ED-215 Introduction to Exceptional Children

GENERAL INFORMATION:

Course title: ED215 Introduction to Exceptional Children

Campus: National, Kosrae, Chuuk, and Yap

Initiators: Alton Higashi and Abraham Rayphand

Date: February 17, 2018

Course description:

This course introduces the student to concepts of exceptionality. The course focuses on special education terminology and concepts, history of special education, laws governing individuals with ex-ceptionalities and implications for schools and communities, and categories of exceptionalities. The student observes an individual with special needs, interviews the family, and writes a report. Student professionalism is measured.

 

COURSE HOURS/CREDITS:

Hours per Week

No. of Weeks

 

Total Hrs

 

Sem. Credits

Lecture

3

x

16

48/16

=

3

Laboratory

x

=

Workshop

x

=

Total Semester

Credits

3












PURPOSE OF COURSE:

[ x ] Degree requirement

[ ] Degree elective

[ ] Certificate

[ ] Other

PREREQUISITES: EN 110, EN 120a

PSLOS OF OTHER PROGRAMS THIS COURSE MEETS:

PSLO#

Program

none

1) INSTITUTIONAL STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (Check all that apply)

[ ]

1. Effective oral communication: capacity to deliver prepared, purposeful presentations designed to increase knowledge, to foster understanding, or to promote change in the listeners’ attitudes, values, beliefs, or behaviors.

[ x ]

2. Effective written communication: development and expression of ideas in writing through work in many genres and styles, utilizing different writing technologies, and mixing texts, data, and images through iterative experiences across the curriculum.

[ ]

3. Critical thinking: a habit of mind characterized by the comprehensive exploration of issues, ideas, artifacts, and events before accepting or formulating an opinion or conclusion.

[ x ]

4. Problem solving: capacity to design, evaluate, and implement a strategy to answer an open-ended question or achieve a desired goal.

[ ]

5. Intercultural knowledge and competence: a set of cognitive, affective, and behavioral skills and characteristics that support effective and appropriate interaction in a variety of cul-tural contexts.

[ x ]

6. Information literacy: the ability to know when there is a need for information, to be able to identify, locate, evaluate, and effectively and responsibly use and share that information for the problem at hand.

[ x ]

7. Foundations and skills for life-long learning : purposeful learning activity, undertaken on an ongoing basis with the aim of improving knowledge, skills, and competence.

[ ]

8. Quantitative Reasoning: ability to reason and solve quantitative problems from a wide array of authentic contexts and everyday life situations; comprehends and can create sophisticated arguments supported by quantitative evidence and can clearly communicate those arguments in a variety of formats.

2) PROGRAM STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (PSLOs): The student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate basic knowledge and concepts related to elementary education;
  2. Task analyze FSM and State curriculum standards, develop lesson plans, deliver lessons using a variety of strategies, develop instructional materials, manage student behavior, and assess student learning in an elementary classroom; and
  3. Demonstrate professionalism.

3) COURSE STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (CSLOs) (General): The student will be able to:

  1. Explain key terms, concepts, and categories related to exceptionalities.
  2. Review the history of special education and describe the impact of special education laws, regulations, and community values on children with exceptionalities in the FSM.
  3. Describe approaches, procedures, and services in addressing the needs of children with excep-tionalities and in designing an Individualized Education Program.
  4. Observe and develop a report on a case study of exceptionality.

4) COURSE STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (CSLOs) (Specific): The student will be able to:

c

CSLO (General) 1: Explain key terms, concepts, and categories related to exceptionalities.

Student Learning Outcomes (specific)

ISLO

PSLO

Assessment Strategies

1.1 Define and recognize key terminology re-lated to special education.

1.2 Define and recognize categories of excep-tionalities, identified by IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act).

1.3 Identify types of exceptionalities, as well as common causes of each type, and characteristics or signs and symptoms associated with the exceptionalities found in the FSM.

1.4 Identify key IDEA principles that govern policies and services related to special education programs.

2,7

2,7

2,7

2,6,7

1

1

1

1,3

Objective Test on key terminology

Objective Test on IDEA categories of exceptionalities

Objective Test on types of exceptionalities

Objective Test on IDEA principles

CSLO (General) 2: Review the history of special education and describe the impact of special education laws, regulations, and community values on children with exceptionalities in the FSM.

Student Learning Outcomes (specific)

ISLO

PSLO

Assessment Strategies

2.1 Arrange significant events in the history of special education as a chronological timeline.

2.2 Describe ways in which special education programs derive from laws, regulations, and community values by past and current stake-holders.

2.3 Describe reasons for changes, as well as barriers to change, in past and current practices in how special education programs have been provided.

[NOTE: Barriers include people’s beliefs and perceptions of exceptionalities.]

2.4 Compare the requirements of IDEA with their applications in the FSM.

2

2

2

2,3

1,3

1,3

1,3

1,3

Graphic display of timeline

(to be scored by rubric)

Descriptive essay

(to be scored by rubric)

Descriptive essay

(to be scored by rubric)

Compare-and-contrast essay

(to be scored by rubric)

CSLO (General) 3: Describe approaches, procedures, and services in addressing the needs of children with exceptionalities and in designing an Individualized Education Program.

Student Learning Outcomes (specific)

ISLO

PSLO

Assessment Strategies

3.1 Outline the special education process, as required in an Individualized Education Program (IEP).

3.2 Discuss pre-referral intervention strategies.

3.3 Summarize IEP components, processes, team membership, and members’ roles.

3.4 Describe the IEP placement options from the Least Restrictive Environment to the Most Restrictive Environment.

3.5 Design a simulated IEP for a child with an exceptionality in the FSM.

2,6

2,6

2,6

2,6

2,4,6

1,2

1,2

1,2

1,2

2

Written checklist to identify procedures, processes, and ser-vices to be provided to a child with exceptionalities.

Descriptive essay

(to be scored by rubric)

Objective Test on IEP

Objective Test on IEP placement options

Written plan of operations based in IEP requirements

(to be scored by rubric)

CSLO (General) 4: Observe and develop a report on a case study of exceptionality.

Student Learning Outcomes (specific)

ISLO

PSLO

Assessment Strategies

4.1 With assistance of the State Department of Education’s Special Education Office, observe an individual with exceptionality and maintain accurate notes, including interviews with the individual’s family.

4.2 Write a report on observations and interviews, as described above.

2,6

2,4,6*

1,3

1,3

Activities checklist

(to be scored by instructor)

Report

(to be scored by instructor)

5) COURSE CONTENT:

Terminology in special education

History of special education

Special education laws and regulations

Categories of principles, procedures, and processes

Categories and types of exceptionalities

Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)

Individualized Education Program (IEP)

6) METHOD(S) OF INSTRUCTION:

[ x ] Lecture [ x ] Cooperative learning groups

[ ] Laboratory [ x ] In-class exercises

[ x ] Audio visual [ x ] Demonstrations

[ ] Other

7) REQUIRED TEXT(S) AND COURSE MATERIALS:

William L. Heward (2012). Exceptional Children: An Introduction to Special Education, 10th Edition (Pearson Education Limited). ISBN-13: 978-1292022024 (or most recent edition).

8) REFERENCE MATERIALS:

FSM Department of Health, Education and Social Affairs, National Division of Education (2000). Handbook of Special Education Procedures, Guidelines and Forms (revised).

John Mangefel and Mike Caldwell (2006). The History of Special Education in Micronesia (Quezon City, Philippines: Centralbooks Central Book Supply, Inc.). LOC: Pac.LC4001.M5M31 2006. (sometimes titled A Caroline Island Cultural Perspective on Disability)

David Werner (2009). Disabled Village Children: A Guide for Community Health Workers, Rehab-ilitation Workers, and Families, 2nd Edition. (Palo Alto, CA: The Hesperian Foundation). ISBN: 978-0942364064 (or most recent edition).

9) INSTRUCTIONAL COSTS : None.

10) EVALUATION : Comprehensive final exam, passing with at least 70% correct or a minimum C-. In addition, each student will produce a portfolio of written work. A professionalism rubric will be administered twice during the semester – at midterm and at the end of the semester.

11) CREDIT BY EXAMINATION : None.

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