EN 205 (Literature of the Sea)

GENERAL INFORMATION:

Course Title: EN 205 (Literature of the Sea)

Campus:Chuuk Campus Initiator:Alton Higashi (Education and Social Science) Date: April 10, 2017
Course Description:This course is a multi-genre examination of literature of the sea, with an emphasis upon works about the Pacific and by writers of or from the Pacific region. The student will examine, analyze and interpret nautical literature in the following genres: drama, poetry, fiction (both novels and short stories), and non-fiction. The student will also create a poem and a short story or short play.

Course Hours/Credits:

  Hours per Week No. of Weeks Total Hours Semester Credits
Lecture 3 16 48/16 3
Laboratory        
Workshop        
      Total Semester Credits: 3

 

Purpose of Course:

  • [X] Degree elective (AS Liberal Arts, and AA Teacher Preparation)

PREREQUISITES: EN 110, EN 120a, and EN 120b

PSLOS OF OTHER PROGAMS THIS COURSE MEETS:

PSLO # Program
GenEd 1.1 Write a clear, well-organized paper using documentation and quantitative tools when appropriate.
GenEd 1.2 Make a clear, well-organized verbal presentation.
GenEd 2.1 Demonstrate the ability for independent thought and expression.
GenEd 4.2 Demonstrate knowledge of the cultural issues of a person’s own culture and other cultures.
GenEd 4.3 Demonstrate knowledge of major historical events affecting one’s culture and other cultures.

(1) Institutional Student Learning Outcome:

[X] 1. Effective oral communication: capacity to delivery prepared, purposeful presentations designed to increase knowledge, to foster understanding, or to promote change in the listeners’ attitudes, values, beliefs, or behaviors.

[ X ] 2. Effective written communication: development and expression of ideas in writing through work in many genres and styles, utilizing different writing technologies, and mixing texts, data, and images through iterative experiences across the curriculum.

[ X ] 3. Critical thinking: a habit of mind characterized by the comprehensive exploration of issues, ideas, artifacts, and events before accepting or formulating an opinion or conclusion.

[ ] 4. Problem-solving: capacity to design, evaluate, and implement a strategy to answer an open-ended question or achieve a desired goal.

[ X ] 5. Intercultural knowledge and competence: a set of cognitive, affective, and behavioral skills and characteristics that support effective and appropriate interaction in a variety of cul-tural contexts.

[ ] 6. Information literacy: ability to know when there is a need for information; and to identify, locate, evaluate, and effectively and responsibly use and share that information for the problem at hand.

[ ] 7. Foundations and skills for life-long learning: purposeful learning activity, undertaken on an on-going basis with the aim of improving knowledge, skills, and competence.

[ ] 8. Quantitative reasoning: ability to reason and solve quantitative problems from a wide array of authentic contexts and everyday life situations; to comprehend and create sophisticated arguments support by quantitative evidence; and to communicate clearly those arguments in a variety of formats.

(2) PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES (PLOs): The student will be able to:

1. Enrich and deepen self-knowledge by exploring different academic experiences.
2. Articulate and understand personal experiences through effective writing, reading, speaking, and various models of artistic expression.
3. Demonstrate fundamental knowledge and basic skills appropriate to personal and professional goals in one’s chosen area of specialization.

(3) COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CSLOs) GENERAL: The student will be able to:

1. Identify and analyze basic literary genres of drama, poetry, fiction (both novels and short stories), and non-fiction;
2. Describe the ways in which cultural circumstances and values are reflected in the literature one examines and creates;
3. Explain how the historical background in which this literature was created impacts the literature;
4. Discuss the ways in which the themes and patterns of literature of the sea provide insights into human experience, with an emphasis upon the Pacific experience; and
5. Communicate effectively one’s analyses, interpretations and critiques in group discussions and presentations about nautical literature across multiple genres.

EN 205 Literature of the Sea                                                                       Recommended by CC: 4/10/17
Approved by VPIA: 4/20/17

 

(4) STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (SLOs) SPECIFIC: The student will be able to:

 

CSLO (General) #1: Identify and analyze basic literary genres of drama, poetry, fiction (both novels and short stories), and non-fiction
Student Learning Outcomes ISLO PSLO Assessment Strategies
1.1 Identify the types of drama and literary terms, and analyze at least 7 of its literary terms (comedy, tragedy, melodrama, tragicomedy, spectacles, scene, and act). 1,3 1,2 Worksheets and/or quiz- zes, plus presentation of a short play (with a rubric, as needed)
1.2 Identify the types of fiction and non-fiction, and analyze at least 7 of its literary elements (plot, character, setting, conflict, mood, theme, and denouement). 2,3 1,2 Worksheets and essay test (with a rubric, as needed)
1.3 Identify the types of poetry and poetic elements, and analyze at least 7 of its poetic elements/ techniques (rhyme, onomatopoeia, imagery, shape, simile, personification, and metaphor). 2,3 1,2 Worksheets and/or quiz- zes, plus essay test on interpretation of poems (with a rubric, as needed)

CSLO (General) #2: Describe the ways in which cultural circumstances and values are reflected in the literature one examines and creates

2.1 Describe relationships among at least 3 pieces of literature being studied (drama, poetry, and fiction) and their cultural settings. 1,2,3,4,5 1,2 Group discussion and essay test (with a rubric, as needed)
2.2 Discuss specific elements in a genre reading that reflects the values of a culture. 1,2,3,4,5 1,2 Group discussion and essay test (with a rubric, as needed)
CSLO (General) #3: Explain how the historical background in which this literature was created im-pacts the literature
3.1 Identify and discuss the historical period dur- ing which at least 3 pieces of literature being studied (drama, poetry, and fiction) originated. 1,3 1,2 Group discussion, work- sheets and/or quizzes
3.2 Describe the significance of the historical con- text of each piece of literature being examined. 1,2,3 1,2 Group discussion and essay test (with a rubric, as needed)
CSLO (General) #4: Discuss the ways in which the themes and patterns of literature of the sea pro-vide insights into human experience, with an emphasis upon the Pacific experience
4.1 Compare and contrast common themes found across multiple genres in the literature. 1,3 1,2 Group discussion, work sheets and/or quizzes
4.2 Discuss personal experiences in the context of themes found across multiple genres in the literature. 1,2,3 1,2 Essay test and individual presentation (both with rubrics, as needed)
CSLO (General) #5: Communicate effectively one’s analyses, interpretations and critiques in group discussions and presentations about nautical literature across multiple genres including a poem, short story, or play developed by the student.
5.1 Argue persuasively with supporting evidence a common theme or pattern of literature across multiple genres in the literature. 2,3 1,2 Essay test (with a rubric, as needed)
5.2 Participate actively in analysis, summary, and interpretation of various genres in the literature. 1,3 1,2 Checklists with Likert scale (to measure accuracy in class discussion)
5.3 Prepare two original and creative pieces of nautical literature – a poem and a short story/ drama, such that: • The poem is formatted as a haiku, tanka, catalogue poem, free verse, or ballad; and • The short story/drama is based on a Micro- nesian legend or with the ocean as the setting, theme, or source of conflict. 2,3 1,2 Checklists with Likert scale (to measure style, creativity, and other literary elements; and to measure application of one’s analyses, interpretations, and critiques of literature)

 

EN 205 Literature of the Sea                                                                       Recommended by CC: 4/10/17
Approved by VPIA: 4/20/17

 

(5) COURSE CONTENT:

1. Introductory information about the sea
a. the nature of the sea/ocean – as the setting, theme, or conflict of different genres of the literature of the sea – as well as weather conditions and nautical creatures
b. island geography and lifestyles, including sea vessels as well as Micronesian beliefs, values, and nautical terms and phrases
2. Three general genres of literature – narrative (fiction/non-fiction), poetry, and drama – related to the sea
3. Fiction and non-fiction related to the sea
a. Micronesian legends, fairy tales, short stories, and biographies
b. Short novels
4. Poetry related to the sea
5. Drama related to the sea

(6) METHODS OF INSTRUCTION:

[ X ] Lecture
[ ] Laboratory
[ X ] Audio-visual
[ X ] Cooperative learning groups
[ X ] In-class exercises
[ X ] Demonstrations
[ X ] Other: reader’s theater; and creative projects

(7) REQUIRED TEXT(S) AND COURSE MATERIALS:
None.

EN 205 Literature of the Sea                                                                       Recommended by CC: 4/10/17
Approved by VPIA: 4/20/17


(8) RECOMMENDED COURSE MATERIALS:
• Readings representative of the various genres will be selected by the instructor, if available or on loan in the library
• Recommended titles are listed below.

Campbell, Alistair (1989). The Frigate Bird. Auckland: Heinemann Reed. Print.

Coleridge, Samuel Taylor (1992). “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner.” The Top 500 Poems: A Columbia Anthology. Ed. William Harmon. New York: Columbia University Press. 433-457. Print.

Davis, Thomas R.A. (1992). Vaka: Saga of a Polynesian Canoe. Auckland: Polynesian Press. Print.

Duff, Alan (1990). Once Were Warriors. Auckland: Tandem Press. Print.

Figiel, Sia (1996). The Girl in the Moon Circle. Suva, Fiji: Muna Publications. Print.

Flood, Bo (1999). Marianas Islands Myth and Magic. Honolulu: Bess Press. Print.

Flood, Bo; Beret Strong, and William Flood, eds. (1999). Pacific Island Legends: Tales from Micronesia, Melanesia, Polynesia, and Australia. Honolulu, Bess Press. Print.

Frost, Robert (1928). Once by the Pacific. Print.

Hau’ola, Epeli (1995). Kisses in the Nederends. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press. Print.

Hemingway, Ernest (1995). The Old Man and the Sea. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons. Print.

Homer (2005). The Odyssey. Ed. David Kleiner. New Jersey: Townsend Press. Print.

Hulme, Keri (2005). The Bone People. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press. Print.

Ihimaera, Witi Tame (2002). The Whale Rider. Auckland, NZ: Reed Books. Print.

London, Jack (July 1899). “The Handsome Cabin Boy.” The Owl Magazine, v.7. Print.

O’Dell, Scott (1988). Island of the Blue Dolphins. New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. Print.

Poe, Edgar Allan (1991). “Annabel Lee.” The Top 500 Poems: A Columbia Anthology. Ed. William Harmon. New York: Columbia University Press. 631. Print.

Soaba, Russell (1985). Maiba: A Novel of Papua New Guinea. Washington, D.C.: Three Continents Press. Print.

Sperry, Armstrong (1940). Call It Courage. New York: MacMillan. Print.

Stevenson, Robert Louis (1991). “Requiem.” The Top 500 Poems: A Columbia Anthology. Ed. William Harmon. New York: Columbia University Press. 807. Print.

Synge, John Millington (1960). “Riders to the Sea.” The Complete Plays: John M. Synge. New York: Random House, Inc. 81-98. Print.

Tobin, Jack (2002). Stories from the Marshall Islands. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press. Print.

Tennyson, Alfred Lord (1991). “Break, Break, Break.” The Top 500 Poems: A Columbia Anthology. Ed. William Harmon. New York: Columbia University Press. 643. Print.

Tennyson, Alfred Lord (1991). “Crossing the Bar.” The Top 500 Poems: A Columbia Anthology. Ed. William Harmon. New York: Columbia University Press. 643. Print.

Vaite, Celestine Hitiura (2000). Breadfruit. New York: Bantam, 2000. Print.

Wendt, Albert (1992). Black Rainbow. Auckland: Penguin Books. Print.

Whitman, Walt (1991). “O Captain! My Captain!” The Top 500 Poems: A Columbia Anthology. Ed. William Harmon. New York: Columbia University Press. 692. Print.

(9) REFERENCE MATERIALS:
Library books, Internet materials, and hand-outs.

(10) INSTRUCTIONAL COSTS:
None.

(11) EVALUATION:
Summative final exam.

(12) CREDIT BY EXAMINATION:
None.

EN 205 Literature of the Sea Recommended by CC: 4/10/17
Approved by VPIA: 4/20/17

 

This website and all COM-FSM Internet based services are best viewed with Firefox 3.0 or better.
© Copyright 2014 College of Micronesia-FSM | Site Disclaimer
P. O. Box 159, Kolonia, Pohnpei, 96941 - (691) 320-2480
College of Micronesia-FSM is accredited by the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges,
Western Association of Schools and Colleges, 10 Commercial Bldv., Suite 204, Novato, CA 94949, (415) 506-0234,
an institutional accrediting body recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation and the U.S. Department of Education.
Additional information about accreditation, including the filing of complaints against member institutions, can be found at: www.accjc.org

feedback