EN 209 Introduction to Religion

GENERAL INFORMATION:

Course No. and Title: EN 209 Introduction to Religion

Campus: National, Chuuk, Kosrae, Yap, Online

Initiator: Daniel Helman

Date: November 16, 2020

 

Course description: This course is designed to expose students to a wide variety of religious beliefs and practices. Students will examine major religions of the world as well as the questions and issues that religion tries to address.

 

COURSE HOURS/CREDITS:

 

   

Hours per Week

 

No. Of Weeks

 

Total Hours

 

Semester Credits

Lecture

 

3

x

16

x

48

=

3

Laboratory

   

x

 

x

 

=

 

Workshop

               
         

Total Semester

Credits

 

3

                     

PURPOSE OF COURSE:

[ ] Degree requirement

[x] Degree elective

[ ] Certificate

[ ] Other:

 

PREREQUISITES: EN 110, EN 120a

 

PSLOS OF OTHER PROGRAMS THIS COURSE MEETS:

 

PSLO#

Program

1.1 Write a clear, well-organized paper using documentation and quantitative tools when appropriate.

General Education

1.2 Make a clear, well-organized verbal presentation.

General Education

2.1 Demonstrate the ability for independent thought and expression.

General Education

2.2 Demonstrate understanding of the modes of inquiry by identifying an appropriate method of accessing credible information and data resources; applying the selected method; and organizing results.

General Education

4.1 Demonstrate a fundamental knowledge of world geography.

General Education

4.2 Demonstrate knowledge of the cultural issues of a person’s own culture and other cultures.

General Education

4.3 Demonstrate knowledge of major historical events affecting one’s culture and other cultures.

General Education

4.4 Demonstrate familiarity with contemporary global issues.

General Education

4.5 Demonstrate an understanding of major ethical concerns.

General Education

5.2 Demonstrate professionalism, interpersonal skills, teamwork, leadership and decision making skills.

General Education

 

1) INSTITUTIONAL STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

 

[x]

1. Effective oral communication: capacity to deliver prepared, purposeful presentations designed to increase knowledge, to foster understanding, or to promote change in the listeners’ attitudes, values, beliefs, or behaviors.

[x]

2. Effective written communication: development and expression of ideas in writing through work in many genres and styles, utilizing different writing technologies, and mixing texts, data, and images through iterative experiences across the curriculum.

[x]

3. Critical thinking: a habit of mind characterized by the comprehensive exploration of issues, ideas, artifacts, and events before accepting or formulating an opinion or conclusion.

[ ]

4. Problem solving: capacity to design, evaluate, and implement a strategy to answer an open-ended question or achieve a desired goal.

[x]

5. Intercultural knowledge and competence: a set of cognitive, affective, and behavioral skills and characteristics that support effective and appropriate interaction in a variety of cultural contexts.

[ ]

6. Information literacy: the ability to know when there is a need for information, to be able to identify, locate, evaluate, and effectively and responsibly use and share that information for the problem at hand.

[x]

7. Foundations and skills for life-long learning : purposeful learning activity, undertaken on an ongoing basis with the aim of improving knowledge, skills, and competence.

[ ]

8. Quantitative Reasoning: ability to reason and solve quantitative problems from a wide array of authentic contexts and everyday life situations; comprehends and can create sophisticated arguments supported by quantitative evidence and can clearly communicate those arguments in a variety of formats.

2) PROGRAM STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (PSLOs): The student will be able to:

 

1. Enrich and deepen self-knowledge by exploring different academic experiences.

2. Articulate and understand their experiences through effective writing, reading, speaking, and various modes of artistic expression.

3. Demonstrate fundamental knowledge and basic skills appropriate to their personal and professional goals in their chosen area of specialization.

 

3) COURSE STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (CSLOs) (General): The student will be able to:

 

The student will be able to:

1. Know, value, and interpret the general beliefs and practices of various world religions.

2. Know and interpret various answers that can be given to the questions and issues that religion tries to address.

3. State and defend their own personal religious belief.

4) COURSE STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (CSLOs) (Specific): The student will be able to:

CSLO (General) 1: Know, value, and interpret the general beliefs and practices of various world religions.

1. Student Learning Outcomes (specific)

2. ISLO

3. PSLO

Assessment Strategies

1.1. Place major religions on a world map as to where they geographically began and are concentrated currently.

1,2,3,5,7

1,2

1.1. Complete worksheets, take quizzes, and participate in group discussions and activities, including writing activities, which focus on the locations where major religions began and where they are concentrated currently. Discussions and other activities will be scored with a rubric.

1.2. Describe and interpret the major beliefs/tenets of various world religions.

1,2,3,5*,7

1,2

1.2. Complete worksheets, take quizzes, and participate in group discussions and activities, including writing activities, which describe the beliefs/tenets of various world religions. Discussions and other activities will be scored with a rubric.

1.3. Describe and interpret the primary religious practices of various world religions.

1,2,3,5,7

1,2

1.3. Complete worksheets, take quizzes, and participate in group discussions and activities, including writing activities, which focus on the primary religious practices of various world religions.Discussions and other activities will be scored with a rubric.

CSLO (General) 2. Know and interpret various answers that can be given to the questions and issues that religion tries to address.

Student Learning Outcomes (specific)

ISLO

PSLO

Assessment Strategies

2.1. Identify and interpret the major questions and issues that religion tries to address.

1,2,3,5,7

1,2,3

2.1. Complete worksheets, take quizzes, and participate in group discussions and activities, including writing activities, which deal with the major questions and issues that religion tries to address. Discussions and other activities will be scored with a rubric.

2.2. Compare and contrast how various religious groups would answer the questions and deal with the issues identified in 2.1.

1,2,3,5,7

1,2

2.2. Complete worksheets, take quizzes, and participate in group discussions and activities, including writing activities, which deal with how various religious groups would answer the questions and deal with the issues identified in 2.1. Discussions and other activities will be scored with a rubric.

2.3. Distinguish between religious, philosophical, and cultural points of the arguments.

1,2,3,5,7

1,2,3

2.3. Complete worksheets, take quizzes, and participate in group discussions and activities, including writing activities, which focus on distinguishing between religious, philosophical, and cultural points of the arguments. Discussions and other activities will be scored with a rubric.

CSLO (General) 3. State and defend their own personal religious belief.

Student Learning Outcomes (specific)

ISLO

PSLO

Assessment Strategies

3.1. Apply accurate terminology to construct a coherent and uplifting statement of personal faith/belief.

1,2,3,5,7

1,2,3

3.1. Complete worksheets, take quizzes, and participate in group discussions and activities, including writing activities, which focus on constructing a coherent and uplifting statement of personal faith/belief. Discussions and other activities will be scored with a rubric.

3.2. Respond to differences between their personal ideas and those held by other individuals and religious groups, and suggest a basis to support their own views.

1,2,3,5,7

1,2

3.2. Complete worksheets, take quizzes, and participate in group discussions, and activities, and write a major paper comparing their personal beliefs with others' religious beliefs, and suggest a basis to support their own views. Discussions, paper and other activities will be scored with a rubric.

3.3. Describe and interpret the effects of personal beliefs and religious practices on the larger community.

1,2,3,5,7

1,2,3

3.3. Complete worksheets, take quizzes, and participate in group discussions and activities, including writing activities, which focus on the effects of personal beliefs and religious practices on the larger community. Discussions and other activities will be scored with a rubric.

 

 

5) COURSE CONTENT:

The course provides an overview of current major religions of the world, with special emphasis on connections to Micronesia, and the dynamics between religion and culture. Such religions may include but are not limited to: Baha’i, Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Primal Religions, Shinto, Skepticism, and Taoism.

Additionally, the course examines major questions and issues in the field of religion, such as, but not limited to:

  • Who or what is god?
  • What is the nature of human beings?
  • What is the relationship between god and humans?
  • Why are we here?
  • What happens to us when we die?
  • Where does the power of religious texts derive from?
  • What is the role of religion and war?
  • What is the relation between religion and magic?
  • How do religious beliefs control or direct how people behave on a daily basis, including the choices they make (ethics, morals)?

6) METHOD(S) OF INSTRUCTION:

 

[x] Lecture [x] Cooperative learning groups

[ ] Laboratory [x] In-class exercises

[x] Audiovisual [ ] Demonstrations

[x] Other: projects, discussion, group presentation, computer activities, equivalent online activities.

7) REQUIRED TEXT(S) AND COURSE MATERIALS:

Mircea Eliade. Patterns in Comparative Religion. New York: Sheed & Ward. 1958 (Translated by Rosemary Sheed).

http://understandingworldreligions.com/classic%20works/Eliade%20Patterns%20in%20Comparative%20Religion.pdf

There are many books and reference materials available in the library and online that apply to this course. We will utilize a variety of resources and materials for the lessons and readings.

8) REFERENCE MATERIALS:

 

Many supplemental supporting materials are available through the Learning Resource Center and online. For example, all of these are available online:

Confessions of St. Augustine

The Talmud

The Quran

Analects of Confucius

The Dhammapada

Middle Length Discourses of the Buddha: Majjhima Nikaya

Yoga Sutras of Patanjali

Bhagavad Gita

Nihongi

Dreamtime Stories

Popol Vuh

Tao Te Ching

Tom Paine's Age of Reason

Writings of Baha'u'lla

9) INSTRUCTIONAL COSTS:

None.

10) EVALUATION:

 

The summative evaluation will be based on hands-on projects, midterm exam, and final exam.

 

11) CREDIT BY EXAMINATION:

 

None.

 

EN 209 Introduction to Religion CC endorsed: 12/04/20
 

VPIA approved: 12/22/20

 

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