Associate of Arts in Pre-Teacher Preparation -- Elementary (AY 2011-2012)

PROGRAM REVIEW

Associate of Arts in Pre-Teacher Preparation -- Elementary

    Program Learning Outcomes:

    1. Demonstrate basic knowledge of the foundations and concepts related to elementary education.
    2. Demonstrate familiarity with a variety of instruction strategies for elementary school students.
    3. Demonstrate basic knowledge in the following areas: art, communication, humanities, language, literature, science, and social sciences.

    Program Histrory

    In 1963 The Trust Territory of he Pacific Islands and the University of Hawaii created the Micronesian Teacher Education Center (MTEC) to provide in-service teacher training. MTEC began offering a pre-service associate of science degree program in teacher education in 1969. In 1970 MTEC became Community College of Micronesia (CCM). CCM added an in-service teacher education degree through the merging of the College’s extension program and the district teacher education centers in 1974. CCM was first accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges in 1978. In 1982 the Third-year Certificate of Achievement programs in Elementary and Special Education were added. In 1992 the FSM established COM-FSM as a public corporation, and in 1993 CCM became COM-FSM. Also in 1993, the Certificate of Achievement in Preschool Teacher Education was added. In 1994 the Third-year Certificate of Achievement in Related Services Assistant was added, followed by the Third-year Certificate of Achievement program in Educational Leadership Academy in 1995. In 1996 the Associate of Science Degree program in Early Childhood Education was approved. In 1998 an agreement was signed with the University of Guam (UOG) to establish a branch UOG campus at the National Campus to offer fourth-year courses in elementary education to enable students to earn their bachelor’s degree from UOG. This agreement was followed by a collaborative arrangement between COM-FSM and UOG to offer the fourth-year elementary education program. This arrangement is now known as the COM-FSM/UOG Partnership BA Program. In 2002 a Bachelor of Arts Degree program in Elementary Education was approved by the Board of Regents but the substantive change proposal for this degree program was not approved by WASC. In 2009 the Associate of Science Degree program in Teacher Education- Elementary was phased out and replaced by the Associate of Arts Degree program in Teacher Preparation. In 2011 this program was renamed the Associate of Arts in Pre-teacher Preparation- Elementary. During 2009-2011 the Associate Degree programs in Early Childhood and Special Education were "shelved" due to low enrollment.

    Program Description

    Originating as a teacher training institution, COM-FSM, through the Division of Education continues the task of bettering education in Micronesia. Programs are carefully designed to equip students with the necessary knowledge and skills to meet the challenges of teaching effectively in a culturally relevant manner. At present the college offers an Associate of Arts in Pre-Teacher Preparation -- Elementary and a Third-year Certificate of Achievement in Teacher Preparation – Elementary. The name of the AA program was changed from AA in Teacher Preparation – Elementary to AA in Pre-Teacher Preparation – Elementary to more accurately reflect the focus of this program. The AA-level program provides students with courses rich in content, theoretical foundations and an introduction to the teaching profession, while the Third-year program provides pre-service and in-service students with practical and methods courses to prepare them to meet the needs of students in the elementary classrooms in the FSM.

    Through a collaborative effort, the University of Guam offers the Partnership BA in Elementary Education at the National Campus making it possible for students to earn the UOG bachelor’s degree without leaving the FSM. The education associate degree and the third-year certificate program have been articulated to meet the requirements of the bachelor’s degree.

    Associate of Arts in Pre-Teacher Preparation -- Elementary

    Program Learning Outcomes

    Students completing the AA degree program in Pre-Teacher Preparation-Elementary will be expected to demonstrate the following competencies:

    1. Demonstrate basic knowledge of the foundations and concepts related to elementary education.
    2. Demonstrate familiarity with a variety of instructional strategies for elementary school students.
    3. Demonstrate basic knowledge in the following areas: art, communication, humanities, language, literature, math, science and social sciences.

    Program Course Matrix

    Courses

    Outcome 1

    Outcomes 2

    Outcomes 3

    AR 101

     

     

    I

    ED 210a

    I

    D,M

     

    ED 215

    I,D

     

     

    ED/PY 201

    I,D

     

     

    EN 200

     

     

    I

    EN 208

     

     

    I

    EN/CO 205

     

    I

    I,D

    ED292

    I

    I,D

    I,D

    MS/ED 210

    I

     

     

    Science w/lab

    I

     

    I

    SS 120

     

     

    I

    SS 125 or SS 170
    or SS 171

     

     

    I

    SS/PY 101

    I

     

    I

    The core courses for the AA degree in Teacher Preparation-Elementary cover different parts of the PLO content. The parts of the PLO content is introduced (I), developed (D) and Mastered (M) in different courses throughout the degree program.

    Program Admission Requirements:

    Admissions to the AA degree in Teacher Preparation is per the COM-FSM admissions policy as stated in the catalog.

    Third-year Certificate of Achievement in Teacher Preparation – Elementary

    Program Learning Outcomes:

    Students completing the Third-year Certificate of Achievement in Teacher Preparation- Elementary will be expected to demonstrate the following competencies:

    1. Demonstrate comprehension and application of the FSM elementary school curriculum standards.
    2. Apply a variety of teaching approaches to meet learning needs of FSM elementary school students.
    3. Assess and evaluate learning of the elementary student at both the formative and summative levels.
    4. Organize and manage an elementary classroom environment for learning.
    5. Demonstrate comprehension and application of learning theories and principles, human development, language development, educational foundations, socio cultural issues, technology and strategies for teaching students with special needs.
    6. Demonstrate professionalism.

    Program Course Matrix

    Courses

    Outcome 1

    Outcomes 2

    Outcomes 3

    Outcome 4

    Outcome 5

    Outcome 6

    ED/PY 300

    I

    I

    I

    I

    D,M

    D

    ED 301a

    I

    I

     

    I,D

    D

    D

    ED 301b

    I

    D

    I,D

     

    D

     

    ED 302

    D

    D

    I,D

    D

    D

    D

    ED 303

    D

    D

    I,D

    D

    D

    D

    ED 304

    D

    D

    I,D

    D

    D

    D

    ED 305

     

    D

     

     

    D

    D

    ED 330

     

    D

    I

    D

    D

    D

    ED 338

    D

    D

     

    D

    D

    D

    ED 392

    D,M

    D,M

    D,M

    D,M

    D,M

    D,M

    I = Introduced, D = developed and practiced with feedback, M = demonstrated at the mastery level appropriate for graduation

    Program Admissions Requirements:The admission policy for the Third-Year CA in Teacher Preparation-Elementary was modified in the spring of 2011 to read as follows:

    Admission Application Deadlines: Applications for admission to the third-year certificate program, along with entrance essays, must be submitted at least two weeks (10 working days) prior to the start date of an early registration period.

    Full Admission:  A student will be admitted with full status if he/she

        1. possesses an associate degree in education
        2. has earned a CumGPA of 2.75 or above
        3. has a score of at least 20 on the entrance essay with no individual score below a three

    Note:  Entrance essay is scored based on the COMET Rubric.

    Probationary Status: A student with the education associate degree may be admitted on probation if he/she

    1. has a minimum CumGPA of 2.5 and
    2. has a minimum score of 15 on the entrance essay with no individual score below a three (3)

    A student is required to take EN 220 Writing for Teachers if he/she has a score of 15-19 on the entrance essay or individual score of three (3) in Syntax and /or Vocabulary.

    Pre-requisite Courses: Students who enter the program without having completed ED 210a, ED 215, and/or ED/PY 201 need to complete these courses with a grade of ‘C’ or better during the first semester of the program.

    Removal from Probationary Status:The student may be removed from Probationary Status after the first semester of the third-year program if the student.
    1. successfully passes EN 220 Writing for Teachers and
    2. Earns a semester GPA of at least 2.75 (with no grade lower than a C) with a minimum of 15 credits.

    Should a student begin the program in the summer when 15 credit hours are impossible to attain, the same stipulation as above applies for the summer and fall semester combined (or the first two semesters in any combination) even if the course load in the respective semesters exceeds 15 credit hours.

    A three member subcommittee will represent the Division to review third-year applications along with the representatives from Admissions Board and RAR.

    There were several significant policy changes in the revised admission policy. Students are now required to have completed an AA or AS in education, excluding early childhood. Previously, students were admitted with a degree in any field. Deadlines have been established for applications. Also, clearer requirements for probationary status have been established including how to move to full admission status.

    “Shelved” Programs

    During the 2009 to 2011 period, the early childhood, related services, and special education programs have been “shelved” due to lack of enrollment. It should be noted that these programs can be “unshelved” should a need for one or more programs becomes evident and funding becomes available.

    Discontinuation of AA in Teacher Education Program/Extension of Third-year in Teacher Preparation Program.

    A letter proposing a change to the name Associate of Arts in Teacher Preparation program to Associate of Arts in Pre-Teacher Preparation was transmitted to the Vice President of Instructional Affairs on October 12, 2010. The name AA in Teacher Preparation has been misleading to the departments of education, assuming that students graduating from the program are ready to be in the work force. The Curriculum Committee acted on the proposal during its January 17, 2011 meeting and was approved by the president on March 17, 2011.

    Faculty/Staff

    The COM-FSM Division of Education has seven (7) full-time faculty, one (1) Coordinator for the UOG/COM-FSM BA Partnership Program, one (1) Peace Corps faculty, one (1) Computer Lab Assistant (on special contract), and one (1) clerk. As of this writing, the art instructor position is vacant.

    Paul Gallen

    Professor of Education B.A.,
    University of Guam M.Ed.,
    University of Hawaii
    paulg@comfsm.fm

    Dr. Richard Womack

    Professor of Education/Business
    B.A., University of California at Berkeley
    M.Ed./Ed.D., University of Nevada, Reno rwomack@comfsm.fm

    Magdalena Hallers

    Professor
    B.A., University of Guam M.Ed., University of Guam mhallers@comfsm.fm

     

    Susan Moses

    Professor
    B.S., University of Illinois
    M.Ed., University of Oregon smoses@comfsm.fm

     

    Robert Andreas

    Associate Professor
    B.A., University of Guam
    M.A., University of Hawaii, Manoa andreas@comfsm.fm

    Dr. Sven Mueller

    M.A., Free University, Berlin,
    Germany Ph.D., Indiana University, Bloomington

     

    Molly Peterson

    Peace Corps Volunteer/Instructor
    B.S., Saint Bonaventure University M.S., Saint Bonaventure University
    mollyp@comfsm.fm

    Sylvia Henry

    UOG/COM-FSM Partnership
    BA Coordinator A.A., College of Micronesia-FSM
    BA, University of Guam

    shenry@comfsm.fm

    Mason Tihpen

    Information System Specialist
    A.A., College of Micronesia-FSM
    B.A. E., University of Guam
    masotihp@comfsm.fm

     

    Josephine Kostka

    Administrative Assistant
    A.A. Community College of Micronesia josephine@comfsm.fm

     

     

     

    Health Indicators

    Program Enrollment

     

     

    Programs

    Fall 2010

    Spring 2011

     

    Total

    AS in Early Childhood Education

    4

    3

    7

    LA/Education

    0

    1

    1

    AA in Teacher Preparation

    350

    367

    717

    AS in Teacher Ed. Elementary

    350

    95

    445

    Third-year Teacher Preparation

    84

    74

    158

    Total Enrollment

    438

    445

    883

    Note: Enrollment data for summer is not available at OAR or IRPO.

    Graduation Outcome


    Programs                         Enrollment     Graduates     Graduates

     

    %

    AS in Early Childhood Education

    4

    0

    0%

    LA/Education

    0

    0

    0%

    AA in Teacher Preparation

    350

    8

    2%

    AS in Teacher Ed. Elementary

    144

    23

    16%

    Third-year Teacher Preparation

    84

    7

    8%

    Total

    578

    38

    6%



    Programs                         Enrollment     Graduates      Graduates

     

    %

    AS in Early Childhood Education

    3

    0

    0%

    LA/Education

    1

    0

    0%

    AA in Teacher Preparation

    367

    8

    2%

    AS in Teacher Ed. Elementary

    95

    26

    27%

    Third-year Teacher Preparation

    74

    11

    15%

    Total

    540

    45

    8%

    Average Class Size Overall Enrollment by
    Course


    Overall No. of Sections Offered


    Overall Average Class Size


    Fall   2010      Spring   2011      Fall   2010       Spring   2011        Fall   2010        Spring 2011
    335                    329                     19                       19                     17.63                    17.31

     

    Seat Cost (SY2010-11)

     

    Division

    Student
    seats

     

    Credits

    Obsolete cost
    data

    Credits per
    seat

     

    Seat cost

    Education

    718

    2,154

    $226,170.00

    3

    $105.00

    fall 2010 course completion rate/Course Completion Rate (Pass/Fail)


    Fall 2010

     

    Course

    Campus

    A

     

    B

    C

    D

    F

    W

    I

    Total     Pass (³D)

    Fail

    Pass%

    Fail%

    AR 101

    National

    4

     

    4

    6

    3

    1

    0

    0

    18          17

    1

    94%

    6%

    ED 210a

    National

    2

     

    19

    8

    6

    0

    0

    0

    35          35

    0

    100%

    0%

    ED 215

    National

    5

     

    7

    9

    1

    4

    0

    0

    26          22

    4

    85%

    15%

    ED/PY 201

    National

    1

     

    8

    6

    7

    5

    0

    0

    27          22

    5

    81%

    19%

    ED292

    National

    12

     

    8

    8

    0

    0

    0

    0

    28          28

    0

    100%

    0%

    MS/ED 210

    National

    1

     

    11

    10

    0

    2

    0

    0

    24          22

    2

    92%

    8%

    ED/PY 300

    National

    5

     

    10

    0

    2

    0

    0

    0

    17          17

    0

    100%

    0%

    ED 301a

    National

    7

     

    14

    1

    0

    1

    0

    0

    23          23

    0

    100%

    0%

    ED 301b

    National

    12

     

    5

    0

    0

    1

    0

    1

    19          18

    1

    95%

    5%

    ED 302

    National

    12

     

    5

    4

    0

    1

    0

    0

    22          22

    0

    100%

    0%

    ED 303

    National

    10

     

    10

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    20          20

    0

    100%

    0%

    ED 304

    National

    9

     

    7

    1

    0

    0

    0

    0

    17          17

    0

    100%

    0%

    ED 305

    National

    1

     

    13

    3

    0

    0

    0

    0

    17          17

    0

    100%

    0%

    ED 330

    National

    7

     

    10

    1

    0

    1

    0

    0

    19          18

    1

    95%

    5%

    ED 338

    National

    2

     

    1

    8

    1

    2

    0

    0

    14          12

    2

    86%

    14%

    ED 392

    National

    6

     

    2

    1

    0

    0

    0

    0

    9           9

    0

    100%

    0%

     

    Total:

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    335         319

    16

    95%

    5%

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Spring 2011

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Course

    Campus

    A

    B

    C

    D

    F

    W

    I

    Total

    Pass   (³D) Fail

    Pass%

    Fail%

     

    ED 210a

    National

    10

    7

    5

    3

    1

    0

    0

    26

    25        1

    96%

    4%

     

    ED 215

    National

    3

    5

    11

    3

    2

    0

    0

    24

    22        2

    92%

    8%

     

    ED/PY 201

    National

    1

    7

    12

    3

    1

    0

    0

    24

    23        1

    96%

    4%

     

    ED292

    National

    13

    15

    4

    2

    0

    0

    2

    36

    34        2

    94%

    6%

     

    MS/ED 210

    National

    6

    10

    11

    0

    0

    0

    0

    27

    27        0

    100%

    0%

     

    ED/PY 300

    National

    0

    3

    2

    4

    2

    0

    0

    11

    9        2

    82%

    18%

     

    ED 301a

    National

    7

    9

    2

    2

    0

    0

    0

    20

    20        0

    100%

    0%

     

    ED 301b

    National

    11

    4

    1

    0

    1

    0

    0

    17

    16        1

    94%

    6%

     

    ED 302

    National

    6

    6

    5

    2

    2

    0

    0

    21

    19        2

    90%

    10%

     

    ED 303

    National

    14

    7

    1

    1

    0

    0

    0

    23

    23        0

    100%

    0%

     

    ED 304

    National

    3

    9

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    12

    12        0

    100%

    0%

     

    ED 305

    National

    10

    7

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    17

    17        0

    100%

    0%

     

    ED 330

    National

    11

    12

    1

    1

    1

    0

    0

    26

    25        1

    96%

    4%

     

    ED 338

    National

    3

    7

    6

    3

    0

    0

    0

    19

    19        0

    100%

    0%

     

    ED 392

    National

    11

    10

    5

    0

    0

    0

    0

    26

    26        0

    100%

    0%

     

     

    Total:

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    329

    317      12

    96%

    4%

     

     Students’ Satisfaction Rate

    The table below summarizes the number of graduates per campus since fall 2010. Most of the graduates with an Associate degree continue their enrollment in the Third-Year Certificate of Achievement program while those who graduate from the Third-year Certificate of Achievement in Teacher Preparation-Elementary program continue enrollment in the Partnership BA in Elementary Education program offered at the National Campus. Since spring 2009 to spring 2011semester, thirty-eight (38) students have graduated from the Partnership program. Currently, a total of seventeen (17) students are enrolled in the program.

    Graduation Rate Fall 2010 & Spring 2011
    Graduation rate fall 2010 Teacher prepGraduate by Program


    Program                                                                 No. of Graduates

    AS in Early Childhood Education

    0

    LA/Education

    0

    AA in Teacher Preparation

    16

    AS in Teacher Ed. Elementary

    49

    Third-year Teacher Preparation

    18

    Total

    83

    Transfer data

    Only the students who graduated from the programs at National Campus are being tracked. The tables below show the number of students from fall 2010 and spring 2011 who continue on with our third-year program; the Partnership BA in Elementary Education Program; and/or went straight back to work after receiving a degree. Those who went back to work are in-service teachers from Pohnpei DOE who need to get their associate degree as required by the FSM Certification.

    AA Degree Graduates

     

    Student

    Semester Graduated

     

    State

     

    Status

    1

    Fall 2010

    Pohnpei

    Continue in Third Year CA

    2

    Fall 2010

    Pohnpei

    Continue in Third Year CA

    3

    Fall 2010

    Pohnpei

    Continue in Third Year CA

    4

    Fall 2010

    Pohnpei

    Continue in Third Year CA

    5

    Fall 2010

    Pohnpei

    Continue in Third Year CA

    6

    Fall 2010

    Pohnpei

    Continue in Third Year CA

    7

    Fall 2010

    Pohnpei

    Continue in Third Year CA

    8

    Fall 2010

    Yap

    Continue in Third Year CA

    9

    Spring 2011

    Pohnpei

    Continue in Third Year CA

    10

    Spring 2011

    Pohnpei

    Continue in Third Year CA

    11

    Spring 2011

    Pohnpei

    Continue in Third Year CA

    12

    Spring 2011

    Pohnpei

    In-service (Continue in Third Year CA)


    13

    Spring 2011

    Pohnpei

    In-service (Continue in Third Year CA)

    14

    Spring 2011

    Pohnpei

    Continue in Third Year CA

    15

    Spring 2011

    Pohnpei

    Continue in Third Year CA

    16

    Spring 2011

    Pohnpei

    Continue in Third Year CA

    During fall 2010 and spring 2011, 18 students graduated from the TYC in Teacher Preparation- Elementary program.

    Third-Year Graduates

     

    Student

    Semester Graduated

     

    State

     

    Status

    1

    Fall 2010

    Pohnpei

    In-service (Continue in UOG & COM-FSM BA)

    2

    Fall 2010

    Pohnpei

    Continue in UOG & COM-FSM BA

    3

    Fall 2010

    Yap

    Continue in UOG & COM-FSM BA

    4

    Fall 2010

    Yap

    Continue in UOG & COM-FSM BA

    5

    Fall 2010

    Pohnpei

    Working at Seinwar Elem. School

    6

    Fall 2010

    Marshall Islands

    Continue in UOG & COM-FSM BA

    7

    Fall 2010

    Pohnpei

    Continue in UOG & COM-FSM BA

    8

    Spring 2011

    Kosrae

    Continue in UOG & COM-FSM BA

    9

    Spring 2011

    Yap

    Continue in UOG & COM-FSM BA

    10

    Spring 2011

    Pohnpei

    In-service (Continue in UOG & COM-FSM BA)

    11

    Spring 2011

    Yap

    Continue in UOG & COM-FSM BA

    12

    Spring 2011

    Pohnpei

    In-service (Continue in UOG & COM-FSM BA)

    13

    Spring 2011

    Pohnpei

    Continue in UOG & COM-FSM BA

    14

    Spring 2011

    Pohnpei

    Continue in UOG & COM-FSM BA

    15

    Spring 2011

    Kosrae

    In Kosrae

    16

    Spring 2011

    Pohnpei

    Continue in UOG & COM-FSM BA

    17

    Spring 2011

    Pohnpei

    Continue in UOG & COM-FSM BA

    18

    Spring 2011

    Pohnpei

    Continue in UOG & COM-FSM BA

     

    Learning Outcome Assessment

    Program Learning Outcome (PLO) Level: The parts of the PLO content is introduced (I), developed (D) and Mastered (M) in different courses throughout the degree program.

    Course

    PLO#

    I, D, M

    Reflection/Comments

    AR 101

    3

    I

     

    ED 210a

    1, 2

    I, D, M

    Number of students: N=25 (Spring 2011)

    Recommendations:
    Relate all Final Examination Question to the appropriate CLO and break this out in CLO Groups for evaluation of course.
    The ED210 course outline should now reflect the introduction to teaching as an entry course into the profession and should be welcomed.

    ED 215

    1

    I, D

    Number of students: N=24 (Spring 2011)


     

     

     

     

    Recommendations:

    1. Course outline/syllabus needs to be updated to match textbook used.
    2. Changes need to be made to some student learning outcomes (such as 2.b., 2.c., & 2.d). Instead of having them as separate student learning outcomes-combine them.
    3. Rewrite and combine slo 4 and 5; disability by disability to match textbook (recommend. From previous course assessments).
    4. Need to have to separate checkouts for visual impairments and hearing impairments (as recommended before) or give more activities and time for discussing topics before checkout.
    5. Include video viewing and observations of individual’s with disabilities to better understand the different categories/types of disabilities.
    6. Include a slo for a final project on different types of health impairments and disabilities.
    7. Continue to work with state campuses on the common assessments.
    8. Recommendations from ED215 students:
      1. More group work.
      2. More time, more examples, and more activities (role play, simulations, etc.).
      3. Slow down and provide more time to study.
      4. To include more assignments than tests and quizzes.

    ED/PY 201

    2

    I, D

    Number of students: N=24 (Spring 2011)
    Recommendations:

    1. Changes need to be made to most student learning outcomes and suggested assessment strategies (#2- 4: too specific).
    2. Written checkouts should be for each chapter only (Chapters 11 & 12).
    3. Rewrite student learning outcome numbers 4 & 5 –topics on developmental issues (individual projects).
    4. Include SLO for the first chapter (introduction).
    5. Include a final project (developmental issues) for the course.
    6. Align course outline/syllabus with chapters of textbook (already recommended in previous course assessments).
    7. Develop course outline and work with state campuses for the common assessments.

    Additional observations:

    1. One student received an “A” letter grade.
    2. Students with more absences failed to turn in course work.

     

    Special comments: explanations on course grading, opportunities to achieve outcomes, how many students receive an A, B, C, etc.

     

     

     

    1.   A = 1

    1. B = 7 Students
    2. C = 11 Students
    3. D = 4 Student
    4. F = 1 Student

    ED 292

    1, 2, & 3

    I, D

    Number of students: N=36 (Spring 2011)

    MS/ED 210

    PLO

    I

    Number of students: N=27 (Spring 2011)

    Science w/lab

    1

    I

     

    SS    125    or
    SS   170    or
    SS 171

    3

    I

     

    SS/PY 101

    1 & 3

    I

     

    Course

    PLO

    I, D, M

    Reflection/Comments

    ED/PY 300

    1-6

    I, D

    Final Grades: 3 Bs, 2 Cs, 4 Ds, and 2 Fs.

    Comments: Needless to say, I wish I could start all over again with this class. After the slow start and the devastating test results, I thought we should spend as much time as we needed on each topic. As the course went on, however, the students seemed to rely on the fact that we would sometimes even read the passages together if no one volunteered to move the class discussion along, which made us lose much needed time.

    ED 301b

    1-3, 5-6

    I, D

    Number of students: N=17 (Spring 2011)

    Special comment: If a student scored below 70% on a paper or quiz on the first try, s/he was given a chance to do a make-up.
    However, per the course policy, the highest score a student could earn on the second try was 70%. To get students to come to class on time and read the assignment in the textbook, bonus quizzes were given throughout the course. These quizzes were given only during the first five minutes of class and appeared to motivate students to come to class on time. The quizzes were open book so the skill actually being tested was their ability to scan. According to the Best Practices instructor, scanning is a valuable skill that the students should learn. This practice will be continued this summer and next fall.

    Final grades: 11 As; 4 Bs; 1 C; and   1 F.  The student who earned the C is a very capable student who attended class regularly but simply failed to submit assignments in a timely manner. Points were deducted for lateness,  and this seriously affected her grade.

     

     

     

    The student earning the F stopped attending class towards the latter part of the semester. No reason was given for this action.

    Recommendations for improving ED/PY 301b: The recommendations for improvement of this course have been highlighted under the discussions above. In addition, to earn bonus points this semester students were asked to submit a reflection paper summarizing at least three ways to improve the course.
    Suggestions offered by the students include: visit the schools; extend the class time; rethink the peer evaluations of teaching demonstrations; have students teach real students; do not allow students to submit late assignments; do not allow students to come to class late;  give students more work on the weekends; do not give so many assignments; spend more time on writing lesson objectives; have students share their translated assignments with each other; bonus quizzes should be from closed books; have students deliver their translated lessons to the entire class; provide more time for assignments that have to be typed, and have a bigger classroom space. All of these suggestions will be taken into consideration when planning lessons and activities for the summer and fall 2011 semesters.

    As recommended on the Fall 2010 course level assessment report for this course, a direct link to the FSM Standards and Benchmarks was included with each SLO on the Spring 2011 syllabus. This practice will be continued each semester. Beginning with the summer 2011 semester, a more concerted effort will be made to develop lesson objectives from the standards and benchmarks.

    ED 302

    1-6

    I, D

    Number of students: N=21 (Spring 2011)

    Suggestions for Improvement:

    1. We need to be clearer on the respective weigh of content and methods. Since the course had methods in its title, I emphasized methods, learning half-way during the semester it is actually content, content, and, again, content that needs to be emphasized.
    2. We also need to pick a different, more appropriate book (for elementary Social Studies).

    ED 330

    2-6

    I, D

    Number of students: N=26 (Spring 2011)

    Special comment: If a student scored below 70% on a paper or quiz on the first try, s/he was given a chance to do a make-up.
    However, per the course policy, the highest score a student could earn on the second try was 70%. Several opportunities to earn bonus points were provided during the course. To get students to come to class on time and read the assignment in the textbook, bonus quizzes were given throughout the course. These quizzes were given only during the first five minutes of class and appeared

     

     

     

    to motivate students to come to class on time. The quizzes were open book so the skill actually being tested was their ability to scan. According to the Best Practices instructor, scanning is a valuable skill that the students should learn. This practice will be continued this summer and next fall.

    Recommendations for improving ED 330: Areas needing special attention for the spring 2011 semester are highlighted above in bold and/or discussed. Students were required to submit a reflection paper summarizing three recommendations for improving the course. Some of these recommendations are included in the discussions above. Other recommendations focused primarily on general orchestration of the course rather than specific SLOs and included the following: arrange for at least one visit to a local classroom (3 students suggested this), schedule the course for the morning, rethink the way peers evaluate in-class checkouts, have more quizzes, have more role-play activities, do not allow students to be late to class, do not accept work that is submitted late, do not give so many bonus opportunities, wait until everyone is in class and then give the bonus quiz, give partial credit when students only meet part of a bonus requirement, play more games, type the lesson plan and place it in everyone’s folder (The lesson plan is usually written on the board ahead of class.), have more quizzes and tests, include more group presentations, extend the time go to the elementary classrooms to observe, do not extend due dates, do more demonstrations, include how to set up a grading system, obtain written feedback from students, give extra work on the weekends, make tests more difficult, and arrange for a bigger space.

    The instructor also had the opportunity to attend two (2) FSM education conferences in October and November. It was learned that the FSM school accreditation standards include a classroom observation and criteria for acceptable classroom management. Links to these standards were incorporated in the spring 2011 ED 330 course syllabus, and copies of the accreditation instruments were included in the student activity booklet that accompanies this course. The instructor will continue to make a direct link between ED 330 and the FSM school accreditation standards.

    ED 338

    1-6

    D, M

    Number of Students N=19 Special comments:
    A = 3 Student B = 7 Students C = 6 Students D = 3 Students F = 0 Student

     

     

     

    Recommendations:

    Course outline needs to be updated to match textbook used. Student learning outcomes need to be organized for easier assessment.
    Change some SLOs that are very outdated and not based on current studies.
    Align course outline/syllabus with chapters of textbook. Include SLO using the National Curriculum Standards (NCS)- linking SLOs & NCS with accommodations.

    ED 392

    1-6

    D, M

    Number of students N=26 (Spring 2011)

    Recommendations:

    1. Revise text
    2. Add technology to PLO #
    3. Submit new course outline
    4. Schedule class time to allow for travel and one day lab together and administering lesson assessments
    5. Devise an assessment procedure that allows for assessing student knowledge in the FSM and State curriculum content areas particularly the course in the General Education core.

    The summaries above were provided by the faculty who taught the courses during fall 2010 and spring 2011. The details of the SLO assessments for each of the courses summarized above are attached as Appendix A to this report.

    The attempt to obtain SLO assessment of the other courses listed in the major requirements of the AA degree in Teacher Preparation-Elementary did not get materialized because each instructional division at the National Campus will submit their own SLO assessment to the VPIA office for analysis.

    SY 2010-11 Assessment Plan

    Evaluation questions

    Data sources

    Sampling

    Analysis

    Do our students possess pedagogical

    FSM Teacher

    All entering 3rd

    Comparison of cohort

    content knowledge?

    Competency

    Year; all

    scores with FSM

     

    Exam

    completing 3rd &

    certification standards

     

     

    4th Year students

    & item analysis

    Do our students possess subject-area

    FSM-NSTT

    All entering 3rd

    Compare students’

    content (reading, writing, math and

     

    Year; all

    scores with FSM

    science) knowledge?

     

    completing 3rd &

    Certification Standards.

     

     

    4th Year students

     

    Are the students able to plan, deliver,

    Common

    All students

    Compare student

    and assess a lesson in a peer teaching,

    observation

    enrolled in ED

    performance across

    role play situation?

    instrument

    292

    campuses for

     

    across all

     

    competency and

     

    campuses

     

    consistency.

    Are the students able to plan, deliver,

    Common

    All students

    Compare student

    and assess a lesson in a local

    observation

    enrolled in ED

    performance across

    elementary classroom?

    instrument

    392

    campuses for

     

    across all

     

    competency and

     

    campuses

     

    consistency.

    Have students become familiar with

    Common

    All students

    Compare student

    basic education terminology, basic

    assessment

    enrolled in ED

    performance across

    teaching methods, basic principles of

    instrument

    210a

    campuses for

    assessment, classroom management,

    across all

     

    competency and

    and lesson planning?

    campuses

     

    consistency.

    Are the students able to identify and

    Common

    All students

    Compare student

    differentiate the different disability

    assessment

    enrolled in ED

    performance across

    conditions?

    instrument

    215

    campuses for

     

    across all

     

    competency and

     

    campuses

     

    consistency.

    Are the students able to demonstrate

    Common

    All students

    Compare student

    understanding of the physical,

    assessment

    enrolled in

    performance across

    cognitive, and social/emotional

    instrument

    ED/PY 201

    campuses for

    development of  children and youth

    across all

     

    competency and

    from birth through adolescent stage?

    campuses

     

    consistency.

    Are the students able to fulfill the role

    ED 492/498

    All students

    Analyze student

    of a teacher in a local classroom for

    INTASC

    enrolled in ED

    performance levels

    an entire semester?

    rubrics and

    492/ 498

    (distinguished,

     

    showcase

     

    proficient, basic, &

     

    portfolio

     

    unsatisfactory) using

     

     

     

    the INTASC rubrics.

    Timeline

    Activity

    Who is Responsible?

    Date

    Teacher Competency Exam for all students

    Professors: Moses, Hallers, & Gallen

    End of fall 2010& end of spring 2011

    NSTT Content Exams for all students

    Professors: Womack & Andreas via help of NDOE

    End of fall 2010& end of spring 2011

    ED 292 for all students in ED292

    Dr. Womack

    End of fall 2010& end of spring 2011

    ED 392 for all students in ED 392

    Dr. Womack

    End of fall 2010& end of spring 2011

    ED 210a for all students enrolled in ED 210a

    Dr. Womack

    End of fall 2010 & end of spring 2011

    ED 215 for all students enrolled in ED 215

    Prof. Hallers

    End of fall 2010 & end of spring 2011

    ED/PY 201 for all students enrolled in ED/PY 201

    Prof. Hallers

    End of fall 2010 & end of spring 2011

    ED 492/498 for all 4th Year graduates

    Ed. Div. faculty

    End of fall 2010 &end of spring 2011

    Report on Evaluation Question #1 on School Year 2010-2011 Division of Education Program Assessment Plan.

    The first evaluation question on the 2010-2011 Division of Education assessment plan is: Do our students possess pedagogical content knowledge? This question was to be evaluated by a review of FSM Teacher Competency Exam (TCE) data for all entering and completing third- and fourth- year students. Such review was to include a comparison of cohort scores with FSM certification standards and an item analysis of performance on the exam.

    FSM Teacher Competency Exam Results. During this past year, the FSM Department of Education officially adopted the COM-FSM competency exam as a component of the National Standardized Test for Teachers (NSTT). The test consists of 100 multiple-choice items, 75 of which target competencies addressed in the third-year program and 25 of which target competencies addressed in the fourth-year program. A score of 53 out of the first 75 items (70%) was established as the bottom cut-off score for certification at the Basic level. Fourth-year students were administered all 100 items, while third-year students were administered only the first 75. Three (3) students in the December 2010 third-year cohort completed all 100 items. It was decided to test students only when they completed the third- and fourth-year programs to avoid students learning from the test due to multiple administrations of the same instrument.

    Table No. 1 below summarizes the scores of the December 2010 and May 2011 graduates. Of the 17 third-year graduates, 15 students took the exam. (Although signs were posted announcing the test administration, one (1) December 2010 graduate and one (1) May 2011 graduate failed to take the exam.) Of the 15 third-year graduates, only eight (8) scored 53 or higher. The highest score achieved was 60, while three (3) students scored 53. An additional three (3) students scored between 50-52. Two students scored only 40 on the exam. These scores are consistent with the performance of the students in the third-year courses.

    Of the seven (7) fourth-year graduates, four (4) passed the exam considering only the first 75 questions. If all 100 questions are considered, however, only one (1) student achieved a score of 70% or higher.

    It should be noted that the names and scores of students who passed the exam will be forwarded to the FSM Department of Education and recorded for certification purposes. According to FSM DOE policy, a student/teacher may attempt to pass the exam three (3) times.

    Table No. 1 Teacher Competency Test Scores for December 2010 and May 2011 Third-year and Fourth-year Graduates

     

    Student

     

    Program

    Graduation Cohort

    Score on first 75 items

    Score on entire 100 items

    TY #1

    Third-year

    December 2010

    40

    49

    TY #2

    Third-year

    December 2010

    51

    N/A

    TY #3

    Third-year

    December 2010

    54

    67

    TY #4

    Third-year

    December 2010

    42

    N/A

    TY #5

    Third-year

    December 2010

    Did not take

    N/A

    TY #6

    Third-year

    December 2010

    59

    75

    TY #7

    Third-year

    May 2011

    53

    N/A

    TY #8

    Third-year

    May 2011

    60

    N/A

    TY #9

    Third-year

    May 2011

    43

    N/A

    TY #10

    Third-year

    May 2011

    40

    N/A

    TY #11

    Third-year

    May 2011

    Did not take

    N/A

    TY #12

    Third-year

    May 2011

    49

    N/A

    TY #13

    Third-year

    May 2011

    52

    N/A

    TY #14

    Third-year

    May 2011

    53

    N/A

    TY #15

    Third-year

    May 2011

    58

    N/A

    TY #16

    Third-year

    May 2011

    53

    N/A

    TY #17

    Third-year

    May 2011

    57

    N/A

     

     

     

     

     

    BA #1

    BA

    December 2010

    60

    68

    BA #2

    BA

    December 2010

    67

    85

    BA #3

    BA

    December 2010

    55

    65

    BA #4

    BA

    December 2010

    57

    68

    BA #5

    BA

    December 2010

    50

    58

    BA #6

    BA

    December 2010

    49

    58

    BA #7

    BA

    May 2011

    46

    57

    Item analysis of the results. The second part of assessment question #1 requires an item analysis of the performance of students on the FSM TCE. The primary topic of each
    TCE item is listed in Table No. 2 below along with the number of students who missed each item. Items missed by 30% or more of the students are highlighted in bold type. These results will be shared with faculty in the Education Division so that areas of weakness may be addressed during this school year.

    Recommendations for improvement.

    1) Several years ago there were two additional parallel competency exams developed that are currently in draft stage. There is a need to finalize these exams so that students/teachers do not learn from repeatedly taking the same test. Discussions have begun with the FSM DOE in this regard.

    2) A study manual designed to prepare students/teachers to take the FSM TCE is scheduled to be completed in the next two weeks. This manual should be made available to all teachers and to students in the COM-FSM third- and fourth-year programs to enhance their performance on the exam.

    Question #4

    Showcase Portfolio: Final Presentation

    (5) Strong, convincing, and consistent evidence; quality reflection
    (3) Clear evidence and/or reflection&l
    (1) Limited evidence and/or limited reflection
    (0) No evidence and/or weak reflection

    INTASC Principle

    5

    4

    3

    1

    0

    1.   Understanding Content

    7

    0

    1

    0

    0

    2.   Understanding Development

    6

    1

    1

    0

    0

    3.   Understanding Differences

    4

    2

    1

    1

    0

    4.   Designing Instructional Strategies

    5

    1

    1

    1

    0

    5.   Understanding and Using Management Strategies and Motivation

    6

    1

    0

    1

    0

    6.   Communicating to Learners

    6

    1

    1

    0

    0

    7.   Planning Instruction and Using Integration

    6

    2

    0

    1

    0

    8.   Assessment of Student Learning

    5

    2

    0

    1

    0

    9.   Reflecting on Practice

    4

    3

    0

    1

    0

    10. Participating in Professional Community

    7

    0

    1

    0

    0

    Seven out of the eight teacher candidates graduated. One failed to graduate from the program resulting from inefficient teaching performance and lacking evidence of accomplishment of the INTASC principles.

     

    Conceptual Element/Category

     

    Performance Levels

    Unsatisfactory

    Basic

    Proficient

    Distinguished

     

    Is frequently late or

    Sometimes late or

    Late or absent once

    Is never late in class

     

    absent

    absent with valid

    with valid excuse

    or absent from class

     

     

    excuse

     

    (and other assigned

     

     

     

     

    activity)

     

     

    N=1

    N=8

    N=8

     

    Does not do the

    Completes all the

    Assigned tasks are

    Does the assigned

     

    assigned tasks

    tasks with some

    complete an well

    tasks very well;

     

    quite often

    reliance from others

    done; submits them

    completes and

     

     

    and sometimes

    on deadline date

    submits them before

     

     

    submits them late

     

    the deadline

     

     

    with valid reason.

     

     

    KS:

     

     

    N=10

    N=7

    Commitment to

    Is always defensive

    Accepts

    Accepts

    Accepts constructive

    Learn (Own

    when criticized

    constructive

    constructive

    criticisms, addresses

    Learning an

    constructively by

    criticisms but does

    criticisms and does

    shortcomings pointed

    Student Learning)

    peers/supervisors

    not do something to

    something to

    out and monitors own

     

     

    improve oneself

    improve oneself

    progress in the light

     

     

     

     

    of those criticisms

     

     

     

    N=10

    N=7

     

    Does not show any effort to improve instructional

    Confer with peers and supervisors and carries out their

    Make plans of action to improve student learning,

    Read books, makes use of information from the internet,

     

    practices to

    suggestions to

    discusses them with

    discusses with peers

    improve student

    improve student

    supervisors and

    and supervisors ways

    learning

    learning

    implements them

    to improve student

     

     

     

    learning and carries

     

     

     

    them out in

     

     

     

    instruction

     

     

    N=9

    N=8

     

    Conceptual Element/Category

     

    Performance Levels

    Unsatisfactory

    Basic

    Proficient

    Distinguished

     

    Does not use

    Uses appropriate

    Uses appropriate

    Uses appropriate

     

    appropriate verbal

    verbal and non-

    verbal and non-

    verbal and non-verbal

     

    and non-verbal

    verbal language

    verbal language

    language when

     

    language when

    when

    when

    communicating at all

     

    communicating

    communication in

    communicating

    times and encourages

     

     

    class

    during group work

    others (peers and

     

     

     

    and class discussion

    students) to do the

     

     

     

     

    same

     

     

     

    N=9

    N=8

     

    Does not listen

    Listens actively

    Listen actively

    Listen actively when

    EC:

    actively when

    when

    when

    communicating at all

    Willingness to

    communicating

    communicating

    communicating

    times and encourage

    Communicate

     

    during class

    during class and

    others (peers and

    Enthusiastically

     

    discussion

    group discussions

    students) to do the

     

     

     

     

    same

     

     

     

    N=10

    N=7

     

    Loves to talk but

    Loves to

    Loves to

    Loves to

     

    does not waif for

    communicate

    communicate

    communicate

     

    one’s turn.

    appropriately

    appropriately and

    appropriately and

     

     

    (language not

    observes the give-

    observes the give-

     

     

    offensive and waits

    and-take process

    and-take process;

     

     

    for one’s turn)

     

    Maintains composure

     

     

     

     

    at all times

     

     

     

    N=9

    N=8

     

    Conceptual Element/Category

     

    Performance Levels

    Unsatisfactory

    Basic

    Proficient

    Distinguished

     

    Is frequently

    Interacts with

    Interacts with

    Interacts with others

    disrespectful in

    others in polite and

    others in polite and

    in a polite and

    interacting with

    professional

    professional

    professional manner ,

    students, peers,

    manner

    manner and works

    works with them

    teachers, university

     

    with them willingly

    willingly and values

    personnel, and

     

     

    their contributions to

    others

     

     

    any cooperative

     

     

     

    endeavor

     

     

    N=8

    N=9

     

    Shows over bias to

    Makes statements

    Makes statements

    Makes statements

    RD:

    certain groups of

    appreciating

    appreciating diverse

    appreciating diverse

    Sensitivity to

    people/students

    diversity and the

    opinions and using

    opinions and using

    Diversity

    and gives negative

    contributions made

    them to build on

    those opinions to

     

    statements about

    by different groups

    knowledge,

    build on knowledge,

     

    them

     

    expectations, etc.

    expectations, etc;

     

     

     

     

    Actively seeks out

     

     

     

     

    opportunities to draw

     

     

     

     

    out inputs from

     

     

     

     

    diverse groups and

     

     

     

     

    incorporating them in

     

     

     

     

    one’s work or project

     

     

    N=1

    N=8

    N=10

     

    Does not make any

    Makes one or two

    Makes more than

    Makes a lot of

     

    provision for

    provisions to

    two provisions to

    provisions to

     

    accommodating

    accommodate

    accommodate

    accommodate

     

    diversity in group

    diversity in group

    diversity in group

    diversity in group

     

    work or addressing

    work or in the

    work or in the

    work or in the

     

    diversity in the

    classrooms when

    classrooms when

    classrooms when

     

    classrooms when

    doing practicum in

    doing practicum in

    doing practicum in

     

    doing practicum in

    the schools (e.g.

    the schools (e.g.

    the schools in terms

     

    the schools

    differentiated

    addressing learning

    of content and

     

     

    activities for

    style preferences,

    methodology;

     

     

    different ability

    differences, in

    Addresses

     

     

    level)

    abilities, gender

    exceptionalities in

     

     

     

    equity)

    class

     

     

    N=1

    N=10

    N=7

    Recommendation

    1. Update course outlines with the new requirements and formats.
    2. Update tools/rubrics used in the program.
    3. Incorporate INTASC principles in rubrics used for observation.
    4. Design student learning outcomes for development of unit/lesson plans based on the curriculum standards in the methods courses.
    5. Continue to work with state campuses on uniform assessments for AA Teacher Preparation program and TYC in Teacher Preparation.
    6. Establish a capacity within the instructional divisions to share SLO assessment of courses offered in the major requirements of the AA in Teacher Preparation-Elementary degree program.
    7. Design activities for the “Teacher Corp” Program that will complement the programs being offered by the Division.
    8. Increase quantity and quality of teachers produced.
    9. Strengthen admission requirements for the TYC Teacher Preparation program.

     


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