ED/PY-300 Education Psychology

Course Description:  This course provides elementary teachers with skills and knowledge regarding student characteristics and individual differences, theories of learning and motivation, the design of instruction, and assessment of learning in a local classroom setting.

  • Prerequisite Course(s): Acceptance into third year program ED/PY 201 Human Grown and Development

A.  PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES (PLOS):
      The student will be able to:
      1.  Demonstrate comprehension and application of the FSM elementary school
      curriculum standards.
 2.  Apply a variety of teaching approaches to meet learning needs of FSM elementary
      school students.
 3.  Assess and evaluate learning of the elementary student at both the formative and
      summative levels.
 4.  Organize and manage an elementary classroom environment for learning.
 5.  Demonstrate comprehension and application of learning theories and principles,
      human development, language development, educational foundations, sociocultural
      issues, technology, and strategies for teaching students with special needs.
 6.  Demonstrate professionalism.

 B.  STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (SLOs) – GENERAL:
      The student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate understanding of student characteristics and individual differences as

     defined by theories of the development of cognition, language development, moral
development, and personality and their implications for teaching and learning in the
local elementary classroom.
2.  Demonstrate understanding of theories of learning, intelligence, and motivation and
the application of each to teaching and learning in the local elementary classroom.  
3.  Write measurable instructional objectives, differentiate among the levels of
Bloom’s taxonomy of the cognitive domain, and analyze instructional tasks as the
basis for design of instruction.
4.  Be familiar with basic concepts in classroom assessment including interpretation of
standardized test results.

SLO

PLO 1

PLO 2

PLO 3

PLO 4

PLO 5

PLO 6

1

 

D

 

 

M

 

2

 

D

 

 

M

 

3

D

 

 

 

M

 

4

 

 

I

 

 

 

I = Introduced
D = Demonstrated
M = Mastered

  C.  STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (SLOs) – SPECIFIC:
The student will be able to:

General SLO 1. Demonstrate understanding of student characteristics and individual differences as defined by theories of the development of cognition, language development, moral development, and personality and their implications for teaching and learning in the       local elementary classroom.

Student Learning Outcomes

Assessment Strategies

1.1 Demonstrate understanding of the theories of Piaget, Vygotsky, and Erikson and the implications of these theories for teaching and learning in local elementary classrooms.

Student passes a test on Piaget, Vygotsky, and Erikson which includes objective items and essay items on the implications of these theories for teaching and learning in local classrooms. The essay items are scored with a rubric.

1.2 Demonstrate understanding of Kohlberg’s theory of moral development and its implications for teaching and learning in the local elementary classroom.

Given two moral dilemmas that might be faced by local elementary students, student states in writing how an elementary student might respond to each dilemma at each of the first four stages of Kohlberg’s theory of moral development. Student also summarizes at least two implications of Kohlberg’s theory for the local elementary classroom scored with a rubric.

1.3 Demonstrate understanding of the basic elements of language and the stages of language development. Summarize four theories of language development including behavioral, social cognitive, nativist, and sociocultural and provide an implication for each theory for teaching and learning in the local elementary classroom.

Student completes an exam on which he/she summarizes the basic philosophies of language development including behavioral, social cognitive, nativist, and sociocultural theories and provides an implication for each theory for teaching and learning in the local elementary classroom. The exam also includes objective test items on the elements of language and the stages of language development.

 General SLO 2. Demonstrate understanding of theories of learning, intelligence, and motivation and the application of each to teaching and learning in the local elementary classroom.

Student Learning Outcomes

Assessment Strategies

2.1 Distinguish between examples of classical and operant conditioning and state the implications of each for teaching and learning in a local elementary classroom.

Given 10 examples of situations from local classrooms on a written exam, student labels each as either classical or operant conditioning, provides a rationale for the label, and states the implications of each for teaching and learning in a local elementary classroom.

2.2 Apply principles of behavior modification to problem situations in a local elementary classroom.

Given five descriptions of problem situations in a local elementary classroom, student designs a plan for addressing each using the principles of reinforcement, punishment (use of logical consequences), extinction, and shaping.

2.3 Summarize in writing Bandura’s theory of social cognitive learning and its implications for teaching and learning in the local elementary classroom.

Student writes a paper on Bandura’s theory of social cognitive learning and its implications for teaching and learning in the local elementary classroom to be scored with a rubric.

2.4 Label the critical components of the information processing model of memory on a diagram, demonstrate understanding of these components, and summarize implications of the model for teaching and learning in the local elementary classroom.

Student labels the critical components of the information processing model of memory on a blank diagram, completes objective test items regarding these components, and discusses in writing at least two implications of the model for teaching and learning in the local elementary classroom on an exam. 

2.5 Define intelligence, explain the term IQ and its derivation, describe contents of commonly used IQ tests, summarize Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences, and develop and support a position on whether IQ tests developed outside of the FSM should be used in local elementary classrooms.

Student defines intelligence in his/her own words, explains Intelligence Quotient and its derivation, describes contents of commonly used IQ tests, and supports a position on whether IQ tests developed outside of the FSM should be used in local elementary classrooms on a written exam to be scored with a rubric.

2.6 Demonstrate understanding of the behavioristic, humanistic, and cognitive views of motivation including the implications of each for teaching and learning in a local elementary classroom.

 Student completes objective items on an exam on the behavioristic, humanistic, and cognitive views of motivation including the implications for teaching and learning in a local elementary classroom.

General SLO 3. Write measurable instructional objectives, differentiate among the levels of Bloom’s taxonomy of the cognitive domain, and analyze instructional tasks for the design of instruction.   

Student Learning Outcomes

Assessment Strategies

3.1 Write measurable instructional objectives based on FSM and State curriculum standards and benchmarks.

Student writes measurable objectives for 10 FSM or State curriculum benchmarks in the areas of language arts, science, math, social science, and reading on an exam. Each objective must contain a learner, conditions, a measurable verb, and a criterion for minimal performance.

 

3.2 Differentiate among the levels of Bloom’s taxonomy of the cognitive domain.

Given a list of 10 instructional objectives, student designates the level of Bloom’s taxonomy of the cognitive domain for each.

3.3 Analyze instructional tasks listing the primary subtasks in the order in which they should be learned.

Given a list of five instructional tasks, student task analyzes each task listing the specific skills required in an appropriate sequence for teaching. Each list is to be evaluated in terms of its completeness and sequence of subtasks as scored on rubrics.

General SLO 4. Be familiar with basic concepts in classroom assessment including interpretation of standardized test results.


Student Learning Outcomes

Assessment Strategies

 4.1  Compare and contrast norm-referenced  
and criterion-referenced tests, define the  
concepts of reliability and validity as related to assessment instruments, and  interpret grade level scores, percentile  ranks, and raw scores.

Student compares and contrasts norm-referenced and criterion-referenced tests, defines concepts of reliability and validity, and interprets grade level scores, percentile ranks, and raw scores on an exam. 

 4.2 Determine whether a test item is aligned with a given instructional objective and provide a rationale.

Given 10 instructional objectives and four test items for each, student selects item which is best aligned with each objective and gives rationale for choice on an exam.

 

D.  COURSE CONTENT:
Piaget’s theory of development
Vygotsky’s theory of sociocultural development
Erikson’s theory of personality development
Kohlberg’s theory of moral development
Language development
Elements of language
Classical and operant conditioning
Principles of behavior modification
Bandura’s theory of social cognitive learning
Information processing model of memory
Theories of motivation
Intelligence
Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences
Writing measurable instructional objectives
Bloom’s taxonomy
Task analysis
Norm- and criterion-referenced testing
Reliability and validity in testing
Interpretation of the results of standardized tests
Alignment of test items with instructional objectives

E.   METHODS OF INSTRUCTION:
       Lecture/discussion
Demonstration
Cooperative group work
In-class exercises/activities
Required reading
Internet research

F.  REQUIRED TEXT(S) AND MATERIALS:
Eggen, P. & Kauchak, D. (2010). Educational psychology: windows on classrooms.
Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill (or most recent edition). 

G.  REFERENCE MATERIALS:
None
 
    H. INSTRUCTIONAL COSTS:
         None

     I.  EVALUATION:
None

        J.  CREDIT BY EXAMINATION:
             None

 

 

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