EN-120b Expository Writing II

Course Outline

GENERAL INFORMATION:

Course No. and Title: EN 120b-Expository Writing II

Campus: National Campus

Initiator:  Jothy John

Date:  May 21, 2019

 

Course Description:

This course focuses on improving students’ research, pre-writing, expository writing, and critical thinking skills. The course will provide the students with the basic skills necessary to write research-supported papers in the humanities, natural sciences and social sciences. Out of a total of three (3) research papers, one  (1) needs to be argumentative.  The others can be written in any rhetorical pattern.

 

COURSE HOURS/CREDITS:

 

 

 

 

Hours per Week   No.  Of Weeks   Total Hours   Semester Credits

Lecture

 

          3

x

16

=

48/16

=

 

Laboratory

 

         

x

 

x

 

=

 

Workshop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Semester

 

Credits

 

 

3

                     

 

PURPOSE OF COURSE:  

                                            [x] Degree requirement

                                            [  ] Degree elective

                                            [  ] Certificate

                                            [  ] Other:

 

PREREQUISITES:  

Passing EN 120a with a grade of C or better.

PSLOS OF OTHER PROGRAMS THIS COURSE MEETS:

  

PSLO#

                             Program

# 1 Effective Communication

General Education

# 2 Critical Thinking and Problem Solving

 

 

 INSTITUTIONAL STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

 

[ ]

1. Effective oral communication: capacity to deliver prepared, purposeful presentations designed to increase knowledge, to foster understanding, or to promote change in the listeners’ attitudes, values, beliefs, or behaviors.

 

[x]   

2. Effective written communication: development and expression of ideas in writing through work in many genres and styles, utilizing different writing technologies, and mixing texts, data, and images through iterative experiences across the curriculum.

[x]

3. Critical thinking: a habit of mind characterized by the comprehensive exploration of issues, ideas, artifacts, and events before accepting or formulating an opinion or conclusion.

[ ]

4. Problem solving: capacity to design, evaluate, and implement a strategy to answer an open-ended question or achieve a desired goal.

 

[ ]

5. Intercultural knowledge and competence: a set of cognitive, affective, and behavioral skills and characteristics that support effective and appropriate interaction in a variety of cultural contexts.

 

[x]

6. Information literacy: the ability to know when there is a need for information, to be able to identify, locate, evaluate, and effectively and responsibly use and share that information for the problem at hand.

[ ]

7. Foundations and skills for life-long learning: purposeful learning activity, undertaken on an ongoing basis with the aim of improving knowledge, skills, and competence.

 

[ ]   

8. Quantitative Reasoning: ability to reason and solve quantitative problems from a wide array of authentic contexts and everyday life situations; comprehends and can create sophisticated arguments supported by quantitative evidence and can clearly communicate those arguments in a variety of formats.

 PROGRAM STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (PSLOs): The student will be able to:

  • Write a clear, well-organized paper using documentation and quantitative tools when appropriate.
  • Demonstrate the ability for independent thought and expression.
  • Demonstrate understanding of the modes of inquiry by identifying an appropriate method of accessing credible information and data resources; applying the selected method; and organizing results.

COURSE STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (CSLOs) (General): The student will be able to:

  • Investigate research topics in a variety of disciplines.
  • Write research-supported papers in the humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences.
  • Establish and defend a position in an argumentative research paper.

COURSE STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (CSLOs) (Specific): The student will be able to:

CSLO (General) 1: Investigate research topics in a variety of disciplines.

1.       Student Learning Outcomes (specific)

2.       ISLO

3.        PSLO

4.        

Assessment Strategies

1.1 Locate and select appropriate, high-quality source materials by:

 

·      Applying techniques for interviewing experts.

 

 

·      Searching the Internet.

 

 

·      Using the library for print materials.

 

·      Viewing visual media/  multimedia.

 

·       Conducting  surveys and/or observational field research.

3.6

   2

 

 

 

·      Compose questions for interviews, conduct interviews, and submit summaries of interviews scored with a rubric.

 

·      Research and document information found online in bibliographies and papers.   assessed with a checklist and rubric.

 

·      Completion of online tutorials on locating and requesting sources checked by the instructor

 

·      Properly reference visual media/ multimedia as assessed with a checklist.

 

·      Analyze small-scale surveys and/or observational research as assessed with a rubric.

1.2 Distinguish primary and secondary    sources.

3, 6

2; 3

Distinguish primary and secondary sources on a quiz or handout. Classify and evaluate  sources using a checklist.

1.3 Differentiate  facts from opinions.

3, 6

2; 3

Differentiate facts from opinions on a handout, quiz, or through a class/group discussion as measured by a discussion rubric.

1.4 Conduct preliminary research to narrow a broad subject to a specific assignment topic.

3, 6

 

1; 3

 

Submit prewriting notes and compiled and edited annotated bibliographies to be scored with a rubric

 

 

 

CSLO (General) 2.  Write research-supported papers in the humanities, natural sciences, and       social sciences.

Student Learning Outcomes (specific)

5.        

ISLO

PSLO

Assessment Strategies

2.1 Demonstrate note-taking strategies to compile information from a variety of sources.

2, 3

1; 2

Research notes for evaluation following a checklist/rubric.

2.2 Prepare outlines and/or graphic organizers and/or utilize similar planning tools.

2, 3

1; 2

Develop outlines and/or graphic organizers for evaluation following a rubric/checklist.

2.3 Develop research thesis and/or hypothesis.

2, 3

1; 2

Develop  thesis for evaluation following a prescribed rubric.

2.4 Define plagiarism and take the steps necessary to avoid it.

2, 3

1; 2

Complete handouts or quizzes on plagiarism.Scrutinize drafts using a checklist or flow chart.

2.5 Summarize source texts.

2, 3

1; 2

Summarize and reference activities/class work of source texts in handouts, essays, and research papers scored with a rubric.

2.6 Paraphrase source texts.

2, 3

1; 2

Paraphrase and reference activities of source texts in handouts, essays, and research papers scored with a rubric

2.7 Synthesize ideas gleaned from a variety of sources, along with their own opinions, into cogent prose.

2, 3

1; 2

Synthesize ideas from several sources in handouts, essays, and research papers to be  assessed with a rubric.

2.8 Format formal papers utilizing the MLA style.

2, 3

3

Papers as assessed by an MLA format checklist.

2.9 Utilize the MLA documentation style to formally acknowledge sources. This will consist of brief parenthetical citations within the text that are keyed to an alphabetical list of works that appear at the end of the paper.

2, 3

3

 Papers with citations and a works cited page in MLA format assessed with a rubric and checklist.

2.10 Write samples of a wide variety of rhetorical patterns.

*2, 3

1; 2

Submitted essays and research papers using various rhetorical patterns following prescribed rubric for each pattern.

 

 

2.11 Revise as necessary to produce written work predominately free from grammatical and mechanical errors.

 

   

 

3

 

 

1; 2

 

 

Submitted drafts for peer review and instructor evaluation as assessed by a revision checklist.

2.12 Produce two (2) substantive research papers that demonstrate the skills identified in outcomes 2.1-2.11 in each of the areas of humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences.

2, 3, 6

1; 2; 3

 

Produce two (2)  research papers in any of the rhetorial patterns which follow a prescribed rubric in the areas of humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences.

CSLO (General) 3. Establish and defend a position in an argumentative research paper.

Student Learning Outcomes (specific)

ISLO

PSLO

Assessment Strategies

3.1 Engage in concession and refutation of specific ideas to develop a thoughtful response to controversial material.

2, 3

1; 2

Produce one (1) argumentative research paper as assessed by a rubric.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

             

COURSE CONTENT:

  •       Rhetorical patterns
  •       Research methods
  •       Summarizing, paraphrasing, and note-taking skills
  •       Outlining
  •       Thesis development and argumentation
  •       MLA format
    • Writing research papers in the fields of Social Sciences, Humanities, and Natural Sciences

METHOD(S) OF INSTRUCTION:

[x] Lecture             [ ] Cooperative learning groups

[x] Laboratory        [x] In-class exercises

[x] Audiovisual      [ ] Demonstrations

[x] Other:  (Guest Lecturers, Library Personnel)

REQUIRED TEXT(S) AND COURSE MATERIALS:

  • Veit, Richard, Christopher Gould, and Kathleen Gould. Writing, Reading, and Research. 9th  ed. Stamford: Cengage Learning, 2014. Print. (or most current edition)

REFERENCE MATERIALS:

  • None

INSTRUCTIONAL COSTS:

  • None

EVALUATION:

  • Final assessment is based on the summative production of three complete research papers.  They need to be from three (3) different disciplines, and one (1) has to be argumentative.

11) CREDIT BY EXAMINATION:

  • None

 

EN 120b Expository Writing II Endorsed by CC:9/21/2020
  Approved by VPIA: 9/21/2020

 

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