EN-201 Introduction to Literature

Course Description: 
This course introduces students to various types of literature, including fiction, drama, and poetry.  Its purpose is to familiarize students with basic literary terminology and critical theories.

  • This course also meets PLO #(s) 2.1 and 2.2 of General Education program.
  • Prerequisite Courses: EN 120b

A.  PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES (PLOs): 
 The student will be able to:
1.   Enrich and deepen his or her self-knowledge by exploring different academic experiences.
2.   Articulate and understand their experiences through effective writing, reading, speaking and various modes of artistic expression.
3.   Demonstrate fundamental knowledge and basic skills appropriate to their personal and professional goals in their chosen area of specialization.

B.  STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (SLOs) - GENERAL: 
The student will be able to:
1. Define and identify the basic literary genres: narrative short fiction, drama, and poetry,                                   within a wide spectrum of world cultures and historical periods.
2. Define, identify, and apply literary critical theory and methods.
3 Identify basic literary terms, applying them interpretively to  assigned readings.
4. Write compositions on specific literary issues.


SLO

PLO1

PLO2

PLO3

1

 

IDM

 

2

 

ID

 

3

 

I

 

4

 

ID

 

I = Introduced
D = Demonstrated
M = Mastered
C.  STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (SLOs)-SPECIFIC: 
The student will be able to: 

General SLO 1.  The student will be able to define and identify the basic literary genres: narrative short fiction, drama, poetry, within a wide spectrum of world cultures and historical periods.


Student Learning Outcomes

Assessment Strategies

1.1 Recognize the differences within the various genres, cultural values and themes, and historical periods of the material read.

Orally identify the type of short fiction, play, or poem.
Discuss the historical and cultural values presented in each work; then be able to write about these values with a minimum of grammatical error.

 

General SLO 2: The student will be able to define, identify, and apply literary critical theory and methods.


Student Learning Outcomes

Assessment Strategies

2.1 Recognize classical drama, feminism, magical realism, existentialism, and historically based pieces of literature.

Quizzes, ability to respond accurately in both small group and full class discussions.

General SLO 3: The student will be able to identify basic literary terms, applying them interpretively to assigned readings.


Student Learning Outcomes

Assessment Strategies

3.1 Recognize literary devices, such as figurative language, irony, plot, allusion, tragedy, comedy, etc.

The student will be able to accurately discuss, both orally and in writing the author’s use of literary devices. He/she will pass quizzes and tests based on these devices with a minimum grade of a C.

General SLO 4:  The student will be able to write compositions on specific literary issues.


Student Learning Outcomes

Assessment Strategies

4.1 Prepare both informal in class responses,  more formal essays that examine topics such as the importance of point of view or the study of human characteristics portrayed in the various works. The student will also respond to written prompts on quizzes and tests.

The student will write responses that earn a minimum grade of a C, based on content, organization, word choice, conventional use of language, and the proper use of the MLA format.

 

D.  COURSE CONTENT
Because the course covers three genres of literature, it can be divided into three parts, each part of which covers a specific genre discretely. At the instructor's discretion it may also be organized in a way that the three genres are covered together throughout the course. However the course is structured, it should deal with the following three genres relatively equally.
1. Narrative: An anthology that includes a wide selection of short stories and authors, that encompasses works of differing historical periods and cultures (to include recent works) will serve the purpose. It is best to introduce students to stories from a variety of authors, historical periods, and geographical and cultural areas. An extended reading project is also suggested.
2. Drama: The course will give a sense of the historical development of drama. One of the plays of Sophocles might be a good place to start, but include selections from other cultures and periods, as well. While the language of the plays of Shakespeare might be difficult (particularly for those with an ESL background), students have responded well to them in the past when sufficient help was provided. Videos may also be used to appreciate dramatic performance since access to live plays is severely limited.
3. Poetry: The course will give a sense of the historical development of poetry. If available, recorded readings may be used. Student readings of poems to the class also helps the students "connect" with poetry.
E.  METHODS OF INSTRUCTION
The instructor may use but is not limited to: lectures, guest lectures, group discussion, individual and/or group presentations, movies and other media presentations, demonstrations, projects, quizzes, tests, and exercises.
F.  REQURIED TEXT(S) AND COURSE MATERIALS
Rosenberg, Donna.  World Literature, 2nd Edition. McGrawHill/Glencoe, 2004.   (or most recent edition).
Text for the extended, independent reading: Homer, The Odyssey. Townsend Press, 2005. 
G.  REFERENCE MATERIALS
Collegiate dictionary

H.  INSTRUCTIONAL COSTS
None

I.   EVALUATION
None

J.   CREDIT BY EXAMINATION
None

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