MR-120 Marine Biology with Lab

Course Description: The course introduces students to the common forms of life inhabiting the oceans of the globe including the marine microbes, plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates. Their basic structure, function, natural history and adaptations to the marine environment will be covered. Current issues in marine biology will also be discussed. Laboratory sessions and field exercises will focus mostly on the taxonomic groups.

  • This course also meets PLO #(s) 3.1 and 3.2 of the GEN ED program.
  • Prerequisite Courses: ESL 089.

A.  PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES (PLOs): 
The student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate fundamental knowledge of geological, geographical, physical, chemical, astrological, and biological oceanography.
  2. Apply fundamental knowledge of marine sciences towards identifying and solving regional and global problems relating to marine systems.
  3. Apply the scientific process to formulate hypotheses, design experiments, and collect and analyze data from which valid scientific conclusions are drawn.
  4. Communicate effectively, in written and oral forms, utilizing the language and concepts of marine science.

B.  STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (SLOs) - GENERAL: 
The student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the scientific method and an enhanced capacity to observe, classify, make predictions, formulate hypotheses, analyze data, and derive conclusions.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of basic biochemical molecules.
  3. Describe cellular structures and their functions.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of the basic principles of energy, cellular respiration, and photosynthesis.
  5. Explain, and identify the forms of cell division.
  6. Explain the basic principles of Mendelian and molecular genetics.
  7. Demonstrate knowledge of the diversity of marine life.
  8. Form connections between human activities and the affects on marine life.

SLO

PLO 1

PLO 2

PLO 3

PLO 4

1

 

 

ID

ID

2

ID

 

I

 

3

ID

 

I

I

4

ID

 

 

I

5

I

 

I

 

6

ID

 

I

ID

7

ID

 

I

ID

8

 

I

I

 

I = Introduced
D = Demonstrated
M = Mastered

C.  STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (SLOs) - SPECIFIC: 
The student will be able to:

General SLO 1. Demonstrate an understanding of the scientific method and an enhanced capacity to observe, classify, make predictions, formulate hypotheses, analyze data, and derive conclusions.


Student Learning Outcomes

Assessment Strategies

1.1 Define and describe the general steps in the scientific method, differentiate inductive and deductive reasoning, explain how hypotheses are formed, identify variables, and elaborate upon the reasons why, and the ways in which, a scientist conducts controlled experiments.

Quiz and examination.

1.2 Demonstrate knowledge of the scientific method by conducting at least one laboratory experiment, collecting and analyzing data, and presenting experimental results in a formal laboratory report.

Laboratory report will be scored using a rubric for demonstration level.

General SLO 2. Demonstrate knowledge of basic biochemical molecules


Student Learning Outcomes

Assessment Strategies

2.1Illustrate basic atomic structure, describe subatomic particles, relate the atom’s structure to its chemical properties, describe electron orbital configuration and how it affects the reactivity of an element, and describe three types of chemical bonds and how each is formed.

Homework and/or Quiz, and examination.

2.2 Describe the mechanism of enzymes as catalysts in chemical reactions.

Quiz, examination, and optional laboratory exercise.

2.2 List the four major groups of biological molecules and describe their functions.

Quiz and/or examination.

General SLO 3. Describe cellular structures and their functions.


Student Learning Outcomes

Assessment Strategies

3.1 Differentiate between prokaryotic cells, eukaryotic cells, and viruses.

Quiz and/or examination and laboratory exercises.

3.2 Describe the function of a cell wall, plasma membrane, and cytoskeleton. 

Quiz and/or examination.

3.3 Name and explain the functions of structures in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells.

Quiz and/or examination.

3.4 Identify prokaryotic cells, plant cells, animal cells, and major cellular components.

Demonstrate in laboratory exercises.

General SLO 4. Demonstrate knowledge of the basic principles of energy, cellular respiration, and photosynthesis.


Student Learning Outcomes

Assessment Strategies

4.1 Define energy, explain the role of ATP as an energy coupler, and compare aerobic and anaerobic respiration.

Quiz and/or examination.

4.2 Outline the generalized formula for cellular respiration, and illustrate the structure and explain the function of mitochondria.

Quiz and/or examination.

4.3 Outline the generalized formula for photosynthesis, illustrate the structure and explain the function of a chloroplast.

Quiz and/or examination

General SLO 5. Explain, and identify the forms of cell division


Student Learning Outcomes

Assessment Strategies

5.1 Describe and diagram binary fission.

Quiz and/or examination.  Laboratory exploration/reporting.

5.2 List the stages of, and identify the stages of, the cell cycle, describe the phases and events of mitosis and meiosis, differentiate between karyokinesis and cytokinesis, and distinguish between asexual and sexual reproduction.

Quiz and/or examination.  Laboratory exploration/reporting.

General SLO 6. Explain the basic principles of Mendelian and molecular genetics


Student Learning Outcomes

Assessment Strategies

6.1 Explain the Mendelian principles of heredity, connect the steps of meiosis to Mendelian principles of inheritance, describe inheritance patterns including dominance, incomplete dominance, and codominance.

Quiz and/or examination.  Laboratory exercises including Punnet squares.

6.2 Describe the basic events of DNA replication and understand the use of RNA to generate proteins.

Quiz and/or examination.

General SLO 7. Demonstrate knowledge of the diversity of marine life.


Student Learning Outcomes

Assessment Strategies

7.1 Define organic evolution, explain the evolution of life according to Darwin, and define speciation.

Quiz and/or examination.

7.2 Identify the major physical conditions that influence living creatures.

Quiz and/or examination.

7.3 List, describe the characteristics of, and classify marine organisms by domain, kingdom, phylum/division, and class.

Quiz and/or examination.  Laboratory explorations/reports.

7.4 Differentiate between taxonomy, phylogeny, and systematics.

Quiz and/or examination.

7.5 Describe the morphology, function, niche, and adaptation of marine organisms.

Quiz and/or examination
Laboratory explorations/reports.

General SLO 8. Form connections between human activities and the affects on marine life.


Student Learning Outcomes

Assessment Strategies

8.1 Identify a few examples of, and explain, the human impact on marine life and marine resources.

Quiz and/or examination.
Laboratory exercise and/or project.

D.  COURSE CONTENT
1.  Scientific method
2.  Biochemistry
3.  Cell structure and function
4.  Energy
5.  Cell division and reproduction
6.  Genetics
7.  Evolution
8.  Taxonomy & classification
9.  Diversity of marine life
10.  Human impacts on marine life

E.  METHODS OF INSTRUCTION
Lectures, audio-visuals (including videos/DVDs), laboratory exercises, field trips, and observations.

F.  REQUIRED TEXT(S) AND COURSE MATERIALS
Castro, P. & Huber, M.E.  (2010). Marine Biology.  (8th ed.) New York, N.Y.:McGraw Hill
(or most recent edition). 

G.  REFERENCE MATERIALS
Current publications and periodicals of relevance and video/DVDs as relevant.

H.  INSTRUCTIONAL COSTS
Replacement of laboratory equipment approximately $200 per year, transportation and supplies associated with field trips approximately $1200 per year.

I.   EVALUATION
None

J.   CREDIT BY EXAMINATION
None

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