ESS/SC-200 Fundamentals of Wellness

Course Description:
This course is designed to give students the skills and knowledge necessary to make informed choices concerning their health.  Emphasis will be placed on the importance of physical activity, and experiencing the process of change.  Students will learn how to assess various components of their wellness, as well as behavior modification techniques.  Course topics include improving fitness and nutrition, weight control, reducing the risks of cardiovascular disease/cancer/diabetes, stress management, prevention of sexually transmitted diseases, prevention of substance abuse, and overall management of personal health and lifestyle habits to achieve the highest potential for well-being. 

A. PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES (PLOs):

The student will be able to:
1. Determine healthy lifestyles by describing the value of physical activity to a healthful lifestyle and participating in regular physical activity for at least one semester.
2. Demonstrate professionalism, interpersonal skills, teamwork, leadership and decision making skills

B. STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES ( SLOs): -GENERAL

The student will be able to:
1. Explain physical fitness and wellness, as well as their importance to overall health, disease prevention, and athletic performance.
2. Demonstrate the physical skills necessary to perform a variety of physical activities.
3. Design and demonstrate exercise regimes appropriate to improve health, physical fitness, and athletic performance.
4. Value regular physical activity and its contribution to a healthful lifestyle.

SLO

PLO 1

PLO 2

1

ID

I

2

IDM

ID

3

ID

ID

4

ID

IDM

I = Introduced
D = Demonstrated
M = Mastered

C. STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (SLOs) - SPECIFIC:

The student will be able to:

General SLO 1. Explain physical fitness and wellness, as well as their importance to overall health, disease prevention, and athletic performance.


Student Learning Outcomes

Assessment Strategies

    1. Identify and describe the basic components of wellness and physical fitness

Quiz, Test items

    1. Describe the benefits and the significance of participating in a lifetime fitness and wellness program

Oral and written report

    1. Assess his/her current wellness in the areas of physical fitness, nutrition, weight control, stress management, drug use, and disease risk (including sexually transmitted diseases, cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes, and cancer) and use those results to set realistic wellness goals based on accepted models of behavior change.

Assessment questionnaire
Individual oral and written report

    1. Describe the important role regular medical check-ups play in lifetime fitness and wellness.

Individual oral and written report

    1. Explain the importance of healthy behaviors in the prevention of cardiovascular disease, cancer and type II diabetes.

Test items

         
General SLO 2. Demonstrate the physical skills necessary to perform a variety of physical activities.


Student Learning Outcomes

Assessment Strategies

    1. Identify and demonstrate the loco-motor and non loco-motor movements

Practicum
(graded performance with rubrics)

    1. Perform the motor skills in sports activities, rhythmic activities, gymnastics skills and recreational activities

Practicum
(graded performance with rubrics)

    1. Exhibit the physical skills through mass or field demonstration

Practicum
(graded performance with rubrics)

 

General SLO 3. Design and demonstrate exercise regimes appropriate to improve health, physical fitness, and athletic performance.


Student Learning Outcomes

Assessment Strategies

    1. Identify and perform the different fitness test for cardio-vascular endurance, power, flexibility, agility, speed and muscular strength

Practicum
(graded performance with rubrics)

    1. Identify the symptoms of common exercise-related injuries, preventative measures, and basic treatment

Test items

    1. Design training programs to develop and improve physical fitness and athletic performance

Oral and written report

    1. Demonstrate the principles of training like principles of specificity, over load, progression, and circuit training

Individual and group (graded performance )

General SLO 4. Value regular physical activity and its contribution to a healthful lifestyle.


Student Learning Outcomes

Assessment Strategies

    1. Define cardiovascular disease, cancer, and type II diabetes, and explain recent lifestyle changes in the FSM associated with the increased incidence of these diseases.

Test items
Oral and written report

    1. Explain the importance of healthy behaviors in the prevention of cardiovascular disease, cancer and type II diabetes.

Test items
Oral and written report

    1. Describe the detrimental health effects of tobacco, alcohol, marijuana and betelnut, and the benefits of cessation

Test items
Oral and written report

    1. Describe the symptoms of common sexually transmitted diseases (including HIV), and their health consequences.

Test items
Oral and written report

    1. Define obesity and explain the health risks correlated with it.

Test items
Oral and written report

 

D.  COURSE CONTENT

I) Introduction to Wellness

            1. Components of Wellness
            2. Self-assessment of Wellness
            3. Lifestyle Management
            4. Making Wellness a career
            5. Behavior change

    II) Model of Change

            1. Tran theoretical model
            2. Self-assessment of stage of change
            3. Methods to move from one stage of change to another
            4. Setting Wellness goals
            5. Health Screening, preparedness for physical activity

III) Physical Fitness

          1. Developing each of the components of fitness
          2. FITT principle
          3. Overload and specificity theory
          4. Stage of change strategies for changing exercise habits
          5. Designing balanced fitness routines

IV) Nutrition

          1. The roles of the six nutrients
          2. Food sources of each nutrient
          3. Harvard School of Public Health Food Pyramid
          4. Making healthy food choices

V) Weight management

          1. Assessing weight and wellness
          2. Underweight, Overweight, Over fat
          3. Choosing a healthy weight
          4. Designing programs for weight loss and control
          5.  Designing stress management programs

VI) Chronic Diseases

          1. Early detection
          2. Cardiovascular diseases
          3. Stage of change strategies for changing behaviors that increase disease risk

VII) Drug Abuse

          1. Various medical programs for drug use cessation
          2. Stage of change strategies for cessation of drug use
          3. Designing personal drug rehabilitation programs
          4. Physical/mental effects of tobacco, alcohol, marijuana & betelnut
          5. Dependency/Addiction
          6. Assessment of current risk of addiction
          7. Drug use and disease risk

VIII) Sexually Transmitted Diseases

          1. Common curable and non-curable STDs
          2. Physical/mental effects of STDs
          3. Detection and treatment
          4. Barrier protection
          5. Assessment of current risk of contracting an STD
          6. Protection vs. prevention of STDs

IX) Self-Assessment of Wellness

          1. Review of progress towards wellness goals
          2. Setting goals for the future
          3. Preparing for a career in Wellness
          4. Review previous concept

 

E. METHODS OF INSTRUCTION:


Demonstration, participation in mini-tournament, lecture, individual assignments, teamwork, film showing.

F. REQUIRED TEXT(S) AND COURSE MATERIALS

Hoeger, WWK and Hoeger, SA.  Fitness and Wellness.  Wadsworth: 2004 (or most recent edition).

Bottled water and appropriate attire (loose-fitting, comfortable clothing that allows a full range of motion around all of the joints of the body) on fitness assessment days. 

G. REFERENCE MATERIALS

American College of Sports Medicine. “Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes: Position Stand.” Med Sci Sports & Ex 32(7) (2000).

 Beck, A. and Katcher, A.  Between Pets and People: The Importance of Animal Companionship.  Toronto: General Publishing Co. (1983).
Cardinal, B. J., Cardinal M. K., and Burger, M.  “Lifetime Fitness for Health Course Assessment: Implications for Curriculum Improvement,” Journal of Physical Education, Recreation and Dance, 76(8): 48-52, 2005.

Carpinelli, Otto & Winett.  “A critical analysis of the ACSM position stand on resistance training:  Insufficient evidence to support recommended training protocols,” Journal of Exercise Physiology online, 7(3):1-60, 2004.

Dobbin, Jay. “Drugs in Micronesia.”  Micronesian Counselor18: Apr. 1996. http://www.micsem.org/pubs/counselor/frames/drugmicrofr.htm?http&&&www.micsem.org/pubs/counselor/drugmicro.htm

Hezel, Francis X. Health in Micronesia Over the Years.”  Micronesian Counselor 53: Nov. 2004.  http://www.micsem.org/pubs/counselor/pdf/mc53.pdf

Hezel, Francis X., Edwin Q.P. Petteys, and Deborah L. Chang.  “Sustainable Human Development in the FSM: Health” MicSem Articles: Economics.  Online 9/8/2005 http://www.micsem.org/pubs/articles/economic/shd/frames/chapter07fr.htm?http&&&www.micsem.org/pubs/articles/economic/shd/chapter07.htm

Katzmarzyk and Craig. Musculoskeletal fitness and risk of mortality.”  Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise 34(5): 740-4, 2002.

Leon, et al. “Leisure time physical activity and the 16-year risks of mortality from coronary heart disease and all-causes in the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial (MRFIT).” Int J Sports Med. 1997 Jul;18 Suppl 3:S208-15. Baechle and Earle, eds. National Strength & Conditioning Association: Essentials of Strength Training and Conditioning-2nd Edition. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics 2000.

O’Donnell, Michael P.  “A Simple Framework to Describe What Works Best: Improving Awareness, Enhancing Motivation, Building Skills, and Providing Opportunity.”  American Journal of Health Promotion, The Art of Health Promotion 20: 1-6, 2005.

 Ornish, Dean.  Love and Survival: 8 Pathways to Intimacy and Health.  New York: HarperCollins Publishing 1998.

Schnohr, et al. “Changes in Leisure-time Physical Activity and Risk of Death: An Observational Study of 7,000 Men and Women,” Am J Epidemiol 2003; 158:639-644. http://aje.oupjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/158/7/639

H. INSTRUCTIONAL COST

None

I. EVALUATION

None

J. CREDIT BY EXAMINATION

None

 

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