed out, that will address certain problem areas so that students will have a much more meaningful learning experience of the courses.

ACC_PLO_1. Give more varied problems for students, which they can access on paper and online. There are various online quizzes from different accounting resource websites, which students take at their choice and as per advise of the instructor to the students so they can polish their problem solving skills. It would be better if this would be given to them as part of their regular graded class-works, so that they can immediately get feedback on their performance and explanations to the answers. Of course, in this case, a need for one computer for one student would be required.

ACC_PLO_2. Review and give problems to students the some topics, which they have already taken in AC 250 such as Cost Concepts and Behavior because this very much needed on many specific CSLO’s of the course. Also, correlate this topic in the current lessons in this course. Another recommendation is to assist students analyze problems, because students are very much challenged by language barriers. This difficulty can also be overcome by giving a wider variety of online problems to students, wherein which immediate feedback can be facilitated. This would also need one computer per student.

ACC_PLO_3. Review students the accounting cycle, and repeatedly contrast the current lesson with the lessons in AC 131, and AC 220. Give more time-bounded online class-works and quizzes to students, and provide immediate feedback. This would likewise need a computer for each student.

ACC_PLO4. Give more exercises that will refresh the students’ knowledge on statistical methods, to enhance student engagement, and to strengthen their existing skills in statistics.

Recommendations for students:

  1. Polish their comprehension skills training offered in their AS in Business Administration program and from other various sources, so that they will encounter less difficulties answering problems.
  2. Consistently and diligently review on basic accounting concepts and finance tools that they have learned in their previous accounting courses, as they also need them in this program.
  3. Improve their mathematical and analytical skills by regularly solving various accounting and statistical problems, and solving them again, and again until they mastered how to solve those types of problems that even when numbers, names, and the manner in which the problems would be altered, they would still be able to solve them.

Enrollment by Major and Campus

Major:

Degree

Term

Chuuk

Kosrae

National

Pohnpei

Yap

Students

Accounting

TYC

Fall 2011

 

 

6

 

 

6

Accounting

TYC

Fall 2013

 

 

14

 

 

14

Accounting

TYC

Spring 2011

 

 

6

 

 

6

Accounting

TYC

Spring 2012

 

 

5

 

 

5

Accounting

TYC

Spring 2014

 

 

11

 

 

11



Credits by Major and Campus

Major:

Degree

Term

Chuuk

Kosrae

National

Pohnpei

Yap

Credits

Accounting

TYC

Fall 2011

 

 

69

 

 

69

Accounting

TYC

Fall 2013

 

 

177

 

 

177

Accounting

TYC

Spring 2011

 

 

60

 

 

60

Accounting

TYC

Spring 2012

 

 

60

 

 

60

Accounting

TYC

Spring 2014

 

 

105

 

 

105



Credits by Program and Campus

Program

Term

Chuuk

Kosrae

National

Pohnpei

Yap

Credits

Accounting (TYC)

Fall 2011

 

 

57

 

 

57

Accounting (TYC)

Fall 2013

 

 

234

 

 

234

Accounting (TYC)

Spring 2011

 

 

36

 

 

36

Accounting (TYC)

Spring 2012

 

 

36

 

 

36

Accounting (TYC)

Spring 2014

 

 

39

 

 

39



Credits Enrolled, Attempted and Earned(averages)

Major

Degree

Term

CredEnrollAvg

CredAttAvg

CredEarnAvg

TermGPAAvg

Accounting

TYC

Fall 2011

11.5

10.0

9.5

2.09

Accounting

TYC

Fall 2013

12.6

12.6

11.1

2.31

Accounting

TYC

Spring 2011

10.0

8.0

8.0

1.98

Accounting

TYC

Spring 2012

12.0

12.0

12.0

3.29

Accounting

TYC

Spring 2014

9.5

9.5

9.5

3.75



Program Sections, Enrollment Ratio and Average Class Size

Program

Term

Section

EnrollMax

Enrollment

EnrollRatio

AvgClassSize

Accounting (TYC)

Fall 2011

3

75

17

22.7%

5.7

Accounting (TYC)

Fall 2013

5

100

72

72.0%

14.4

Accounting (TYC)

Spring 2011

2

50

11

22.0%

5.5

Accounting (TYC)

Spring 2012

2

46

12

26.7%

6.0

Accounting (TYC)

Spring 2014

1

25

13

52.0%

13.0





Course Completion & Withdrawals (Major)

Major

Degree

Term

Students

ABCorP%

ABCDorP%

W%

Accounting

TYC

Fall 2011

23

73.9%

82.6%

13.0%

Accounting

TYC

Fall 2013

59

79.7%

88.1%

0.0%

Accounting

TYC

Spring 2011

15

53.3%

73.3%

26.7%

Accounting

TYC

Spring 2012

12

100.0%

100.0%

0.0%

Accounting

TYC

Spring 2014

35

100.0%

100.0%

0.0%



Course Completion & Withdrawals (Program)

Program

Term

Students

ABCorP%

ABCDorP%

W%

Accounting (TYC)

Fall 2011

19

63.2%

78.9%

10.5%

Accounting (TYC)

Fall 2013

78

76.9%

83.3%

6.4%

Accounting (TYC)

Spring 2011

12

66.7%

91.7%

8.3%

Accounting (TYC)

Spring 2012

12

100.0%

100.0%

0.0%

Accounting (TYC)

Spring 2014

13

100.0%

100.0%

0.0%



Graduates

Major

Degree

AY2010/11

AY2011/12

AY2012/13

AY2013/14

Accounting

TYC

5

3

 

 



  • "Program" information is based on Dickerson's concept of a "program" as expending resources and is linked to courses owned by a program from TracDat
  • Graduation rates are based on Fall new students(full time) cohorts that are tracked at 100%, 150%, and 200%
  • Retention rates are based on Fall new students (full time) cohorts who return the following fall semester
  • Persistence rates are based on Fall new students (full time) cohorts who return the following spring semester

 

Program Evaluation
Third Year Certificate in Accounting (TYC - Accounting)
As of October 31, 2011

Program Goals

 

The 3rd Year Certificate of Achievement in Accounting Program shall provide adequate technical skills and values training in the field of accounting that will enable the students achieve their goals, and help the FSM to attain economic development and self-reliance by:

  1. Equipping students with the accounting skills and values that will be valuable for real-life work and business environments, particularly on financial reporting, managerial accounting, accounting for government non-profit entities, and taxation;
  2. Establishing the required foundation for the students who intend to pursue further studies in other learning institutions; and
  3. Sharing and obtaining technical know-how with the community, government, private business sector and other academic institutions.

These program goals came from Mission and Outcomes Development Worksheet for 3rd Year Certificate in Accounting submitted on August 7, 2008.

Program History

In response to the needs of the business community for local employees with adequate training in the field of accounting, the Business Administration Division proposed the Third Year Certificate in Accounting Program in 2001. The college approved this program for implementation in the same year. The degree was first offered in Fall 2001 (College Catalog, 2007-2009).

Program Description

The Business Administration Division manages organization The TYC in Accounting Program, along with the CIS and Business Programs.

Description This program is geared at equipping the students with the knowledge and skills in Cost, Government and Intermediate Accounting courses, Taxation and Applied Statistics with on-the-job training through Accounting Internship in order to meet local employment demand and the admission requirements for further studies abroad in the field of accounting.

Program Admission Requirements

Applicants for admission into this program must meet these requirements:

        1. Graduate of any AS Degree
        2. Minimum GPA of 2.5
        3. Minimum Grade of C in Business Administration and AS Major Courses, and
        4. Admitted by the COM-FSM Admissions Board

Program Degree Requirements

In addition to three courses or 9-unit credits in General Education Core Requirements, the following are the Major Core Requirements:

 

Course No.

Course title

Unit Credits

  1.  

AC 320

Intermediate Accounting I

3

  1.  

AC 321

Intermediate Accounting II

3

  1.  

AC 325

Cost Accounting

3

  1.  

AC 330

Taxation

3

  1.  

AC 335

Government Accounting

3

  1.  

AC 370

Accounting Internship

3

  1.  

BU/MS 310

Applied Statistics

3

 

Program Courses and Enrollment

 

COURSE

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION*

 

PREREQUISITES*

ENROLLMENT

2011

2010

2009

TOTAL

AVERAGE

AC 320

This is a one-semester course that builds on the understanding of accounting principles developed in the 1st and 2nd accounting courses as well as managerial accounting. Topics include exploring the financial reporting environment, the conceptual framework of financial reporting; a detailed theoretical study of the financial statements; cash and receivables; inventories; property, plant and equipment (acquisition and depreciation/depletion) and of intangibles.

AC 220 and AC 250

7

6

5

18

6.00

AC 321

This course is a continuation of the first intermediate accounting course. The course is intended to further develop the student's competence in financial reporting. Topics covered will include accounting for: short- and long-term liabilities and contingencies, receivables, investments, and stockholders' equity. Special topics such as income recognition and measurement of net assets; leases; the cash flow statement; accounting changes and errors; and post-employment benefits will also be covered.

AC 320

3

6

7

16

5.33

AC 325

This is a one-semester course that covers cost accounting system output relevant to managerial decision-making, planning and control. The course builds on the foundation already established by the managerial accounting course completed by the student. Topics covered include absorption/variable costing and CVP analysis, relevant costing, budgeting, financial management, inventory and production management techniques, emerging management practices, responsibility accounting and transfer pricing, and measurement of short- and long-run organizational performance.

AC 250

 

7

6

 

 

AC 330

This is a one-semester first tax course aimed at introducing students to a wide range of tax concepts and types of taxpayers. While the course mainly focuses on the taxation of business entities in both the United States and in the Federated States of Micronesia, it also covers individual taxation in the two countries - individuals as proprietors, shareholders, or partners in business entities, and as employees.

AC 220 and AC 250

3

10

6

19

6.33

AC 335

This course is designed to be a survey of accounting for state and local governments, the federal government, colleges and universities, and other nonprofit organizations. It is expected that students will attain a basic understanding of accounting procedures in government and nonprofit organizations and appreciate the differences between private and public sector

AC 250

6

3

6

15

5.00

AC 370

This is a one-semester course designed to further build on the understanding of accounting principles and apply the knowledge so obtained to everyday business transactions (accounting practices). This will include accounting for long-term liabilities and investments; preparation of the cash flow statement; financial statement (ratio) analysis and interpretation; accounting for departments and branches; and a 120-hour internship program.

AC 320

2

6

5

13

4.33

BU/MS 310

The emphasis of the course is on the understanding of basic business math. This includes graphs, equations, ratio and proportion, percentage, and measurement systems to solve typical business problems such as the calculation of trade and cash discounts, markups, taxes, employee compensation, simple and compound interest, depreciation, inventory valuation, bonds and stocks, basic financial statement analysis, and business statistics

MS 100

7

18

13

38

12.67

* College Catalog 2009-2011,
**http://www.comfsm.fm/national/administration/VPA/researchdocs/data.html

CORE COURSES

PROGRAM LEARNING OBJECTIVES

1
Intermediate Accounting

2
Cost Accounting

3
Taxation

4
Government Accounting

5
Accounting Internship

6
Applied Statistics

AC 320

I, D

 

 

 

 

 

AC 321

M

 

 

 

 

 

AC 325

 

I, D

 

 

 

 

AC 330

 

 

M

 

 

 

AC 335

 

 

 

I, D

 

 

AC 370

M

M

M

M

M

M

BU/MS 310

 

 

 

 

 

M

Legend:
I - introduced
D - developed and practiced with feedback
M - demonstrated adequate knowledge and skills appropriate for graduation

Program Faculty (for Spring and Fall 2011)

NAME

DESIGNATION

MASTER’S DEEGREE

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

PROFESSIONAL LICENSE


MANGONON, GEORGE

Full-time Instructor / Chair, Math and Science Division – Pohnpei Campus

Master in Business Administration, Virgen Milagrosa University

Bachelor of Science in Mathematics, University of the Philippines

 

MEDALLA, MARIAN G.

Full-time Assistant Professor

Master of Business Administration, Notre Dame of Dadiangas College

Bachelor of Science in Accountancy, Mindanao State University

Certified Public Accountant - Philippines since 2001

 


PULMANO, RAFAEL

Full-time Assistant Professor

Master of Business Administration, National College of Business and Arts

Bachelor of Science in Commerce - Major in Accounting, St. Michael’s College of Laguna

Certified Public Accountant - Philippines since 1982

 

Program Outcome Analysis

Program Enrollment

Fall

Enrollment

%Change

2006*

6

 

2007*

8

33%

2008*

10

25%

2009^

7

-30%

2010^

4

-43%

2011 ^

8

100%

http://www.comfsm.fm/national/administration/VPA/researchdocs/data.html
^Instructors’ Class Lists

As can be gleaned from the foregoing table and further supported by the trend graph shown above, there is an erratic movement in the number of enrollees in the program. However, there was a dramatic increase in the enrollment in 2011.

By correlating the table above with both the graduation rate in the following page and further into the course completion rate information, the reasons for the changes in enrollment in certain terms may be partly attributed to the following:

Year

CHANGE

Possible Reasons

2007*

33%

Also from the Graduation Rate in this page, although no one graduated in Spring 2006, but the graduation rate for Spring 2007 rose to 57%.
In addition, the most recent completion rates were 69% in Fall 2006 and 100% in Spring 2007. This might just provided enrollees an impression that with due diligence, they can graduate from the course right on time.

2008*

25%

One reason for the increase can be credited to the average course completion rate of the previous school terms, 84% in Fall 2007 and 95% in Spring 2008.

2009^

-30%

After 2008, the policy of having a grade of “C” or better in all Business Courses was strictly implemented.
This is coupled by decreasing completion rates in most program core courses.

2010^

-43%

Although there was an improvement in the core course completion rates in 2009, but still some students refrained from pursuing a degree in this program because they perceived it as difficult
Also, returning and working students had problems balancing work and class demands.

2011^

100%

The increase can be attributed to intensive campaigns done by AS Business instructors, convincing students to pursue their TYC degree in the college.

*http://www.comfsm.fm/dev/irpo/datainfo.html
^Instructors’ Grading Sheets

Graduation Rate

Year

SPRING

Graduates

Enrollment

Rate

2008*

2

10

20%

2009^

1

7

14%

2010*

4

10

40%

2011*

2

3

67%

IRPO Graduates Academic Year 2.xlxs
^Instructor’s Invitation for Graduation

As what can be observed in the table above, there is an erratic trend in the number of graduates in relation to the number of enrollees in the program. This can be attributed to the following factors:

    1. Some students, who were enrolled in 2008, were then less prepared for the program. Some of them persisted until they were able to improve their grades until 2010, when the last one finally graduated from the program.
    2. In an informal survey made by the preparer of this program evaluation, of the total number of students enrolled every semester, there is an average of 20% full-time workers, 10% working part-time and most of them are either unemployed or in an employer’s full-time staff development program.

Average Class Size

Class Size

 

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Total

AC 320

6

8

10

5

6

35

AC 321

6

3

7

7

6

29

AC 325

5

8

9

6

7

35

AC 330

6

9

4

6

10

35

AC 335

5

8

9

6

3

31

AC 370

2

3

7

5

6

23

BU/MS 310

10

7

16

13

18

64

Total

252

Divided by the Number of Classes Offered During the Period

35

Average Class Size

7.2

It should be noted that BU/MS 310 is also a major course requirement for TYC in General Business. Since there is inadequate information available as to the number of TYC in Accounting students actually enrolled in BU/MS 310, then we can just merely use these figures above as the average class size.

Since the ideal class size is 25 students in each class and the average number of students enrolled in each class is 7.2, it is evident that there is more than enough room for each student in class.

In all of five the classes handled by the Program Assessment Coordinator from Fall 2006 to date, all students had many chances to recite, do board work and make presentations. This is one advantage of classes having a small size.

Student Seat Cost

    The college has not yet come up with a specific student seat cost.

    Because of this, a rough estimate of the Average Seat Cost/Student was computed. This is computed by (1) deriving the ratio of the TYC Accounting Core Courses to the total number of classes offered by Business Division for the Academic Year 2010-2011, (2) apportion the total division budget based on the ratio in (1), and then finally, (3) divide the amount in (2) by the total number of students enrolled in all courses. The computation is shown in the table at the next page.

    It must be noted that MS 150, which is offered from Fall to Summer with several sections, was not taken into consideration because it is a major requirement in most programs.

AVERAGE STUDENT SEAT COST Fall 2010-Summer 2011

Business Division Courses

Total Classes for the Year^, with 4-credit Courses as 2 Sections

Ratio to Total Classes for the Academic Year

Proportion to Total Business Division Budget ($238,312.00)*

AC 131

10

13.51%

 

AC 220

6

8.11%

 

AC 250

2

2.70%

 

AC 320

1

1.35%

$3,220.43

AC 321

1

1.35%

$3,220.43

AC 325

1

1.35%

$3,220.43

AC 330

1

1.35%

$3,220.43

AC 335

1

1.35%

$3,220.43

AC 370

1

1.35%

$3,220.43

BU 101

5

6.76%

 

BU 250

2

2.70%

 

BU 260

4

5.41%

 

BU 270

3

4.05%

 

BU 271

2

2.70%

 

BU/MS 110

2

2.70%

 

BU/MS 310

1

1.35%

$3,220.43

CA 105

2

2.70%

 

EC 220

3

4.05%

 

EC 230

3

4.05%

 

EC 320

1

1.35%

 

FIN 312

1

1.35%

 

IS 201

4

5.41%

 

IS 220

2

2.70%

 

IS 230

3

4.05%

 

IS 240

3

4.05%

 

IS 260

2

2.70%

 

IS 270

1

1.35%

 

IS 280

6

8.11%

 

Total Classes

74

 

 

Total Estimated Budget for the Program

$22,543.03

Divided by Program's Student Population in All TYC Accounting Classes

 

 

AC 320

6

AC 321

3

AC 325

7

AC 330

3

AC 335

3

AC 370

2

BU/MS 310

7

Total Program's Student Population

31

AVERAGE SEAT COST

$727.19

*COM-FSM Catalog, IRPO Enrollment Data and FY2011 Performance Budget
^http://www.comfsm.fm/myShark/

Course Completion Rate

AC 320 (Intermediate Accounting I)

  1. Success Rate Trend

 

AC 320

 

 

Year

% of Students Earning C and Higher

% of Students Earning D and Higher

2006*

60.00%

60.00%

2007*

57.14%

100.00%

2008*

10.00%

40.00%

2009^

80.00%

80.00%

2010^

33.33%

100.00%

* IRPO
^ Instructor’s grading sheet

It can be observed from the graph above that there was a significant drop of successful students in 2008, and that the difference between the % of students earning C and higher, and the % of students earning D and higher is 30%.

However, the success rates picked up in 2009 and 2010, although in 2010, most 2/3 of the students enrolled earned D.

 

Quality of Completion Rates

To have a better understanding of the characteristics of the success/failure rates of the students, let us concentrate on the breakdown of final grades for each semester and their respective percentages:

AC 320

Number

Percentage

Fall Term

Fall Term

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Total

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Total

A

0

0

0

0

0

0

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

B

1

0

0

2

0

3

20%

0%

0%

40%

0%

9%

C

2

4

1

2

2

11

40%

57%

10%

40%

33%

33%

D

0

3

3

0

4

10

0%

43%

30%

0%

67%

30%

F

2

0

6

1

0

9

40%

0%

60%

20%

0%

27%

Total

5

7

10

5

6

33

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

 

AC 325

  1. Success Rate Trend

 


AC 325

 

 

Year

% of Students Earning C and Higher

% of Students Earning D and Higher

2006

75.00%

100.00%

2007

77.78%

88.89%

2008

11.11%

55.56%

2009

100.00%

100.00%

2010

57.14%

71.43%

As what can be observed, just like in the previous program review, the significant drop in the success rate happened in 2008. In 2009, there was even a 100% success rate and then, in 2010 was reduced by less than 30%.

The success rate increased in 2010 because students in this class were determined to earn better grades. In 2009, the rate decreased because two students had a hard time balancing class and work pressures.

 

  1. Quality of Completion Rates

 

Looking further into the success rates of students in AC 325, let us focus on the percentages of students by their final grades:

AC 325

Number

Percentage

Fall Term

Fall Term

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Total

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Total

A

0

1

0

1

0

2

0%

11%

0%

17%

0%

6%

B

2

4

0

0

2

8

50%

44%

0%

0%

29%

23%

C

1

2

1

5

2

11

25%

22%

11%

83%

29%

31%

D

1

1

4

0

1

7

25%

11%

44%

0%

14%

20%

F

0

1

4

0

2

7

0%

11%

44%

0%

29%

20%

Total

4

9

9

6

7

35

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

CONCLUSIONS ON OVERALL COMPLETION RATES OF COURSES OFFERED IN FALL:

By getting the average percentages of students earning final grades of A, B, C, D, F and Withdrawn by each semester, and by computing their respective percentages to the total, the table below can be constructed.

Fall Average Completion Rate

Percentage

Fall Term

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Total

A

0%

4%

4%

22%

0%

6%

B

30%

29%

4%

30%

10%

21%

C

35%

46%

20%

41%

43%

37%

D

15%

18%

29%

0%

27%

18%

F

20%

4%

43%

7%

21%

19%

Total

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

 

AC 321

A. Success Rate Trend


AC 321

 

 

Year

% of Students Earning C and Higher

% of Students Earning D and Higher

2006

66.67%

66.67%

2007

66.67%

100.00%

2008

100.00%

100.00%

2009

28.57%

57.14%

2010

83.33%

100.00%

The graph indicated a steady increase in success rates until 2009, and increased again in 2010. Please note that in 2009, the students who were very much challenged in AC 320 of the preceding term were the same ones enrolled in this course for this term.

B.Quality of Completion Rates

Now, let us examine the details of the success rates of students in AC 321 by relating the table below and the graph immediately after it.

AC 321

Number

Percentage

Spring Term

Spring Term

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Total

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Total

A

0

0

0

0

0

0

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

B

3

1

1

1

1

7

50%

33%

14%

14%

17%

24%

C

1

1

6

1

4

13

17%

33%

86%

14%

67%

45%

D

0

1

0

2

1

4

0%

33%

0%

29%

17%

14%

F

2

0

0

3

0

5

33%

0%

0%

43%

0%

17%

Total

6

3

7

7

6

29

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

As what can be seen on the table, the grade with the highest percentage is C (86%). Then, the same thing happened in 2010 (67%).

Then, it is followed by B (24%). In the year 2006, most students got B (50%). Then the following year, 33% of the students got B.

F placed 3rd highest percentage (17%). This is primarily because of the 43% failing rate in 2009, and 33% in 2006.

It is important to note that the average failing rate (17%) for this five-year is even greater than that of those getting D. This is even greater than the one in the previous program review (14%).

AC 330

A. Success Rate Trend


AC 330

 

 

Year

% of Students Earning C and Higher

% of Students Earning D and Higher

2006

80.00%

100.00%

2007

88.89%

100.00%

2008

100.00%

100.00%

2009

33.33%

50.00%

2010

100.00%

100.00%

 

As what can be observed from the graph above, there was a very good success rate during this five-year period.

Except in 2009, there was a 100% success rate. More importantly, there was a 100% of students earning C and higher in 2008 and 2010.

The only snag in this otherwise remarkable success story is that in 2009, only half of the class passed the course. This is the batch of students who had so much difficulty overcoming a great obstacle – inadequate skills and competency in basic accounting courses.

 

B. Quality of Completion Rate

Now, let us take a peek at the quality of completion rates to have a more solid conclusion on the completion rates of this course.

 

AC 330

Number

Percentage

Spring Term

Spring Term

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Total

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Total

A

1

0

0

0

0

1

20%

0%

0%

0%

0%

3%

B

1

3

3

0

7

14

20%

33%

75%

0%

70%

41%

C

2

5

1

2

3

13

40%

56%

25%

33%

30%

38%

D

1

1

0

1

0

3

20%

11%

0%

17%

0%

9%

F

0

0

0

3

0

3

0%

0%

0%

50%

0%

9%

Total

5

9

4

6

10

34

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

As what can be noticed from the table above, most students got a grade of B in 2008 and 2010, with C close behind. In 2006 and 2007, most students got C, with B immediately trailing by.

It was just in 2009 when the failure rate equaled the success rate, with 50% of students earning F, 33% got C and 17% had D.

AC 370

A. Success Rate Trend


AC 370

 

 

Year

% of Students Earning C and Higher

% of Students Earning D and Higher

2006

100.00%

100.00%

2007

100.00%

100.00%

2008

85.71%

85.71%

2009

100.00%

100.00%

2010

100.00%

100.00%

 

This course usually have a 100% success rate, except in 2008, because one student was not able to complete the internship period and he happened to form part 14% of the class.

 

 

 

 

 

B. Quality of Completion Rate

The success rate is better understood by looking at the breakdown of grades and their respective percentages.


AC 370

Number

Percentage

Spring Term

Spring Term

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Total

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Total

A

2

1

2

5

0

10

100%

14%

29%

83%

0%

37%

B

0

2

2

1

5

10

0%

29%

29%

17%

100%

37%

C

0

4

2

0

0

6

0%

57%

29%

0%

0%

22%

D

0

0

0

0

0

0

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

F

0

0

1

0

0

1

0%

0%

14%

0%

0%

4%

Total

2

7

7

6

5

27

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

From the table in the preceding page and the trend graph shown above, there is a high tendency toward the grades A and B.

Some students who enrolled in this course got C (22%). The year 2007 (57%) provided the most number of students with this grade and then, 2008 follows closely behind with a 29% percentage.

It is also worth noting that there was only one student who failed this class.

BU/MS 310

A. Success Rate Trend


BU/MS 310

 

 

Year

% of Students Earning C and Higher

% of Students Earning D and Higher

2006

100.00%

100.00%

2007

100.00%

100.00%

2008

100.00%

100.00%

2009

84.62%

84.62%

2010

100.00%

100.00%

 

Again, there could have been a 100% success rate, with most students earning C or higher. Only that in 2009, the success rate fell down to 84.62%.

B. Quality of Completion Rate

Let us then look closer at the composition of completion rates by analyzing the number and percentages of students’ grade from year to year.

BU/MS 310

Number

Percentage

Spring Term

Spring Term

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Total

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Total

A

6

2

4

4

4

20

67%

29%

29%

31%

22%

33%

B

2

4

7

6

14

33

22%

57%

50%

46%

78%

54%

C

1

1

3

1

0

6

11%

14%

21%

8%

0%

10%

D

0

0

0

0

0

0

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

F

0

0

0

2

0

2

0%

0%

0%

15%

0%

3%

Total

9

7

14

13

18

61

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

As what can be perceived from the table and graph above, the reason the trend was discontinued because two of the students in 2009 failed the class and they happen to be 15% of the class. Of the students who failed, one had a difficulty balancing her work-family-academic life, and the other was a returning student, who needed a lot of catching up for basic concepts she had already forgotten.

CONCLUSIONS ON OVERALL COMPLETION RATES OF COURSES OFFERED IN SPRING:

To further analyze the performance levels of the classes by semester, let us first get the total students from each course with final grades of A, B, C, D, F and Withdrawn, and solve for their respective percentages to the total.

 

Spring Average Completion Rate 

Percentage

Fall Term

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Total

A

47%

11%

14%

29%

6%

21%

B

23%

38%

42%

19%

66%

38%

C

17%

40%

40%

14%

24%

27%

D

5%

11%

0%

11%

4%

6%

F

8%

0%

4%

27%

0%

8%

Total

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

From the table above, it is obvious that most enrollees across the semesters earned a grade of B (38%). This is primarily because of the much highest percentages of the students this grade in 2007 and 2008.

Then, C closely follows with 27%. It cannot be more than the percentage of students getting B, because for most part of the five-year period, its percentage for the year is less than that of B’s percentages
The overall failure rate was only 8%, despite the 27% failing rate in 2009. This is because there were only 8% and 4% failing rate in 2006 and 2008, and 0% in 2007 and 2010.

Student Satisfaction Rate

***Data is not available.

Employment and Transfer Data

***There is no available information.

Program’s Student Learning Outcomes

Graduates of the TYC Accounting should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of Intermediate Accounting by describing the environment and the conceptual framework of financial reporting; analyzing financial statements and accounting for cash and receivables; inventories; property, plant and equipment; intangibles; liabilities; stockholders’ equity; and other special topics on financial reporting,

 

  1. Show an understanding of Cost Accounting concepts relevant to managerial decision-making, planning and control by solving problems involving various costing and budgeting methods; by applying financial, inventory and production management techniques in cost accounting, and by accurately measuring short and long-run organization performance,
  1. Demonstrate familiarity of a wide range of tax concepts with special focus on the taxation of business entities in the United States and the Federated States of Micronesia and a minor emphasis on individual taxation in the two countries,

 

  1. Exhibit competence in analyzing and recording transactions for state, local and the federal government; colleges and universities and other nonprofit organizations; in preparing and interpreting financial statements; and in explaining differences in private and public sector accounting,
  1. Apply knowledge and skills acquired from accounting and other courses by solving real world accounting and general workplace problems in a participating organization in the COM-FSM Internship Program, and

 

  1. Express an appreciation of statistical methods of sampling and estimating population statistics and competence in using computer software to calculate point estimates and confidence intervals and use statistical methods to test hypotheses, recognize trends and make forecasts to support decisions in the business/economics environment.

 

 

Student Learning Outcomes

The highlights of the Course Level Assessments are as follows:

Course

Year

Instructor’s Findings, Recommendations and Comments

AC 320

2009
and
2010

Increase the units of credit to 4 to give students more time to master the concepts through problem solving and to cover ALL the course content topics.

AC 321

2009-11

Increase the units of credit to 4 to give students more time to master the concepts through problem solving and to cover ALL the course content topics.

AC 325

2009

To increase class size/program enrollment, also target nontraditional students by offering modular accounting courses in Pohnpei Campus. After completing all modular accounting courses and required humanities courses, the student can graduate from the TYC Accounting degree.

AC 330

2011

Either reduce the covered topics or increase credits

AC 335

2009

The improvement in the overall class performance of the students were attributable to these factors: (1) providing them chart of accounts, (2) the increase in the standard for admission in the TYC Accounting Program, and (3) the attitudes of the students in helping each other out so they can all pass the course.

AC 370

2009

To reduce absences in the workplace, consider offering this course in summer.

BU/MS 310

2011

Review and reduce Student Learning Outcomes because not all of the 22 SLO's cannot all be measured; they cannot be finished within the term.

The use of a computer laboratory for topics requiring the use of computers is necessary so that the instructor can facilitate and keep the ideal pace.

Make CA 105 a course pre-requisite.

Findings and Recommendations

 

    1. Program Admission Requirements

       

      Existing

      Recommendations

      Justification

      1. Graduate of any AS Degree

      None Recommended

       

      1. Minimum GPA of 2.50

      None Recommended

       

      1. Minimum Grade of C in Business Administration and AS Core Courses,

       

      Repeated any or all of these accounting courses only twice with a minimum grade of B on the last try.

      To better apply this policy,

      1. Advisors shall look in both the DEGREE COMPLETION AND ONLINE TRANSCRIPT of their advisees.
      2. The programmer shall install in the SIS this system requirement and a user warning to warn OARR personnel and advisors of any student who cannot qualify in the program, and
      3. In special cases, only the administrator password can override this system requirement.

      This revision is primarily because of the tragedy that happened in Fall 2008, where a sizable percentage of students enrolled in the program for this term needed more skills in and mastery of 100 and 200 level accounting courses to prepare them for 300 level accounting courses.

      Some of these students managed to get admitted into the program even when they repeatedly took accounting courses and earn a grade of C and D, after failing the course on the first try and the nth attempt.

      The system requirement is for strict compliance with this policy, so that no student can take advantage of the SIS system’s weaknesses and limitations

       

      1. Admitted by the COM-FSM Admissions Board

      None Recommended

       

    2.Program Degree Requirements

      -

      EXISTING

      RECOMMENDATIONS

      JUSTIFICATIONS

      Course No.

      Course Title

      Unit Credits

      Prerequisites

      Course No.

      Course Title.

      Unit Credits

      Prerequisites

      Remarks

      AC 320

      Intermediate Accounting I

      3

      Accounting II and Managerial Accounting

      AC 320

      Intermediate Accounting I

      4

      Managerial Accounting

       

      Accounting II is one of the pre-requisite courses of Cost Accounting.

      To better train students, they need to have more time to solve and be exposed to as much types of problems, as much as possible.

      Although most students earned B and C, but then, they might still need a lot of catching up to do in higher level accounting courses, let alone obtain a professional license in foreign countries.

      AC 321

      Intermediate Accounting II

      3

      Intermediate Accounting I

      AC 321

      Intermediate Accounting II

      4

      Intermediate Accounting I

       

      For the same reason cited in the case of Intermediate Accounting I, it is important to build on the basic knowledge that students acquired in much more basic accounting courses and the more complex details of accounting for intangible assets, investments, liabilities, owner's equity and other special topics.

      This course shall have four units of credit so that the students will have enough time to sharpen their problem-solving skills (laboratory), with the guidance of their instructor.

      AC 325

      Cost Accounting

      3

       

      AC 322

      Managerial Accounting

      4

       

       

      There is a need to rename the Course Title because Managerial Accounting involves quantitative aspects of discharging managerial functions, which are discussed in this course.

      This change in the number of units is important because there is a need for the students to gain mastery in the course and enough time to sharpen their skills in problem solving through laboratory sessions.

      AC 330

      Taxation

      3

       

       

       

       

       

      None recommended.

       

      AC 335

      Government Accounting

      3

       

       

       

       

       

      None recommended.

       

      AC 370

      Accounting Internship

      3

       

       

       

       

       

      None recommended.

       

      BU/MS 310

      Applied Statistics

      3

       

       

       

       

       

      Make CA 105 a prerequisite course.

      Students have difficulties applying spreadsheet application. 

       

      Any Q & LR/WC & Humanities Course

      3

       

      AC 340

      Constructive Accounting

      3

      AC 250

       

      Constructive Accounting or otherwise known as forensic accounting will enable Third Year Students sharpen their knowledge in the nature and behavior of various accounts and hone their skills in reconstructing accounts.

      This course will prepare them in correction of errors and auditing, when a bachelor's degree in accounting will be offered sometime in the future.

       

      Any Q & LR/WC & Humanities Course

      3

       

      CA 105

      Data Analysis Using Spreadsheets

      3

       

       

      This course will come in handy for FIN 312, and BU/MS 310 topics

       

      Any Q & LR/WC & Humanities Course

      3

       

      FIN 312

      Corporate Finance

       

       

       

      This course is as useful to General Business Majors as to Accounting Majors because a lot of important quantitative corporate decision-making tools, which are important to future audit/management consultants, are taken here.

    3.Program Outcomes 
    -

    Findings

    Recommendations

    Justification

          1. The Average Class Size is 7.20. This is less than the required minimum of 10 students per class.

     

          1. The Average Seat Cost is $727.12

    Since there is a unconfirmed proposal to totally scrap the program, and that students openly voice out their concerns on the difficulty of successfully graduating from the program,

    1. If this purported proposal is not yet decided upon, an intense advertisement, to the college and the community at large, can be made to diminish the adverse effect of this bad publicity.

     

    1. Conduct official surveys to potential program enrollees.
    1. Offer modular trainings in TYC Accounting courses, and once a student completed everything, he/she will be able to earn the degree.

    1. Be open to offer a Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting, even without having a tie-up with a neighboring university for as long as the required courses for graduation are the same.
    1. Bad publicity will always have an adverse effect on any business organization, especially for an educational institution. The college administration has to address this matter soon.

     

    1. The purpose of this is to gain an awareness of the potential students’ preferences on how to finish the program.
    1. This will enable full-time students, part-time student-workers, and people working eight hours/day to attend classes. Since students have to focus on one course at a time, they would have better chances of completing the course.

    1. This could be a factor why smart students, who have interest in accounting, have reservations on pursuing TYC Accounting in the college, because they cannot earn their bachelors’ degree here.
    1. Relatively low success rates in:

    AC 320
    AC 321
    AC 325

    1. Increase the units of credit from 3 to 4.

     

     

    1. To also address this problem, do recommendations 2 and 3 on the previous page.

    This is to further enable students to sharpen their problem-solving skills,

     

    These recommendations are for the same reasons stated in the previous page.

    1. Low graduation rates

     

    1. Perform recommendations 2, 3 and 4.

     

    For the same reason stated in the previous page, and to enable students to earn their degree whenever work-family life would permit.

    1. No Institutionalized Seat Cost Computation
    1. The college should come up with an official computation of the seat cost.

    This is to have a uniform seat cost computation.

    4. Students Satisfaction Rate
    -

    Findings

    Recommendations

    Justification

    There are no data on student satisfaction rate that are readily available

    The VPIA shall designate people who shall determine measures of and gather information on student satisfaction.
    a. This study shall be conducted by personnel who have a background as an educator in the field of business and accounting, and
    b. This study shall be carried out by personnel, whose objectivity to the case may not be questioned. He/she shall be anyone who does not form part of business division faculty nor of the curriculum committee, which is tasked at approving the courses of each program.

    Then, the IRPO shall request reports on student satisfaction from the Office of the VPIA and upload the same on the net so that this data may be used for planning and decision-making at the end of every term.

    It is very important that the objectivity of the person conducting the survey on student satisfaction so that there will be less questions as to the reliability and validity of the results.

    5.Employment Data
    -

    Findings

    Recommendations

    Justification

    There is no data available on employment of graduates.

    The Alumni Office shall be strengthened so that it can keep track of alumni updates from them on a yearly basis. This office shall also analyze the data and provide this information to the IRPO every year.

    The IRPO shall ensure that this data shall be available to interested users at any time through the net.

    This data is very important so that the college will be able to monitor the employability of its graduates, it can provide employment support and facilitate better networking among CCM/COM graduates.

    6. Employer Satisfaction Rate
    -

    Findings

    Recommendations

    Justification

    Data on employer satisfaction rate is not available.

    The college shall also yearly check with the government and the private sector the latter’s current employment needs in their respective accounting divisions so that there shall be other means of reassessing this program.

    The Office of the VPIA, in close collaboration with the Business Division Chair, shall designate personnel to handle this task.

    This person shall periodically report the same to the VPIA, who shall furnish the same to Business Division Chair for appropriate action.

    This same report shall also be furnished to the IRPO so that it may be available to certain internet users.

    There is a need for the college to annually gather information on employer satisfaction of fresh graduates of this program so that it will have a more solid basis on assessing the quality of graduates and their ability to meet the skills and knowledge requirements of the employers on the job.

    7. Transfer Rate
    -

    Findings

    Recommendations

    Justification

    Transfer rate data is also not available to date.

    The Alumni Office, along with the Office of the Admissions and Records, shall be given a boost in order that data on student transfer shall be provided to the IRPO every semester.

    Data required shall include reasons for transfer and other information related to transfer from the college.

    The IRPO shall take charge of distributing this data to interested users at any time.

    This information is very much needed because dissatisfaction as to the quality of education provided by the college may not be available from student satisfaction survey.

    This is also needed to keep track of students who transfer to other institutions of higher learning abroad and those who transfer to universities in other nations while without finishing their degree in COM.

    8. Program Review
    -

    Findings

    Recommendations

    Justification

    It is just recently that this Program is evaluated to comply with the requirements of the WASC Accreditation Committee.

    The Program shall be reviewed once every two years

    A periodic review is necessary to make sure that this Program can meet the current job market demand and satisfy transfer requirements for institutions to which graduates regularly transfer.

    This is also necessary so that it can be updated with the new trends in business and accounting.

    In addition, a periodic review is necessary because it will enable the working committee on any proposed changes in the curriculum make appropriate suggestions to accommodate offering a bachelor’s degree program in accounting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unit Assessment Report

Report Period: 2013-2014

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