SC 180 Introduction to Microbiology

Course Description:
This is a one semester course and laboratory studies concerning microbes: bacteria, fungi, protists, animals and viruses with an emphasis on bacterial morphology, anatomy, staining, classification, metabolism, growth and the effects of physical and chemical agents on bacteria. The course includes study of microorganisms affecting humans, principles of disease transmission, disease prevention, immunity and biotechnology.

  • Prerequisite Courses: SC 120 or MR 120 with a grade of “C” or better.

A. PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES (PLOS):
The student will be able to:

  1. Describe the structure, function, and basic pathologies of the human body.
  2. Demonstrate a solid foundation in basic biological sciences.
  3. Describe health career and allied professions and gain experience working effectively in groups with health professionals to address human life sciences and health problems.
  4. Discuss, analyze, and interpret fundamental and current issues relevant to human life sciences and health problems, and communicate information in a critical, scientific, and technologically advanced manner

B. STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (SLOS) - GENERAL
The student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of the basic concepts of microbiology
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of the basic concepts of the organic and inorganic chemistry.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of bacterial morphology, nutrition, metabolism, genetics, cultivation, and control.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of viral, fungal, protozoan, and metazoan structure and metabolism.
  5. Demonstrate knowledge of pathogenesis of infectious diseases produced by microorganisms and explain the host defense mechanisms.

SLO

PLO 1

PLO 2

PLO 3

PLO 4

1

ID

ID

I

I

2

I

ID

I

I

3

IDM

IDM

I

I

4

IDM

IDM

ID

ID

5

IDM

IDM

ID

ID

I = Introduced
D = Demonstrated
M = Mastered

C. STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (SLOS) – SPECIFIC
The student will be able to:

General SLO 1: . Demonstrate knowledge of the basic concepts of microbiology

Student Learning Outcomes

Assessment strategies

1.1 Explain the spontaneous generation theory and the experiments of Louis Pasteur and Robert Koch, explain the germ theory in production of infectious diseases, and define bacteriology, mycology, protozoology, and virology.

Quiz and/or examination. Laboratory exercise

1.2 The student will be able to define the structure of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, general structure of viruses, bacteria, protista, fungi (yeasts and molds), explain the 3 and 5 kingdom systems.

Quiz and/or examination. Laboratory exercise

1.3 The student will be able to explain bacterial taxonomy, types of microscopes used in microbiology, and classification of stains used in microbiology

Quiz and/or examination. Laboratory exercise

General SLO 2: Demonstrate knowledge of the basic concepts of the organic and inorganic chemistry.


Student Learning Outcomes

Assessment strategies

2.1 Define elements, atoms, atomic structure, atomic number, mass, and weight, isotopes, electron shells, compounds, molecules, chemical bonds; water, solvents, and solutions, acids and bases, the pH scale, buffers, functional groups in organic chemistry, structure and function of proteins , fats, sugars, and nucleic acids.

Quiz and/or examination. Laboratory Exercise

General SLO 3: Demonstrate knowledge of bacterial morphology, nutrition, metabolism, genetics, cultivation, and control.


Student Learning Outcomes

Assessment strategies

3.1 Explain classification of bacteria based on shape and arrangement, the structure of bacterial cell wall and cell membrane, structure and function of the cytoplasm, ribosomes, inclusion bodies, nucleoid, plasmids, flagella, pili, capsules and explain the differences between Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria, exo and endotoxins.

Quiz and/or examination. Laboratory Exercise

3.2 Explain the phases of bacterial growth, growth requirements (temperature, nutrients , oxygen, carbon dioxide, etc) and classification of bacteria based on temperature and oxygen requirements.

Quiz and/or examination. Laboratory Exercise

3.3 Explain the classification of bacteriologic media and how bacteria are grown and counted in microbiology

Quiz and/or examination. Laboratory Exercise

3.4 Describe bacterial metabolism and metabolic pathways, structure of DNA, importance of plasmids, DNA replication, protein synthesis and regulation, the operon theory, bacterial mutations, bacterial recombination, transduction, and conjugation mechanisms, and explain how the principles of genetic engineering apply to environmental biology, agriculture, vaccine production, pharmaceuticals, and medical practice.

Quiz and/or examination. Laboratory Exercise

3.5 Explain the classification of antibacterial agents based on the mechanism of action, give examples of antimicrobials from each class, describe current medical problems related to antibacterial use and explain the classification of antifungal and antiviral drugs.

Quiz and/or examination. Laboratory Exercise

General SLO 4: Demonstrate knowledge of viral, fungal, protozoan, and metazoan structure and metabolism.


Student Learning Outcomes

Assessment strategies

4.1 Describe the viral structure, replication and classification of viruses, diagnosis of viral diseases, antiviral drugs, and give examples of pneumotropic, dermotropic, viscerotropic, and neurotropic viral diseases and explain how these diseases are produced, diagnosed, and treated.

Quiz and/or examination. Laboratory Exercise

General SLO 5. Demonstrate knowledge of pathogenesis of infectious diseases produced by microorganisms and explain the host defense mechanisms.


Student Learning Outcomes

Assessment strategies

5.1 Describe the normal flora, the host-parasite interaction, the stages of infectious diseases, transmission of infectious diseases (direct, indirect, and vectors), define reservoirs and carriers and explain what the virulence factors in production of diseases are.

Quiz and/or examination. Laboratory Exercise

5.2 Describe the human blood components, structure and function of the human lymphatic system, nonspecific and specific resistance mechanisms, antibody structure and types, the complement system and explain classification of vaccines, give examples of vaccine types, explain the vaccination schedule and describe serology and serologic tests used in microbiology

Quiz and/or examination. Laboratory Exercise

5.3 Describe bacterial, viral, fungal, and protozoan air-, water-, food-, blood-, soil-, and arthropod-borne diseases, STDs and explain how these diseases are diagnosed and treated.

Quiz and/or examination. Laboratory Exercise

D. COURSE CONTENT

  1. Introduction to Microbiology
  2. Organic chemistry
  3. Taxonomy
  4. Bacterial structure and growth.
  5. Bacterial Metabolism
  6. Bacterial genetics.
  7. Bacterial diseases
  8. Viruses –structure, classification, and replication
  9. Viral diseases (pneumo, dermato, viscero and neurotropic diseases)
  10. Fungi- classification, structure, and fungal diseases.
  11. Protozoa-classification, structure, and diseases
  12. Multicellular parasites (flat and round worms)-diseases
  13. Resistance to diseases, the immune system, and immune disorders.
  14. Physical and chemical control of microorganisms.
  15. Chemotherapeutic agents and Antibiotics.
  16. Microbiology of food.
  17. Environmental Microbiology.
E. METHODS OF INSTRUCTION

Lectures, audio-visuals (including videos/DVDs), laboratory exercises, and observations./p>

F. REQUIRED TEXT AND COURSE MATERIALS

Jeffrey C. Pommerville, Alcamo’s Fundamentals of Microbiology (2010), 9th (or latest) edition, published by Jones & Bartlett Learning


G. REFERENCE MATERIALS
Kathleen Park Talaro, Foundations in Microbiology: Basic Principles ( 2011), 8th edition, published by McGraw-Hill Publications (or most recent edition).
Gerard Tortora, Berdell R. Funke, and Christine Gerard J. Tortora, Berdell R. Funke and Christine L Case, Microbiology, An Introduction (2010), 10th edition ) published by Benjamin Cummins Publications (or most recent edition).

H. INSTRUCTIONAL COST
None

I. EVALUATION
None

J. CREDIT BY EXAMINATION
None

 

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