Program Student Learning Outcomes Assessment (AY 2011-2012)

A. Program Goals

  • Students know the basic concepts of Micronesian history, society, government & politics, economy and culture.
  • Students understand the major theoretical approaches that explains political, economical, governmental, social, and cultural phenomenon of the Micronesian islands and other entities.
  • Students can write a critical paper about Micronesian issues using interpreted data collected through research.
  • Students have effective interpersonal skills in collecting and communicating course content of Micronesian studies.
  • Students value and respect their roles as citizens.

B. Program History

The Micronesian Studies A.A. Degree Program was established in 1999 and had its first graduates in 2001. Since then, the program has had an increase in enrollment per semester and has ranked third in most enrolled Associate Degree at the College. From spring 2009 to summer 2011, a total of 66 students have completed their AA in Micronesian Studies.

C. Program description.

This program is designed to give students an in-depth knowledge and understanding of Micronesian history, society, government & politics, economy and culture. The A.A. degree prepares students to work in national or state government and politics, to be an elementary or high school social studies teacher, and in general to be more informed citizens of their state and nation. The program also has proven transferability to a wide range of majors at four-year colleges in the Pacific and the U.S. mainland.

D. Program admission requirements

As per college policy for admission to associate of arts programs.

E. Program courses and enrollment.

  • In addition to the standard General Education Core Requirements, Micronesian Studies
    Majors must take the following courses
    • SS101 Introduction to Political Science
    • SS120 Introduction to Geography
    • SS125 Geography of the Pacific Islands
    • SS195 Micronesian Cultural Studies
    • SS200 Research Methods
    • SS205 Micronesian Government & Politics
    • SS212 Economy of Micronesia
    • SS220 Contemporary Issues in Micronesia
    • SS280 Directed Studies
      • 2 open electives (100 level)
  • These courses also support other Associate Degree programs.
  • Course enrollment.
    • Enrollment data includes courses that are taken by students in other majors and reflects only National campus enrollment. Though SS150 is a general education requirement, it is the perquisite for all of the Micronesian Studies Courses above 200 levels thus is important to include with major requirements. SS120, SS125 and SS195 are offered as electives for other degree programs.

I. Courses Spring 2009 Summer 2009 Fall 2009 Spring 2010 Summer 2010 Fall 2010 Spring 2011 Sum 2011 Total
SS101 Intro. to Political Science 29 n/a 30 30 28 60 30 29 236
SS120 Intro. to Geography 56 29 53 56 50 56 56 83 439
SS125 Geography of the Pacific Is. 29 n/a 21 29 25 30 27 n/a 161
SS150 History of Micronesia 77 60 98 90 27 160 53 27 592
SS195 Micronesian Cultural Studies 26 n/a 26 58 30 30 56 n/a 226
SS200 Research Methods n/a 29 18 n/a 21 23 18 n/a 109
SS205 Micronesian Gov't and Politics 25 n/a 25 24 n/a 29 n/a 24 127
SS212 Economy of Micronesia 28 n/a 25 28 n/a 27 29 n/a 137
SS220 Contem. Issues in Micro 29 n/a 29 19 n/a 29 4 26 136
SS280 Directed Studies 12 n/a 16 14 1 18 18 n/a 79
Total Enrollment 311 118 341 348 182 462 291 189 2242

F. Program Faculty

  • Mariana Ben Dereas, Full-time Professor, BA Political Science (University of Hawaii at Hilo) and MA Pacific Islands Studies Program (University of Hawaii at Manoa)
  • Lucia Donre-Sam, Full-time Instructor (began Spring 2011), BA Sociology (University of Hawaii at Hilo) and Masters in Educational Leadership (San Diego State University)
  • Delihna Manuel Ehmes, Full-time Associate Professor, BS Psychology (Missouri Southern State University) and MS Psychology (Cabella University)
  • John Richard Haglelgam, Full-time Regent Professor, BA Political Science (University of Hawaii at Manoa), MA Political Science (University of Hawaii at Manoa), Masters in Public Administration and Masters in Public Policy (Harvard University)
  • Faustino Yarofaisug, Full-time Associate Professor, BA Geography and Economics (University of South Pacific) and Masters in Educational Leadership (San Diego State University)

G. Program outcome Analysis

This section provides a concise analysis of the program health indicators data and assesses the extent to which the established outcomes have been achieved (evidence). This is the most important part of the program evaluation. The health indicators data that will be collected and evaluated are the following:

  • Program Enrollment-
    Table 2
    Spring 2009 Sum 2009 Fall 2009 Spring 2010 Sum 2010 Fall 2010 Spring 2011 Sum 2011 Total
    78 64 99 88 91 113 121 108 762
  • Graduation Rate-The number of students indicated in this data is taken from the commencement program. This graduation rate does not have data for cohort and persistence rate.
    Table 3
      Fall/Spring Semester
    Semester Enrollment Graduates Graduates %
    Spring2009 78 5 6%
    Summer2009 64 1 2%
    Fall2009 99 16 16%
    Spring2010 88 7 8%
    Summer2010 91 3 3%
    Fall2010 113 11 10%
    Spring2011 121 15 12%
    Summer2011 108 8 7%

  • Average Class Size-Number indicated in data are for National Campus courses only. Average student per section spring 2009 to summer 2011 as indicated in table 1.
    Table 4
    I. Courses Average Class Size
    SS101 Intro. Political Science 30
    SS120 Intro. to Geography 27
    SS125 Geography of the Pacific Is. 27
    SS150 History of Micronesia 31
    SS195 Micronesian Cultural Studies 28
    SS200 Research Methods 22
    SS205 Micronesian Gov't and Politics 25
    SS212 Economy of Micronesia 27
    SS220 Contem. Issues in Micronesia 23
    SS280 Directed Studies 13
    Total Average 27

  • Student's Seat Cost-The cost analysis reflects courses and sections in table 1 using calculation given by IRPO.
    Table 5
    Division Student Seats Credits $ per Credits Seat Cost per Course Total
    Social Science 2242 6,726 $105 $315 $706,230

  • Course Completion- The following course completion rates are the information shared through IRPO.
    Table 6 Fall 2010 course completion rate:
    Subject CourseNum CountOfIdentity ABCP ABCDP ComR-ABCP ComRABCDP
    SS 101 62 42 51 67.7 82.3%
    SS 120 141 95 122 67.4% 86.5%
    SS 125 31 25 26 80.6% 83.9%
    SS 150 295 223 245 75.6% 83.4%
    SS 195 31 28 30 90.3% 96.8%
    SS 195 31 28 30 90.3% 96.8%
    SS 200 24 18 21 75% 87.5%
    SS 205 29 28 28 96.6% 96.6%
    SS 212 28 22 22 78.6% 78.6%
    SS 220 29 24 24 82.8% 82.8%
    SS 280 18 13 16 72.2% 88.9%

    Table 7 Spring 2011 Course completion rate:
    Subject CourseNum CountOf Indentiy ABCP ABCDP ComR-ABCP ComR-ABCDP
    SS 101 31 24 28 77.4% 90.3%
    SS 120 58 52 56 89.7% 96.6%
    SS 125 29 26 27 89.7% 93.1%
    SS 150 84 51 56 60.7% 66.7%
    SS 195 59 43 49 72.9% 83.1%
    SS 200 20 12 17 60.0% 85.0%
    SS 205 Not Offered
    SS 212 30 25 26 83.3% 86.7%
    SS 220 4 4 4 100% 100%
    SS 280 18 17 18 94.4% 100%

    Table 8Summer 2011 Course Completion rate:
    Subject CourseNum CountOfIdentity ABCP ABCDP ComR-ABCP COMR-ABCDP
    SS 101 29 25 27 86.2% 93.1%
    SS 120 83 63 70 75.9% 84.3%
    SS 150 27 22 26 81.5% 96.3%
    SS 220 25 24 24 96% 96%
    SS 205 26 22 23 84.6% 88.5%

  • Student's statisfaction rate.
    • At the end of each semester, the program gives an exit survey. We have, since spring 2010, collected over 30 surveys. In the survey the following are asked:
      1. How effective was the major in preparing you for a career or for transferring?
      2. What were the strongest aspects of the major?
      3. What were the weakest aspects of the major?
      4. Which of the following program learning objectives do you believe you have achieved?
      5. Which, if any, have you not achieved?
      6. What improvements could we make to help students achieve the objectives?
    • From the above questions, it seems that students feel that the major is effective in preparing them for a career or transfer. However, of the student 30 students, only 2 say that they will be looking for a job after graduation. A majority indicate that they will either transfer to a University or go into the Trial Counseling program. One says he/she will go into the 3rd year Business Administration and another to the 3rd year Education Certificate.
    • In regards to number 2 and 3, students feel that the strongest aspect of the major are the courses, however, feel that the weakest aspect is the teaching or the methods of the instructors.
    • For n umbers 4 and 5, a larger percentage say that they achieve the program learning objectives while half say that the objective they feel they did not achieve is number 5.
    • In the last questions, students feel that more field trips are necessary for them to connect to the historical sites and government agencies. They feel that instructors need to improve their teaching skills and grading systems to be more transparent and fair.
  • Employment data - Information given is data collected through personal and email communication by past and present Program Coordinator with program alumni and family members. These numbers indicate first graduates to summer 2011.
    Table 9
    I. Job Description Number
    Elementary Teachers 12
    High School Teacher 2
    Government Offices 6
    Military 4
    State Court 2
    Law Enforcement 1
    Private Sector 6
    Total 33

  • Transfer Data-None provided by IRPO, however, the coordinator of the program and other program faculties have personal contact via email and social network with transferred alumni.
    Table 10
    II. University Number of Students
    University of Hawaii at Hilo 10
    University of Hawaii at Manoa 3
    Chamina University 1
    University of Guam 6
    South Pacific University 1
    Park University 1
    Eastern Oregon 1
    Third Year Education 10
    Trial Counseling Program 16
    Total Transfer 16

  • Program's Learning Outcomes:
    • The following outcomes have been revised and approved since the last Program Review.
    1. Demonstrate the ability to read, speak and write critically and effectively in English about Micronesian Studies Program course content.
    2. Demonstrate proficiency in the geographical, historical, and cultural literacy of the Micronesian region.
    3. Demonstrate proficient knowledge of the structure and functions of the government and social, political, and economic issues concerning the Micronesian Studies course content.
    4. Demonstrate the ability to perform research and write papers relevant to Micronesia using different methods and technologies.
    5. Demonstrate an appreciation of the requirements of good citizenship in the FSM.
  • Students' learning outcomes for program courses.
    • Assessment of the student learning outcomes from each of the courses offered during this 2009-2011 period were completed by each faculty member who taught the courses. Course Level assessments are available in the Social Science division and may also be available with the DAP.

H. Recommendations

  1. Using the data from the Assessment Plan Worksheet #2 and #3, the faculty of the social science division are working towards improving the courses with alignment of course level outcomes with Program Level outcomes. For the past two years, the division has been rewriting the core course outlines for this alignment but also include pre-requisites for the 200 level courses. From course level assessments, it is found that students that do not take prescribed pre-requisite tend to struggle more than those that complete the pre-requisite courses. Such courses are SS205 (Micronesian Government and Politics and Contemporary Issues in Micronesia) which used to have only ESL 098 as the prerequisites. Since 2009's, pre-requisites have change to SS101 and there has been a shift in course completion from more than 20% failure in these two classes to less than 15% failure rate. From the course level assessment, there is a conclusion that the 200 level courses need to be writing intensive thus need to have the EN110 and EN120a as prerequisite. The SS division feels that this is necessary for the students to meet the "M" level of the PLO and for the quality of the instruction and learning to continue.
  2. For better tracking of alumni employment and transfer there needs to be a better method of keeping and updating the data. From the current data, one can see that the goal of the program to transfer students into a Bachelor degree or to the work forces such as the government and private sector is being met. However, the data is incomplete and there are many successful graduates contributing to the nation's development. Right now, we have two alumni heading the Youth Leadership offices (National and Kosrae), one working in the FSM Public Auditors office, two that are lead detectives at the State Police level, two working as staff for the Pohnpei State Supreme Court, several teaching Social Studies (in both Elementary and High School level – public and private schools), more than ten have graduated with their Bachelor Degrees in Social Science Fields such as Political Science, Sociology, Anthropology, Psychology and Public Administration and three have completed their Masters. With these, there needs to be a survey to assess if majoring in Micronesian Studies is a factor to their success. A focus on a cohort group to track beginning with their enrollment here at the college and beyond.
  3. To address the issue of student satisfaction: opportunities should be considered for the faculty to develop and enhance teaching techniques. This is to address what students have expressed in the satisfaction survey. Also from tables 1 and 4, one can see that the average class size for the program courses usually pass the recommended 25 students, the reason for this is that many of the courses (aside from SS280) are used for other majors as either required credit or open elective. For these reasons, SS courses are highly in demand and never enough or the Micronesian studies and other majors. The issue is not only not having enough courses per semester but this could also explain why some students fall out of their cohort and graduate one or two semester late. Usually when there are not enough classes, students will go part-time or take courses that are not within their major. With this, consideration should be given to bring back another instructor position so that SS faculty can have minimal credits of 12 to 15 and more time to work on assessments and course outlines. Currently, the average of credit and preps per faculty is 15 credits to 3 preps while many of the other departments do 12 to 15 with 2 preps and the Chair who coordinates another program and does not have secretarial staff teaches an average of 9 credits with 3 preps.

Assessment Plan Worksheet #2
Academic Programs

Academic Program Assessment Period Covered
( ) Formative Assessment Fall 2009 to Spring 2010
(x) Summative Assessment date Submitted

Institutional Mission/Strategic Goal:
Mission: Historically diverse, uniquely Micronesian and globally connected, the College of Micronesia-FSM is a continuously improving and student centered institute of higher education. The college is committed to assisting in the development of the Federated States of Micronesia by providing academic, career and technical educational opportunities for student learning.
Strategic Goal (which strategic goal(s) most support the services being provided): Strategic Goals 1 and 8

Academic Program Mission Statement :
  • Since 1999, the Micronesian Studies Program has been highly committed to preparing Micronesian students to become better-informed citizens by nurturing and enhancing their lifelong skills and understanding about their history, geography, government and politics, culture, and economy. In so doing, students will develop their personal values and become active participants and contributors to their societies.

Academic Program Goals (General Statements about knowledge, skills, attitudes, and values expected in graduates).
  • Students know the basic concepts of Micronesian history, society, government & politics, economy and culture.
  • Students understand the major theoretical approaches that explains political, economical, governmental, social, and cultural phenomenon of the Micronesian islands and other entities.
  • Students can write a critical paper about Micronesian issues using interpreted data collected through research.
  • Students have effective interpersonal skills in collecting and communicating course content of Micronesian studies.
  • Students value and respect their roles as citizens.

Academic Program Outcomes:
  1. Demonstrate the ability to read, speak and write critically and effectively in English about Micronesian Studies Program course content.
  2. Demonstrate proficiency in the geographical, historical, and cultural literacy of the Micronesian region.
  3. Demonstrate proficient knowledge of the structure and functions of the government and social, political, and economic issues concerning the Micronesian Studies course content.
  4. Demonstrate the ability to perform research and write papers relevant to Micronesia using different methods and technologies.
  5. Demonstrate an appreciation of the requirements of good citizenship in the FSM.


Timeline:For question number 1, it will be an ongoing process. Question number 2 analysis of data and recommendations will be submitted by end of fall 2009 and recommendations will be acted on spring 2010 with progress report submitted end of spring 2010.


Evaulation Questions Data Sources Sampling Analysis
1. Do the major course requirements in Micronesian Studies Program support the 5 program learning outcomes? Course Outlines Review all of the course outlines in the program. Comparison of the course student learning objectives to the Program learning objectives.
2. Do students transfer basic introductory concepts to higher-level courses in Micronesian Studies to be able to achieve PLO 2 and 3?

A quiz of 10 multiple choices along with one short answer will be given to students in SS205, SS212, SS220 and a short writing essay will be given in SS200.
Questions created in higher-level courses reflecting concepts learned in introductory courses.
SS205 quiz will have questions from SS101 while SS212, SS220 will have questions from SS150, and since EN120a is the prerequisite of SS200, a Micronesian content short essay question will be given instead of multiple choices.
Students in 200 level courses. Compare the samples to assess whether students are transferring basic introductory concepts to the 200 level courses to better understand and thus demonstrate proficiency in the course contents.
Activity Who is Responsible? Date
1. All questions should be analyzed and reported with recommendations by end of Fall 2009. All Social Science faculties will work together in gathering data.
Chair and Coordinator of the program will compile final report.
End of December 2009.
2. Recommendations will be enforced during Spring 2010. Social Science faculty teaching course recommendation made for. End of Spring 2010.

Comments:

Assessment Report Worksheet#3

Micronesian Studies Program Fall 2009 to Spring 2010
Unit/Office/Program (3-1) Assessment Period Covered
( ) Formative Assessment (3-3) SS Division Fall 2009 to Sp10
( ) Summative Assessment (3-4) Submitted by & Date Submitted (3-5)
Endorsed by: (3-5a)
Evaluation Question (Use a different form for each evaluation question)(3-6):
Do the major course requirements in Micronesian Studies Program support the 5 program learning outcomes?
First Means of Assessment for Evaluation Question Identified Above (from your approved assessment plan 3-7):
1a. Means of Unit Assessment & Criteria for Success (3-8):
Do the major course requirements in Micronesian Studies Program support the current program learning outcomes?
1b. Summary of Assessment Data Collected (3-9):
Since the 2008 Program Review there was a recommendation to consolidate the 10 PLO to 5. In fall 2009, the program PLO was reintroduced and changes were accepted by the curriculum committee. From assessing the new PLO with all core courses; all course level SLO are align to PLO.
1c: Use of Results to Improve Program/Unit Impact/Services [Closing the loop]:
PLO were rewritten and approved by curriculum. PLO matrix maps out the core courses that meet the three level -- I = introduced, D= developed and practiced with feedback, M= demonstrate at the mastery level appropriate for graduation.
Evaluation Question (Use a different form for each evaluation question)(3-6):
Do students transfer basic introductory concepts to higher-level courses in Micronesian Studies to be able to achieve PLO 2 and 3?
2a. Means of Unit Assessment & Criteria for Success:
For PLO#2 – Pretest and Posttest given in 205 and SS220
2b. Summary of Assessment Data Collected:
Data incomplete because posttest was not given at the end of fall 2009.
2c: Use of Results to Improve Program/Unit Impact/Services [Closing the loop]: Instructors are new at using and analyzing pretest/posttest. This assessment plan will be carried over to fall 2010 where the chair will ensure that pretest and posttest are given in indicated courses and analyzed at the end of each semester to be reported in each of the course level assessment and transferred into worksheet #3. It is also assessed that the current pretest/posttest concentrate more on historical and cultural and lack geographic questions, this will be amended for fall 2010 and spring 2011 pretest/posttest to assess PLO#2.

Third Means of Assessment for Evaluation Question Identified Above (from your approved assessment plan) (3-12):
3a. Means of Unit Assessment & Criteria for Success: For PLO#3 -- Question given in Final Exam of SS220 (essay Format): Does FSM’s status as a Compact of Free Association with the United States contradict its Constitutional Political status as a "Sovereign" Nation? If yes or no, give some examples and a clear discussion of the idea.
3b. Summary of Assessment Data Collected: Out of 25 students that took the Final Exam 22 answered the above question while 3 chose not to answer. Of the 22, 8 received the maximum of 20/20, 5 received 18/20, 6 received 16/20 and 4 received 14/20.

Using the rubric, one can assess that of the 22 students, 8 were superior in their understanding of the content. Those that received 18 lose points not because of content but mostly because of grammar and sentence structure. Of those that received 16 or less, only one received 4 points in the Content category; displaying that students have either superior or average understanding of the relationship between FSM’s sovereignty and its Economic and Political relationship with the United States under the Compact of Free Association agreement.
3c: Use of Results to Improve Program/Unit Impact/Services[Closing the loop]: From assessing the scores and overall performances of the students is that those that scored 8 in the content category and understood the definition and significance of "Sovereignty" and "FSM Compact" were students that have taken SS101 – Introduction to Political Science thus there is a need to reassess the course outline to add SS101 (Introduction to Political Science) as the prerequisite along with SS150 (existing prerequisite). Though many students do well in this class, those that struggle are usually students that have not taken many of the Micronesian Studies courses, especially SS101. I feel that the Micronesian Studies students do well in this course because this is one of the courses we (Social Science academic advisors) advise our Micronesian Studies to take either in their second to the last or last semester of their studies. By the time they take it, they have finished the entire introduction and demonstrate courses to master the content of this course.

Assessment Plan Worksheet #2

Institutional Mission/Strategic Goal:
Mission: Historically diverse, uniquely Micronesian and globally connected, the College of Micronesia-FSM is a continuously improving and student centered institute of higher education. The college is committed to assisting in the development of the Federated States of Micronesia by providing academic, career and technical educational opportunities for student learning.
Strategic Goal (which strategic goal(s) most support the services being provided): Strategic Goals 1: Promote learning and teaching for knowledge, skills, creativity, intellect, and the abilities to seek and analyze information and to communicate effectively Strategic Goals 8: Promote the uniqueness of our community, cultivate respect for individual differences and champion diversity
Academic Program Mission Statement :
  • Since 1999, the Micronesian Studies Program has been highly committed to preparing Micronesian students to become better-informed citizens by nurturing and enhancing their lifelong skills and understanding about their history, geography, government and politics, culture, and economy. In so doing, students will develop their personal values and become active participants and contributors to their societies.
Academic Program Goals (General Statements about knowledge, skills, attitudes, and values expected in graduates).
  • Students know the basic concepts of Micronesian history, society, government & politics, economy and culture.
  • Students understand the major theoretical approaches that explains political, economical, governmental, social, and cultural phenomenon of the Micronesian islands and other entities.
  • Students can write a critical paper about Micronesian issues using interpreted data collected through research.
  • Students have effective interpersonal skills in collecting and communicating course content of Micronesian studies.
  • Students value and respect their roles as citizens.
Micronesian Studies PRogram Outcomes:
  1. Demonstrate the ability to read, speak and write critically and effectively in English about Micronesian Studies Program course content.
  2. Demonstrate proficiency in the geographical, historical, and cultural literacy of the Micronesian region.
  3. Demonstrate proficient knowledge of the structure and functions of the government and social, political, and economic issues concerning the Micronesian Studies course content.
  4. Demonstrate the ability to perform research and write papers relevant to Micronesia using different methods and technologies.
  5. Demonstrate an appreciation of the requirements of good citizenship in the FSM.
Evaluation questions Data Sources Sampling Analysis
1. Do the major course requirements in Micronesian Studies Program support the 5 program learning outcomes? Course Outlines All course outlines of the division are the data source of this assessment study. All SS course outlines will be reviewed and revised to reflect the approved format by the curriculum committee and most importantly is to promote seamless transition from introductory courses to upper division courses. Comparison of the course student learning objectives to the Program learning objectives.
2. Do students transfer basic introductory concepts to higher-level courses in Micronesian Studies to be able to achieve PLO 2 and 3. A quiz of 10 multiple choices along with one short answer will be given to students in SS205, SS220 (use SS150 pre-test with modification) and a writing essay will be given in SS200 and SS212 grading with COMET rubric. Division-based sample test. The division will employ a pre and post test used in the introductory level course to assess whether students enrolled in the upper division courses retain and apply the knowledge and skills expected to learn will be used in upper division courses. SS205 quiz will have questions from SS101 while SS220 will have questions from SS150, and since EN120a is the prerequisite of SS200 and SS212, a Micronesian content short essay question will be given instead of multiple choices. Students enrolled in SS205, SS212, and SS220 are the subjects for this assessment study. Individual student tests will be analyzed (quantitative) and the essay will be analyzed via a content-based rubric.

Timeline: For question number 1, end of fall 2010, all outcomes should be ready for Curriculum Committee review. Question number 2 analyses of data and recommendations will be submitted by end of spring 2011 and recommendations will be submitted in the 2011 program progress report.

Activity Who is Responsible? Date
1. Review of all course outlines in the program align PLO with CLO using matrix. Review and modify courses into the new outline format by the lead instructor of each course. End of Fall 2010.
2a. Pre-test should be administered on the day after the last day of add-drop. A post-test will be given on the last day of class. All Social Science faculties will work together in gathering data. End of May 2011
2b. All questions should be analyzed and reported with recommendations by end both fall 2010 and spring 2011. Chair and Coordinator of the program will compile final report.  

Comments: In our tests, students will be asked to identify what Social Science and English courses have been completed and what their majors are.

Micronesian Studies Program
Unit/Office/Program (3-1)
Unit/Office/Program (3-1)
( ) Summative Assessment (3-4)
Fall 2010 to Spring 2011
Assessment Period Covered
SS Division Fall 2010 to sp11
Submitted by & Date Submitted (3-5)
Endorsed by:(3-3a)

Evaluation Question (Use a different form for each evaluation question)(3-6):
Do the major course requirements in Micronesian Studies Program support the 5 program learning outcomes?

First Means of Assessment for Evaluation Question Identified Above (from your approved assessment plan 3-7):
1a. Means of Unit Assessment & Criteria for Success (3-8): Do the major course requirements in Micronesian Studies Program support the current program learning outcomes?
1b. Summary of Assessment Data Collected (3-9): Core course outlines need to be formatted to new course outline format with Assessment strategies to ensure consistency across campuses in regards to teaching courses. Currently there is nothing in place that ensures consistency of assessment if courses are taught at different campuses.
1c: Use of Results to Improve Program/Unit Impact/Services [Closing the loop]: Course outlines will be updated in fall 2011 with assessment strategies.
Evaluation Question (Use a different form for each evaluation question)(3-6):
Do students transfer basic introductory concepts to higher-level courses in Micronesian Studies to be able to achieve PLO 2 and 3?
2a. Means of Unit Assessment & Criteria for Success:
For PLO#2 – Instead of Pretest and Posttest given in SS220, an essay question was given in both the midterm and final exam, SS205 was excluded because in the PLO matrix SLO do not meet the Mastery “M” level.
2b. Summary of Assessment Data Collected:
Question post in both midterm and final exam -- *In no less than 200 words, discuss the following:
What are the impacts of environmental pollution on our islands of Micronesia and discuss some (at least 3) suggestions to prevent or control pollution on the islands.*
Using a "main idea" rubric scoring of 3 parts (main idea, relevant ideas and organization of ideas – range of 5 in the 3), of the 26 students, 6 scored less than 70% while the rest scored 80% or better on the total rubric. Of the 6 that scored less than 70%, three were not Micronesian Studies students and have not taken SS101, one who scored "0" has never taken both SS150 and SS101 and the other 3 have taken SS101 but final grade for the class where either a low C or D.
2c: Use of Results to Improve Program/Unit Impact/Services [Closing the loop]:
As a collection from last year’s course level assessment of SS220 and this year's assessment, the new course outline will include assessment strategies along with SS101 and SS150 as pre-requisites.

Third Means of Assessment for Evaluation Question Identified Above (from your approved assessment plan) (3-12):
3a. Means of Unit Assessment & Criteria for Success:
For PLO#3 – Course level assessment in SS212 and SS220
3b. Summary of Assessment Data Collected:

SS212 course level assessment: This assessment is both formative and summative. It is formative because Test 5 was a used as an assessment tools to gauge students understanding about the role of culture in influencing development of the state. It is summative because it takes into account all the tests (student’s performance) on the CLO3.

Economy is a broad topic so basic economic concepts and theories were first explore which help established fundamental understanding about later economic topics that relates to Micronesian islands economies. After test 1, the remaining topics (follow by tests) focused on the economic features of Micronesian States with greater emphasis on FSM economy.

CLO 3. (Formative assessment) The result of test 5 which is about the role of culture on economic development is as follow: Twenty-five or 86% of the students passed the test and four students or 14% did not pass the test. Two of the students who failed did not take the test and were later given zeros test score.

(Summative assessment) All tests including the final exams were considered in assessing CLO3 outcome thereby student learning of the course.

Lectures were provided and a movie entitled, "An Up-Side-Down Economy about the unique structure of the FSM economy was shown to students. Before each test, one class session was used as a review period to allow students to ask further questions before they took the test. Overall student learning is as follow: 25 students or (93%) of students successfully passed the class, 2 or (7%) failed, and one student received an Incomplete grade.

Additional observations: I think the students need to take more writing classes and intensive classes in reading comprehension as well as other classes to develop their critical thinking abilities. Critical thinking skill is essential for learning politics. It hones the mind to question and analyze political issues.

Special comments: Grades are awarded based on students' performance on the comprehensive examinations, the essay class works and take-home exams. The bases for evaluating the essays are (1) show of good organization; (2) show of understanding parliamentary and presidential forms of government, the concepts of vote of no-confidence in the parliamentary system, and concepts of separation of power and check and balance; the importance of election as voters’ tool to evaluate the performance of their representatives, as well as other essential topics in politics.

SS220 course level assessment: One of the weekly assignments was for students to write an essay (no less than 300 words) on the topic of “How Western education has influence the social, political, and cultural beliefs in the islands (Micronesia). Also, the question was repeated in the Final Exam (essay Format):
For the essay, a 15 points rubric (main idea) was used, of the 29 students, 25 completed the assignment (scoring from 11 to 15), and 4 did not complete assignment.

In final exam, a 20-point rubric using 3 categories with 3 different scoring was used to score the test (see attachment).

Result: Out of 29 students that took the Final Exam 22 answered the above question while 3 chose not to answer. Of the 22, 8 received the maximum of 20/20, 5 received 18/20, 6 received 16/20 and 4 received 14/20.

Using the rubric, one can assess that of the 22 students, 8 were superior in their understanding of the content. Those that received 18 lose points not because of content but mostly because of grammar and sentence structure. Of those that received 16 or less, only one received 4 points in the Content category; displaying that students have either superior or average understanding of the relationship between Western Education and the political, social and culture of the or their islands.

One observation that was made from looking at the scores and overall performances of the students is that those that scored 8 in the content category and understood the basics of "Western Education" "Economy", "Politics" and "Culture" and how all tie together were students that have taken SS101 – Introduction to Political Science and SS150 – History of Micronesia. SS220 is not an introduction course thus there is an assumption that students have some basic background to the colonial history of the islands along with the political structure thus if a student has not taken these course, he or she might not have the basic ideas and not about to link all together.

3c: Use of Results to Improve Program/Unit Impact/Services[Closing the loop]: Submit course outline following new format with assessment strategies to ensure consistent assessment when same course is taught at different campuses, recommend in the new course outline that EN110 and EN120a be placed as pre-requisites for SS212 and SS101 in addition to SS150 as pre-requisites for SS220.

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