ESL 092 Ace English II

Course Description

The purpose of this course is to prepare at-risk students for entry into and success in entry-level college English listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills coursework. Emphasis will be on acquisition of integrated English communication skills in a wide range of activities and content areas. The course is divided into units in which students explore a common theme around which the language skills are structured.

Note:: “Achieving College Excellence” is a sequence of course modules designed to assist transitional degree students who have not achieved full degree status, as determined by COMET scores, in preparing them for entry into a degree program. Upon passing all course modules, they shall be deemed minimally qualified to engage in degree coursework.

Course Prepared by: ACE Faculty
Campus Site: Pohnpei Campus
Course Type Hrs/Week No./Weeks Total Hrs Divisor Semester Credits
Lecture/Lab 12 6 72 /16 4
Total Semester Credits 4
  • This course also meets General Education Goals #(s): None

Prequisite Course(s): Successful completion of ACE English I or placement on the COMET.

  1. PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES (PLOs):


    The student will be able to:
    1. Demonstrate mastery in math and English skills to be able to complete successfully an introductory level course.
    2. Determine the value of lifelong learning and demonstrate the skills and attitudes necessary for the attainment of academic goals.
    3. Demonstrate critical thinking skills necessary to analyze, interpret, evaluate, process, and apply academic content.
    4. Utilize and transfer knowledge of the foundations and concepts for math and English to the academic setting.
  2. STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (SLOs): GENERAL


    The student will be able to:
    1. Utilize the English language for interpersonal and academic communication in preparation for regular college work and demonstrate proficiency in critical and analytical thinking skills
    2. Demonstrate pre-reading, reading, and post-reading skills for reading academic texts
    3. Write well-organized essays using appropriate sentence structures, grammar, the writing process, and time management skills
    4. Apply the fundamentals of the English language to the academic setting

    SLOs

    PLO1

    PLO2

    PLO3

    PLO4

    1

    M

     

    DM

    DM

    2

    M

    M

    M

    DM

    3

    M

    M

    DM

    DM

    4

    M

    ID

    ID

    DM

    I = Introduced
    D = Demonstrated
    M =- Mastered

  3. STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (SLOs): SPECIFIC


    The student will be able to:

    General SLO 1.Utilize the English language for interpersonal and academic communication in preparation for regular college work and demonstrate proficiency in critical and analytical thinking skills

    Student Learning Outcomes Assessments Strategies
    1.1 1.1 Present clear and accurate factual information to small and large groups after researching assigned content. Group discussions and oral presentations with a graded rubric.
    1.2 Analyze orally presented material for both stated and inferred ideas. Oral and written exercises with a graded rubric.
    1.3 Critique presentations given by classmates and provide appropriate feedback. Graded rubric handout exercises, oral and written comments.
    1.4 Define new vocabulary related to chapter themes. Class work, quizzes, tests.

    General SLO 2: Demonstrate pre-reading, reading, and post-reading skills for reading academic texts

    Student Learning Outcomes Assessments Strategies
    2.1 Apply pre-reading skills such as surveying a text, establishing a purpose for reading, and employing background knowledge. In-class work, homework assignment, quizzes, and tests.
    2.2 Identify implied ideas, make inferences, draw conclusions, determine relevance, and cause and effect. Written exercises with a graded rubric, tests.
    2.3 Rephrase and explain main ideas from a reading passage. In-class work, home work assignment, quizzes, and tests./td>
    2.4 Summarize reading passage. Written exercises, summary and essay writings.
    2.5 Synthesize information by relating new information to prior knowledge, experience, interests, and opinions. In-class work, home work assignment, group work project.
    2.6 Employ context clues and decoding skills to deduce vocabulary meanings. Vocabulary exercises, quizzes, and tests.
    2.7 Demonstrate skimming and scanning skills Timed exercises and quizzes.

    General SLO 3: Write well-organized essays using appropriate sentence structures, grammar, the writing process, and time management skills

    Student Learning Outcomes Assessments Strategies
    3.1 Write correctly structured paragraphs with topic sentences and supporting details. Multiple written drafts with a graded rubric.
    3.2 Organize 5- paragraph essays. Pre-writing, writing, and post writing essay projects, 1st and final draft essays with graded rubrics.
    3.3 Write coherent 5- paragraph essays. Submit 1st, 2nd, and final draft essays with graded rubrics.
    3.4 revise 5-paragraph essays. Student peer editing activities, student and teacher conferences.
    3.5 Edit 5-paragraph essays. Submit final draft with corrections, graded with a rubric.
    3.6 utilize new vocabulary related to chapter themes. Submit essays with incorporation of new terms, graded with a checklist.

    General SLO 4: Apply the fundamentals of the English language to the academic setting.

    Student Learning Outcomes Assessments Strategies
    4.1 Apply pre-reading, reading, and post reading skills to graded reading passages of increasing difficulty. In-class individual and group discussions/presentation, writing projects, quizzes, or exam.
    4.2 Apply reading passage theme to demonstrate the writing process. Submit MLA format essay, graded with a rubric.
  4. COURSE CONTENT


    The course will focus on reading strategies necessary for students to effectively process academic content materials and will be divided into academic themes. Themes must include a topic on valuing lifelong learning. Students will read, discuss, present orally and write about the academic themes. Study skills such as time management, decision making, and goal setting are emphasized in the process of writing and preparing assignments

    1. Pre-reading skills; listening; pre-writing
      • Surveying-books, chapters, text
      • Establishing a purpose for listening and reading
      • Predicting
      • Outlining/note taking/graphic organizers/free-writing/guided writing
    2. Reading skills; speaking, writing; critical thinking
      • Identify main idea, supporting details, facts & opinions, implied ideas and inferences
      • Draw conclusions
      • Determine relevance and identify cause and effect
      • Context clues/root words/pre-fixes & suffixes
      • Asking and answering questions
      • Thesis statements/topic sentences/supporting details/drafting
      • Essay construction
      • Rhetorical patterns: example (3 essays)
    3. Post-reading skills; speaking, writing
      • Summarizing/rephrasing
      • Expressing opinions/responding to written text orally and in writing
      • 1-3 minute oral presentations
      • Revising and editing
      • Grammar:
        • subject-verb agreement
        • sentence fragments
        • misplaced modifiers
        • pronoun antecedents
  5. METHODS OF INSTRUCTION

    Lecture/discussion, group work, oral presentations, guest speakers, computer assisted learning, collaborative learning, class assignments
  6. REQUIRED TEXT(S) AND COURSE MATERIALS


    1. Required Text:
      • Smith, Nila Banton. (2002). Be a Better Reader. Level F 9. Prentice-Hall. (or most recent edition).
      • Blanchard, Karen & Root, Christine.(2007). Writing Preparation and Practice 3 Pearson Company.(or most recent edition).
    2. Required Materials: One novel from the 8-10 graded reading level of the Townsend Press Library series. Text to be selected by the division chair in consultation with the ESL/developmental faculty. The complete list of books in the series can be viewed at http://www.townsendpress.com/books.php.
  7. REFERENCE MATERIALS

    i. Listening

    • Adams, Thomas W., and Susan R. Kuder. (1994). Attitudes through Idioms. Newbury House. (or most recent edition).
    • Beylan, David., and Neil Murry. (1993). Contemporary Topics. NY: Longman. (or most recent edition).
    • Dunkel, Patricia., and Frank Pialosi. (1982). Advanced Listening Comprehension. (Tapes) (or most recent edition).
    • James, Gauge., Charles G. Whitley., and Sharon Bode. (1980). Listening in and Speaking out. NY: Longman. (Tapes) (or most recent edition).
    • King, Carol., and Nancy Stanley. (1989). Building Skills for the TOEFL. Nelson. (Tapes) (or most recent edition).
    • Roguski, Connie., and Edith Palmberg. (1990). Academic Mini-Lectures. Heinle & Heinle (Tapes). (or most recent edition).

    ii. Supplemental Reading

    • Ashby, Gene. Ed. (1985). Somethings of Value: Micronesian Customs and Beliefs. Or: Rainy Day Press (or most recent edition).
    • Ashby, Gene. Ed. (1985). Never and Always: Micronesian Legends, Fables and Folklore, Or: Rainy Day Press (or most recent edition).
    • Other materials selected by the instructor, including but not limited to newspaper or magazine articles, novels and short stories, reference texts, local or regional publications
    • Computer software selected by the instructor, including but not limited to, Speed Reader and TOEFL Mastery.

    iii. Writing

    • Azar, Betty Schrampfer. (1989). Understanding and using English grammar, 2nd Ed. Prentice Hall Regents, Upper Saddle River, NJ. (Textbooks and Workbooks, Volumes A and B) (or most recent edition).
    • Winkersky, Joy, Boerer, Jan., and Diana Holquin-Bologh. (1992). Writing paragraphs and essays. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Pub. (or most recent edition).
    • Other supplemental materials selected by the instructor, including, but not limited to, reference texts, newspaper or magazine articles, local or regional publications.
    • Computer software selected by the instructor, including, but not limited to, Perfect Copy.

  8. INSTRUCTIONAL COSTS

    None
  9. EVALUATION

    • Formative: quizzes, written work, oral presentations, and class discussion participation.
    • Summative: At the end of the six weeks, an essay graded with the COMET essay rubric and a standardized reading test.
      P (Pass) = 45 and above on the essay; 10th grade and above reading comprehension
      N (No credit) = below 45 on the essay; below 10th grade reading comprehension
  10. CREDIT BY EXAMINATION

    None

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