PH 212-Surveillance, Identification and Management of an Outbreak

GENERAL INFORMATION:

Course title: PH 212: Surveillance, Identification, and Management of an Outbreak

Campus: National Campus

Initiator: Paul Dacanay

Date: March 2021

Course description:
This course begins with a review of public health surveillance systems (PHSSs), their components and functions. Emphasis is placed on the fundamental role of a PHSS in detecting possible disease outbreaks. Students will learn the basic concepts and principles of outbreak identification and management. Basic principles on evaluation and possible solutions for improvement of public health surveillance systems, particularly those of the Pacific, are also discussed.

COURSE HOURS/CREDITS:

   

Hours per Week

 

No. of Weeks

 

Total Hours

 

Semester Credits

Lecture

 

3

x

16

x

48/16

=

3

Laboratory

   

x

 

x

/48

=

 

Workshop

   

x

 

x

/48

=

 

Co-op

   

x

 

x

/32

=

 
       

Total Semester Credits

3

PURPOSE OF COURSE:

[X] Degree requirement

[ ] Degree elective

[ ] Certificate

[ ] Other

PREREQUISITES: NU 125; Co-requisites: NU134,135

PSLO#

Program

   

PSLOS OF OTHER PROGRAMS THIS COURSE MEETS:

CC Chair signature:____________Date recommended:__________
VPIA signature:____________Date approved:___________

1) INSTITUTIONAL STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (Check all that apply and are linked to the course student learning outcomes.)

[x]

1. Effective oral communication: capacity to deliver prepared, purposeful presentations designed to increase knowledge, to foster understanding, or to promote change in the listeners’ attitudes, values, beliefs, or behaviors.

[ ]

2. Effective written communication: development and expression of ideas in writing through work in many genres and styles, utilizing different writing technologies, and mixing texts, data, and images through iterative experiences across the curriculum.

[X]

3. Critical thinking: a habit of mind characterized by the comprehensive exploration of issues, ideas, artifacts, and events before accepting or formulating an opinion or conclusion.

[ ]

4. Problem solving: capacity to design, evaluate, and implement a strategy to answer an open-ended question or achieve a desired goal.

[ ]

5. Intercultural knowledge and competence: a set of cognitive, affective, and behavioral skills and characteristics that support effective and appropriate interaction in a variety of cultural contexts.

[ ]

6. Information literacy: the ability to know when there is a need for information, to be able to identify, locate, evaluate, and effectively and responsibly use and share that information for the problem at hand.

[x]

7. Foundations and skills for life-long learning : purposeful learning activity, undertaken on an ongoing basis with the aim of improving knowledge, skills, and competence.

[ ]

8. Quantitative Reasoning: ability to reason and solve quantitative problems from a wide array of authentic contexts and everyday life situations; comprehends and can create sophisticated arguments supported by quantitative evidence and can clearly communicate those arguments in a variety of formats.

PROGRAM STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (PSLOs): The student will be able to:

  1. Recognize, describe and discuss the basic public health science facts and principles;
  2. List and discuss the essential public health functions and their interrelationships at community and district level;
  3. Describe and discuss adult, children and family health issues;
  4. Discuss and demonstrate an understanding and practice of some generic public health competencies;
  5. Demonstrate proper public health skills for public health practice in the community as a state or local public health officer;
  6. Discuss and demonstrate community and cultural sensitivity in the health care environment;
  7. Describe and discuss the health determinants and problems of adults, children and families;
  8. Demonstrate proper cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and first aid techniques;
  9. Demonstrate the ability and discuss how to make a community diagnosis based on the determinants of health;
  10. Identify and demonstrate good public health practice;
  11. Have had work experience at a public health facility at community and district levels.

COURSE STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (CSLOs) (General): The student will be to:

  1. Understand how Public Health Surveillance (PHS) works, including the basic surveillance wheel
  2. Get familiar with current PHSS operated in Micronesia and in the Pacific
  3. Be conversant with the basic steps in the management of an outbreak of a communicable disease and apply these steps to a practical situation
  4. Know some of the possible modes of intervention to prevent the spread of disease outbreaks and how they vary with the natural history of diseases
  5. Understand the relationship between a PHSS and the detection of disease outbreaks

4. COURSE STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (CSLOs) (Specific): The student will be to:

CSLO (General) 1:Understand how Public Health Surveillance [PHS] works, including the basic surveillance wheel

Student Learning Outcome (specific)

ISLO

PSLO

Assessment Strategies

1.1 1.1 Explain the use of epidemiology in PHS and its interaction with PHS

3

1, 4, 9

Practical demonstration to be graded according to a recommended rubric Direct and multiple choice questions as part of examinations and quizzes given during the semester

1.2 Described the applications of epidemiology, using pacific-based examples

3

1, 4, 9

Practical demonstration to be graded according to a recommended rubric
Direct and multiple choice questions as part of examinations and quizzes given during the semester

1.3 Explain, with examples, the basic epidemiological measure

3, 7

1, 4, 9

Practical demonstration to be graded according to a specified rubric
Direct and multiple choice questions as part of examinations and quizzes given during the semester

1.4 Describe the surveillance wheel; sequential components, mechanism of work, sectors involved, their functions, and responsibilities

3, 7

1, 4, 9

Practical demonstration to be graded according to a specified rubric
Direct and multiple choice questions as part of examinations and quizzes given during the semester

CSLO (General) 2: Get familiar with current Public Health Surveillance System [PHSS] operated in Micronesia and in the Pacific

Student Learning Outcomes (specific)

ISLO

PSLO

Assessment Strategies

2.1 Describe how the PHSS in Micronesia and the Pacific operate

3

1, 4, 9

Case Scenario discussions assessed with a rubric
Direct and multiple-choice questions as part of examinations and quizzes given during the semester

2.2 List the obligations undertaken by public health services in Micronesia, as per the Law on Public Health, Safety, and Welfare

1, 3, 7

1, 4, 9

Individual oral presentation in response to direct questions
Direct and multiple choice questions as part of examinations and quizzes given during the semester

2.3 Describe some of the data collection systems in common usage, such as Notifiable Diseases [ND] and Consolidated Monthly Returns [CMR].

3, 7,

1, 4, 7, 9

Case Scenario discussions assessed with a rubric
Simulation work group graded by peer assessment rubric

2.4 Discuss, analyze, and evaluate the components of a PHSS; suggest possible solutions for improvements

3, 7,

1, 4, 9

Case Scenario discussions assessed with a rubric
Simulation work group graded by peer assessment rubric
Direct and multiple choice questions as part of examinations and quizzes given during the semester

2.5 Perform the basic steps in the evaluation of a PHSS performance

3, 4, 7

1, 4, 9

Case Scenario discussions assessed with a rubric
Simulation work group graded by peer assessment rubric Direct and multiple-choice questions as part of examinations and quizzes given during the semester

CSLO (General) 3: : Demonstrate the basic steps in the management of an outbreak of a communicable disease and apply these steps to a practical situation

Student Learning Outcomes (specific)

ISLO

PSLO

Assessment Strategies

3.1 Describe some milestone events in the history of outbreak investigation

 

1, 3

1, 4, 9

Individual oral presentation in response to direct questions assessed by a rubric
Direct and multiple-choice questions as part of examinations and quizzes given during the semester

3.2 List and explain the nomenclature of outbreak investigation

1, 7

1, 4, 9

Individual oral presentation in response to direct questions assessed by a rubric
Direct and multiple choice questions as part of examinations and quizzes given during the semester

3.3 Identify and discuss different channels through which a disease outbreak is recognized

 

3

1, 4, 9

Case Scenario discussions assessed with a rubric
Direct questions as part of examinations and quizzes given during the semester

3.4 State the purposes of outbreak investigation

1, 7

1, 4, 9

Individual oral presentation in response to direct questions assessed by a rubric
Direct and multiple choice questions as part of examinations and quizzes given during the semester

3.5 List and explain the steps in a classical outbreak investigation

 

3, 7

1, 4, 9

Simulation work group graded by peer assessment rubric
Direct and multiple-choice questions as part of examinations and quizzes given during the semester

3.6 Explain how epidemiological concepts and skills are employed in each step

3, 4

1, 4, 9

Individual oral presentation in response to direct questions assessed by a rubric
Direct and multiple choice questions as part of examinations and quizzes given during the semester

3.7 Explain what a case definition is; the classification of case definition

 

1, 3, 7

1, 4, 9

Individual oral presentation in response to direct questions assessed by a rubric
Direct and multiple-choice questions as part of examinations and quizzes given during the semester

3.8 Demonstrate how descriptive epidemiology is applied in outbreak investigation, i.e. the use of the line listings, epidemic curves, spot maps, etc.

3, 7

1, 4, 9

Case Scenario discussions assessed with a rubric
Simulation work group graded by peer assessment rubric
Direct and multiple choice questions as part of examinations and quizzes given during the semester

3.9 Construct epidemic curves; explain their different trends according to disease natural history and mode of transmission

 

7

1, 4, 9

Case Scenario discussions assessed with a rubric
Simulation work group graded by peer assessment rubric
Direct and multiple-choice questions as part of examinations and quizzes given during the semester

3.10 Demonstrate how analytic epidemiology is applied in outbreak investigation

7

1, 4, 9

Case Scenario discussions assessed with a rubric
Simulation work group graded by peer assessment rubric
Direct and multiple-choice questions as part of examinations and quizzes given during the semester

3.11 Explain, calculate, and interpret odds ratio [OD] and attack rate [AR]

 

3, 4, 7

1, 4, 9

Case Scenario discussions assessed with a rubric
Simulation work group graded by peer assessment rubric
Direct and multiple-choice questions as part of examinations and quizzes given during the semester

3.12 Discuss the importance of disseminating the investigation findings

3

1, 4, 9

Case Scenario discussions assessed with a rubric
Simulation work group graded by peer assessment rubric
Direct and multiple-choice questions as part of examinations and quizzes given during the semester

CSLO (General) 4: Know some of the possible modes of intervention to prevent the spread of disease outbreaks and how they vary with the natural history of disease

Student Learning Outcomes (specific)

ISLO

PSLO

Assessment Strategies

4.1 Describe the basic principles and strategies to control the occurrence and transmission of communicable disease

1, 3, 7

1, 4, 9

Individual oral presentation in response to direct questions assessed by a rubric
Direct and multiple choice questions as part of examinations and quizzes given during the semester

4.2 Describe and explain the chain of infection as the interaction between agent-host-environment

1, 7

1, 4, 9

Individual oral presentation in response to direct questions assessed by a rubric
Direct and multiple choice questions as part of examinations and quizzes given during the semester

4.3 Discuss the field epidemiology triangle: person-place-time

3, 7

1, 4, 9

Individual oral presentation in response to direct questions assessed by a rubric
Direct and multiple choice questions as part of examinations and quizzes given during the semester
Practice sets graded based on an answer key

4.4 Evaluate the efficacy of the implemented control measures

3

1, 4, 9

Practice sets graded based on an answer key
Simulation work group graded by peer assessment rubric
Direct and multiple choice questions as part of examinations and quizzes given during the semester

4.5 Discuss the prominent problems of approached to non-communicable disease control

1, 7

1, 4, 9

Individual oral presentation in response to direct questions assessed by a rubric
Direct and multiple choice questions as part of examinations and quizzes given during the semester

CSLO (General) 5: Understand the relationship between a PHSS and the detection of disease outbreaks

5.1 Demonstrate some common diseases under surveillance in Micronesia and the Pacific

3

1, 4, 9

Case Scenario discussions assessed with a rubric
Simulation work group graded by peer assessment rubric
Direct and multiple choice questions as part of examinations and quizzes given during the semester

5.2 Present and discuss the current surveillance and the most recent outbreak investigation of some of the following diseases as applicable:
Dengue Fever
Tuberculosis
Sexually Transmitted Infections
Filariasis

1, 3

1, 4, 9

Case Scenario discussions assessed with a rubric
Simulation work group graded by peer assessment rubric
Direct and multiple choice questions as part of examinations and quizzes given during the semester

5.3 Perform three standard exercises on outbreak investigations, selected from: Measles, Hemorrhagic fever, and bladder cancer in chemical workers, dysentery in pilgrims and other, as relevant

3*, 7

1, 4, 9

Case Scenario discussions assessed with a rubric
Simulation work group graded by peer assessment rubric
Direct and multiple choice questions as part of examinations and quizzes given during the semester

5) COURSE CONTENT:

  1. Review of basic epidemiological concepts
  2. Public Health Surveillance Systems (PHSS)
  3. PHSS and The Law on Public Health, Safety and Welfare – Data Collection
  4. Evaluation and improvement of PHSS performance
  5. Outbreak investigation
  6. Control of outbreaks
  7. The relationship between PHSS and the detection of disease outbreaks

6) METHOD(S) OF INSTRUCTION:

[X] Lecture [X] Cooperative learning groups

[ ] Laboratory [X] In-class exercises

[ ] Audio visual [X] Demonstrations

[ ] Other

7) REQUIRED TEXT(S) AND COURSE MATERIALS:

Gregg MB. (2008). Field epidemiology (3rd Ed.). London, England: Oxford University Press. (or most recent edition)

8) REFERENCE MATERIALS:

Ed Souares Y. (1998). Public health surveillance in the pacific. Noumea: SPC. (or most recent edition).

Arias KM. (2000). Quick reference to outbreak investigation and control in health care facilities (1st Ed.). Burlington, Massachusetts: Jones and Bartlett. (Or most recent edition).

Beaglehole R., Bonita R., Kjellstrom T. (2007). Basic epidemiology (2nd Ed.). Geneva, Switzeland: World Health Organization. (or most recent edition).

Donaldson RJ., Donaldson LJ. (1993). Essential public health medicine. Newbury, England: Petroc Press. (or most recent edition).

Handouts data on disease outbreaks; FSM Law on Public Health, Safety and Welfare; ND and CMR report form.

9) INSTRUCTIONAL COSTS:

None.

10) EVALUATION:

Students must have a grade of 70%[C] or better to pass this course.

11) CREDIT BY EXAMINATION:

None.

PH 212 Endorsed by CC: 02/28/22
 

Approved by VPIA: 02/28/22

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