Third Year Certificate in General Business

  • PSLO
  • Data Sheet
  • Program Review
  • Assessment Report

Program Student Learning Outcomes Assessment
(AY 2015-2016)

Program Student Learning Outcomes(PSLOS)

At the completion of the Third Year Certificate in General Business, the student will be able to:

  1. GBU_PSLO_1 Demonstrate an understanding of basic concepts in organizational behavior.
  2. GBU_PSLO_2 Demonstrate an understanding of the intricacies of marketing planning and overall marketing.
  3. GBU_PSLO_3 Demonstrate an understanding of the concepts underlying corporate financial decision making.
  4. GBU_PSLO_4 Demonstrate an understanding of the role of entrepreneurship and small business in the FSM economy.
  5. GBU_PSLO_5 Demonstrate basic knowledge of international business.
  6. GBU_PSLO_6 Demonstrate an understanding of economic development issues.
  7. GBU_PSLO_7 Demonstrate an understanding of statistical methods of sampling and estimating population statistics.

PSLO Assessment Report Summary

What we looked at:

The Third Year Certificate in General Business addressed all 7 PSLOs.

What we found:

  • PSLO1: Organizational behavior
    From the reports uploaded at TracDat on 5/13/2015 (Program Level) and 5/30/2016 (Course Level)
    Assessment Type: Project-Individual
    Assessment Strategy: Use assessment result of MGT320_CSLO_2.5, MGT320_CSLO_3.4 and MGT320_CSLO_3.6 using a case study that demonstrates an understanding of basic concepts in organizational behavior, which includes leadership, motivation and conflicts within an organization. Target: At least 60% of the students should have met the benchmark based from the rubric used.

    Assessment Summary: Based from the above result, the following can be gleaned: On the average, 19% of the students assessed garnered Capstone, 49% garnered Milestone, 20% gathered Benchmark and 13% garnered below Benchmark. From these, a total of 87% met the Benchmark and higher, so the target was met.

    From Spring2016 Course Level Assessment Report: The instructor who taught this course is from another division. She used a different assessment strategy. The report (uploaded in TracDat) can be summarized as follows: Assessment Type: Project-Individual.

    Assessment Strategy: The instructor will give a Classwork/Assignment to the students and their works will be assessed if they demonstrated an understanding of the meaning, nature, and benefits of organizational behavior through a rubric in MGT320_CSLO_1 Target: At least 60% of the students will obtain at least a SATISFACTORY rating based from the rubric.

    Assessment Summary: 89% (8/9) of the students obtained a least a SATISFACTORY rating.

  • PSLO2: Marketing planning and overall marketing
    From the reports uploaded at TracDat on 5/16/2015 (Program Level) and 3/8/2016 (Course Level). Assessment Type: Project-Individual Assessment Strategy: The instructor will require student an individual project to assess MKT311_CSLO_1. Student will develop a marketing plan (use Part I to assess this CSLO). Target: At least sixty percent (60%) of the students will get a rating of seventy percent (70%) or higher (C to A level) in MKT311_CSLO_1. Assessment Summary: TARGET MET. Seventy nine percent (79%) of the students got a rating of 70% or better.

    From Spring2016 Course Level Assessment Report: Assessment Type: Project-Individual Assessment Strategy: The instructor will use a group project to assess MKT311_CSLO_1. Students will demonstrate full understanding of the intricacies of marketing planning and overall marketing strategy by writing and presenting a marketing plan. Use the result of sections 1-5 of the Marketing Plan. Target: At least seventy percent (70%) of the students will get a rating of at least seventy percent (70%) on the rubric. Assessment Summary: ACHIEVED TARGET. Ten (10) out of ten (10) or one hundred percent (100%) of the students achieved seventy percent (70%) or higher rating in MKT311_CSLO_1.
  • PSLO3: Concepts underlying corporate financial decision making
    From the reports uploaded at TracDat on 12/14/2015 (Program Level) and 5/26/2016 (Course Level). Assessment Type: Exam/Quiz - In Course Assessment Strategy: Use the assessment result of FIN312_CSLO_1.4 to FIN312_CSLO_1.10 using major quizzes to assess GBU_PSLO_3. Student will write an essay that demonstrates the understanding of the concepts underlying corporate financial decision making. Target: At least sixty percent (60%) of the students should get SATISFACTORY or BETTER in the quizzes. Assessment Summary: TARGET MET. Sixty five percent (65%) of the students who took the quiz got a rating of 60% or higher on the quizzes. Out of the 16 students who took the assessment activity, 5 of them got a rating or 60% or higher.

    From Spring2016 Course Level Assessment Report: Assessment Type: Exam/Quiz - In Course

    Assessment Strategy: Use the final exam assessment result of FIN312_CSLO_1 to assess GBU_PSLO_3. The exam will include theoretical and problem solving items to measure the students’ demonstration of understanding of the concepts underlying corporate financial decision-making.
    Target: At least sixty percent (60%) of the students should get "C" or better in the final exam.

    Assessment Summary: ACHIEVED TARGET. Six (6) out of nine (9) or sixty six percent (66%) of the students achieved at least a rating of 70% or higher in the final exam in FIN312_CSLO_1.
  • PSLO4: Role of entrepreneurship and small business in the FSM economy

  • From the reports uploaded at TracDat on 05/19/2015 (Program Level) and 5/30/2016 (Course Level). Assessment Type: Project-Individual Assessment Strategy: Use the assessment result of MGT360_CSLO_2 and MGT360_CSLO_3 using Final Project (Business Plan) to assess GBU_PSLO_4. Students will write and present a business plan that demonstrates an understanding of the role of entrepreneurship and small business in the FSM economy. Target: At least seventy percent (70%) of the students should have met the BENCHMARK based from the rubric used. Assessment Summary: TARGET MET. One hundred percent (100%) of the students got a rating of 70% or higher.
    From Spring2016 Course Level Assessment Report: Assessment Type: Project-Group (by twos) Assessment Strategy: The instructor will use the assessment result of MGT360_CSLO_2 in order to assess GBU_PLO_4. Students will demonstrate their understanding of the role of entrepreneurship/small-business in the FSM economy. Target: At least seventy percent (70%) of the students should achieve at least a SATISFACTORY rating based from the rubrics used to assess MGT_CSLO_2 Assessment Summary: Eighty percent (80%) or eight out of ten (8/10) of the students obtained a least a SATISFACTORY rating on their Business Plan write-ups.

  • PSLO5: International business

  • From the reports uploaded at TracDat on 12/20/2014 (Program Level) and 12/19/2015 (Course Level). Assessment Type: Project-Individual Assessment Strategy: Use the assessment result of MGT350_CSLO_1- MGT350_CSLO_2 using a capstone Final Project to assess GBU_PSLO_5 that demonstrates basic knowledge of international business. Target: At least sixty percent (60%) of the students should meet the BENCHMARK based from the rubric used. Assessment Summary: TARGET MET. Sixty three percent (63%) of the students met at least the benchmark level of performance based from the rubric in GBU_PSLO_5. From Spring2016 Course Level Assessment Report: Assessment Type: Project-Individual.

    Assessment Strategy: The instructor will use the assessment result of MGT350_CSLO_2 to assess GBU_PSLO_5. The student through research and analysis reflected in an individual project write-up, will demonstrate an understanding of international market entry; and issues in management, marketing, finance, and human resource management. Target: At least sixty (60%) of the students should achieve at least a BENCHMARK level based from grading rubric in MGT350_CSLO_2. Assessment Summary: TARGET MET. Eighty percent (80%) (8/10) of the students obtained a least a SATISFACTORY rating on their Business Plan Write-ups

  • PSLO6: Economic development issues

  • From the reports uploaded at TracDat on 12/14/2014 (Program Level) and 12/09/2015 (Course Level). Assessment Type: Project-Individual Assessment Strategy: Use the assessment result of ECO320_CSLO_5 using individual project to assess GBU_PSLO_6. Student will develop a self-designed economic policy that demonstrates an understanding of economic development issues. Target: At least sixty percent (60%) of the students should have met the BENCHMARK based from the rubric used. Assessment Summary: TARGET MET. Seventy six percent (76%) of the students got a score of 100 points or higher on the rubric. Out of the 16 students assessed, 12 of them got a score of 100 points or higher on the rubric.

    From Spring2016 Course Level Assessment Report: Assessment Type: Project-Individual Assessment Strategy: The instructor will use the assessment result of EC320_CSLO_2 to assess GBU_PSLO_6. Student will develop a self-designed economic policy that demonstrates an understanding of economic development issues. Target: At least 70% of the students will get a FAIR rating or higher in EC320_CSLO_2. Assessment Summary: ACHIEVED TARGET. Seven (7) out of nine (9) or seventy-eight percent (78%) of the students met GBU_PSLO_6. Two (2) out of 9 or twenty two percent (22%) of the students did not meet GBU_PSLO_6.

     

  • PSLO7: Statistical methods of sampling and estimating population statistics

  • From the reports uploaded at TracDat on 05/19/2015 (Program Level) and 06/01/2016 (Course Level). Assessment Type: Exam/Quiz - In Course Assessment Strategy: Use the result of multiple-choice type of questions from the Pre Test embedded in the CSLO Quiz as Post Test to assess the demonstration of an understanding of statistical methods of sampling and estimating population statistics. Target: At least sixty percent (60%) of the students will get a rating of seventy percent (70%) or higher (C to A level) in BU'MS310_CSLO_1. Assessment Summary: TARGET MET. Fourteen (14) out of twenty-three (23) or sixty one percent (61%) of the students achieved at least a PASSING rating in GBU_PSLO_7.

    From Spring2016 Course Level Assessment Report: Assessment Type: Exam/Quiz - In Course Assessment Strategy: The instructor will use the assessment result of BU/MS310_CSLO_1 to assess GBU_PSLO_7. The instructor will use an examination that will consist the following: 1) an essay type question that will require student explain the difference between a population and a sample; 2) an essay type question that will ask student to discuss different methods of sampling and choose the best for an application; 3) a problem-solving type that will ask the student to calculate point estimators of a population from sample data; 4) an identification type question that will require student to determine if a point estimator is unbiased, efficient, or consistent; 5) a problem-solving type that will ask the student to construct interval estimates of a population mean for a large sample and a small sample; and 6) a problem-solving type that will ask the student to determine an appropriate sample size. Averages on each of these exam components will measure the demonstration of understanding of statistical methods of sampling and estimating population statistics. Target: At least sixty percent (60%) of the students on the average should achieve at least a SATISFACTORY rating based from the rubrics in each of the components of BU'MS310_CSLO_1. Assessment Summary: ACHIEVED TARGET. Seventy-eight percent (78%) or fourteen out of eighteen (14/18) of the students obtained at least a SATISFACTORY rating.

What we are planning to work on:

  • PSLO1:Improvement Plan: Although the target was met, it can be seen from the result that percentages in the different categories are low. Also, there was a 13% of students garnering below Benchmark. A consultation period shall be lengthened to give the students a lot of opportunities to improve. Also, the instructor should do early monitoring of their works.
  • PSLO2:Improvement Plan: No improvement plan was determined by the instructor.
  • PSLO3:Improvement Plan: Because most of the examples on the new textbooks use Microsoft Excel, more activities using the computer will be done by the students.
  • PSLO4:Improvement Plan 1: The quality of the write-ups of some components of the Business Plans was not that good. There is a need for the instructor to require the students to turn-in drafts earlier so these can be reviewed and appropriate modifications can be infused before the submission of the final draft.

  • Improvement Plan 2: The target was met but the average is very low (64%). Some components of the business plans were not well written. None of the business plans have an appendix that should contain assumptions, photos and other supporting documents. This was emphasized to the students but maybe due to time constraints, they regarded this as unimportant. Write-ups should have preliminary and final phases so they can still be improved or modified, and to ensure that all components as prescribed will be included.

  • PSLO5:Improvement Plan 1: The target was met but the percentages garnered in specific learning objectives and the percentage of students meeting at least the BENCHMARK was low. The instructor would determine an earlier time for students to start their research so that more quality of the output would be ensured.
  • PSLO6:Improvement Plan: Additional research activities will be given to students. Field trip will also be organized to show students how policies are made in FSM.
  • PSLO7:Improvement Plan 1: Enhance the level of engagement of the students by giving more exercises that will result in the increase of students rating from 50% to 60% and achieve the targeted result.

  • Improvement Plan 2: More exercises should be assigned to the students so their understanding on the concepts and their computing skills will improve.

Recommendations for students:

    • Improve quality of write-ups of Business Plans.
    • Seek consultations with the instructor.

This report is a reflection of the results of all Program Learning Outcomes inputted by instructors in TracDat.

 

Program Data Sheet
Spring 2016

Download PDF Version of the Data Sheet

Enrollment by Major and Campus

Enrollment by Major and Campus Degree Term Chuuk Kosrae National Pohnpei Yap students
General Business TYC Fall 2011     10     10
General Business TYC Fall 2013     7     7
General Business TYC Fall 2014     27     27
General Business TYC Fall 2015     18     18
General Business TYC Spring 2011     8     8
General Business TYC Spring 2012     4     4
General Business TYC Spring 2014     12     12
General Business TYC Spring 2014     12     12
General Business TYC Spring 2015     10     10
General Business TYC Spring 2016     11     11


Credits by Major and Campus

Major Degree Term Chuuk Kosrae National Pohnpei Yap Credits
General Business TYC Fall 2011     90     90
General Business TYC Fall 2013     42     42
General Business TYC Fall 2014     201     201
General Business TYC Fall 2015     111     111
General Business TYC Spring 2011     84     84
General Business TYC Spring 2012     39     39
General Business TYC Spring 2014     102     102
General Business TYC Spring 2014     102     102
General Business TYC Spring 2015     168     168
General Business TYC Spring 2016     138     138


Credits by Program and Campus

Program Term Chuuk Kosrae National Pohnpei Yap Credits
no data              
               
               
               


Credits Enrolled, Attempted and Earned(averages)

Major degree term credEnrollAvg credAttAvg credEarnAvg termGPAAvg
General Business TYC Fall 2011 9.0 9.0 9.0 3.28
General Business TYC Fall 2013 6.0 3.9 3.9 2.68
General Business TYC Fall 2014 10.8 156.0 10.4 3.02
General Business TYC Fall 2015 11.7 11.7 11.7 3.09
General Business TYC Spring 2011 10.5 10.1 10.1 2.89
General Business TYC Spring 2012 9.8 9.8 9.8 3.88
General Business TYC Spring 2014 8.5 8.3 8.3 3.50
General Business TYC Spring 2015 12.5 12.0 10.9 2.43
General Business TYC Spring 2016 12.6 12.6 12.6 3.03


Program Sections, Enrollment Ratio and Average Class Size

Program term section enrollMax enrollment enrollRatio AvgClassSize
General Business (3rd year) Fall 2010 2 50 13 26.0% 6.5
General Business (3rd year) Fall 2011 2 50 19 38.0% 9.5
General Business (3rd year) Fall 2014 3 60 51 85.0% 17.0
General Business (3rd year) Fall 2015 2 50 18 36.0% 9.0
General Business (3rd year) Spring 2011 3 70 20 28.6% 6.7
General Business (3rd year) Spring 2012 3 75 9 12.0% 3.0
General Business (3rd year) Spring 2014 2 40 29 72.5% 14.5
General Business (3rd year) Spring 2015 3 60 32 53.3% 10.7


Course Completion & Withdrawals (Major)

Major degree term students ABCorP% ABCDorP% W%
General Business TYC Fall 2011 8 100.0% 100.0% 0.0%
General Business TYC Fall 2013 14 64.3% 64.3% 35.7%
General Business TYC Fall 2014 54 96.3% 96.3% 0.0%
General Business TYC Fall 2015 43 95.3% 100.00% 0.00%
General Business TYC Spring 2011 9 88.9% 88.9% 11.1%
General Business TYC Spring 2012 4 100.0% 100.0% 0.0%
General Business TYC Spring 2014 33 100.0% 100.0% 0.0%
General Business TYC Spring 2015 46 87.0% 93.5% 2.0%
General Business TYC Spring 2016 46 100.0% 100.0% 0.0%


Course Completion & Withdrawals (Program)

Program term students ABCorP% ABCDorP% W%
no data          
           
           
           


Graduates

Major degree AY2010/11 AY2011/12 AY2012/13 AY2013/14 AY2014/15 AY2015/16
General Business TYC 4 4 0 14 14 9
  • Program information is based on Dickeson's concept of a progarm as expending resoruces and is linked to coureses onwed by a "program" from TracDat.
  • Graduation rates are based on Fall new students (full time) cohorts that are tracked at 100%, 150% and 200%.
  • Retention rates are based on Fall new students (full time) cohorts to return the following fall semester.
  • Persistence rates are based on Fall new students (full time) cohrots who return the following spring semester.

Program Review (Pohnpei Campus)

AP Full Official:TYC Business Administration

Vision Statement

The College of Micronesia-FSM will assist the citizens of the Federated States of Micronesia to be well-educated, prosperous, globally-connected, accountable, healthy and able to live in harmony with the environment and the world community.

Mission Statement

Historically diverse, uniquely Micronesian and globally connected, the College of Micronesia-FSM is a continuously improving and student centered institute of higher education. The college is committed to assisting in the development of the Federated States of Micronesia by providing academic, career and technical educational opportunities for student learning.

Our College's Values

  • Learner-centeredness
  • Professional behavior
  • Innovation
  • Honesty and Ethical Behavior
  • Commitment and Hard Work
  • Teamwork
  • Accountability

The College of Micronesia-FSM, through a cycle of assessment and review, will continuously improve to meet or exceed current accreditation standards and will:

  1. Promote learning and teaching for student success and satisfaction.
  2. Provide institutional support to foster student success and satisfaction
  3. Create an adequate, healthy and functional learning and working environment.
  4. Foster effective communication.
  5. Invest in sufficient, qualified, and effective human resources.
  6. Have sufficient and well-managed fiscal resources that allows for financial independence.
  7. Build a partnering and service network for student success, and workforce and economic development.
  8. Promote the uniqueness of our community, cultivate respect for individual differences, and champion diversity.
  9. Provide for continuous improvement of programs, services and college environment.

B. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

Third-Year Business program is offered to provide students with higher level of skills in addition to their Association Degree in Business. It can also serve as a stepping–stone for those students wanting to pursue a higher degree in the business field.

The program is currently offered only at the main National campus and is also articulated with the University of Guam, allowing for smooth transfers from COM_FSM and final year at the university.

C. PROGRAM GOALS:

As stated in the 2007 to 2009 COM-FSM General Catalog, the Program is designed to provide Employers with higher level skills through;

  1. Offering of high level courses
  2. Meeting other general education requirements needed to better articulate the program with fourth-year programs elsewhere

While employers are satisfied with graduates of the associate degree program in business administration, they also want people with higher level skills. As a result, the Division now offers third-year certificate of achievement programs in accounting and in general business. These programs are not only designed to offer higher level courses, but to also meet other general education requirements needed to better articulate the program with fourth year programs elsewhere. .

The third year program is articulated with the University of Guam, so students can transfer smoothly from COM-FSM into the fourth and final year at that university.

D. PROGRAM HISTORY:

The Third-Year Certificate program in business administration was approved for implementation in 2001.

E. PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon completion of the 3rd Year Certificate Program in General Business, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of basic concepts in organizational behavior, including things such as personality, individual differences, motivation, leadership, conflict, communication, group dynamics, power and politics, change, organizational structure, design and culture and cultural diversity by explaining how these concepts relate to performance and job satisfaction in the organization
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the intricacies of marketing planning and overall marketing strategy; the sequential nature of marketing and the importance of monitoring mechanisms; and the scope of comprehensive marketing in light of current technological developments.
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of the concepts underlying corporate financial decision-making – such as capital structure, capital budgeting, short-term asset management, dividend policy, financial analysis, corporate restructuring – and how these decisions affect other areas of the firm.


  4. Demonstrate an understanding of the role of entrepreneurship and small business in the (FSM) economy and show competence in basic business planning and in identifying opportunities and challenges that entrepreneurs and small business owners/managers face – both in FSM and in general – in trying to achieve their business objectives.


  5. Demonstrate basic knowledge of international business by discussing its importance and explaining its theoretical foundations. The student will also be expected to describe the international economic and financial environment; the role of government, culture, politics and laws in international business; and analyze issues in management, marketing, finance, human resources, accounting and taxation.


  6. Demonstrate an understanding of economic development issues faced by least developed countries (LDCs) and options for development. Such issues will include, among others, foreign aid to LDCs, unemployment, urbanization and population growth, all with special emphasis on FSM.
  7. Demonstrate an understanding of statistical methods of sampling and estimating population statistics and competence in using computer software to calculate point estimates and confidence intervals and use statistical methods to test hypotheses, recognize trends and make forecasts to support decisions in the business/economics environment
    • Aligning Program Components with Learning Objectives

      Contents of the PLO are divided into 3 categories; (I) Introduced, (D) Demonstrated and practiced with feedback and (M) demonstrated at the mastery level appropriate for graduation.

Courses PLO#1 PLO#2 PLO#3 PLO#4 PLO#5 PLO#6 PLO#7
BU/MS310             M
ECO 320           M  
FIN 312     M        
MGT 320 M            
MGT 350         M    
MGT 360       M      
MKT 311   M          

This MATRIX is a common tool used to summarize the relationship between program components (curriculum, courses) and program goals and objectives.

F. PROGRAM STRUCTURE

To be admitted into the third-year programs, applicants are usually required to have n associate degree in business administration and a GPA of at least 2.5. Applicants who are admitted with an associate degree in a different major must complete business requirements for the associate degree program during their third-year certificate course of study. In most
of the cases, such students might have to first complete those 100- and 200-level business courses as most of them are prerequisites for the 300-level third-year courses

I. General Education Core Requirements - 9 credits
II. Major Business Requirements -21 credits

Hence, Graduation Requirements – 30 credits

Three (3) General Education courses chosen from the following areas:

Students may choose one course from each area or two courses from one area and one course from another area

  • Quantitative and Logical Reasoning (3)
  • World Cultures and History (3);
  • Humanities (3)

a. Major Business Requirements -21 Credits

  • BU/MS 310 Applied Statistics (3)
  • ECO 320 Economic Development (3)
  • FIN 312 Corporate Finance (3)
  • MGT 320 Organizational Behavior (3)
  • MGT 350 International Business (3)
  • MGT 360 Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management (3)
  • MKT 311 Marketing Strategy (3)

Suggested Schedule

First Semester (FALL)

Course No. of Credits
MGT 320 Organizational Behavior 3
MGT 350 International Business 3
ECO 320 Economic Development 3
Q & L R/WC & H/Humanities course 3
Q & L R/WC & H/Humanities course..... 3
   
Total Credits 15

Second Semester(SPRING)

Course No. of Credits
FIN 312 Corporate Finance 3
MKT 311 Marketing Strategy 3
MGT 360 Entrepreneurship/Small Bus 3
BU/MS 310 Applied Statistics. 3
Q & L R/WC & H/Humanities course 3
   
Total Credits 15

G. PROGRAM ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS:

In order to be admitted to the Third-Year General Business program, applicants are required to have achieved the followings:

  1. An Associate Degree in Business Administration
  2. A GPA of at least 2.5
  3. Minimum grade of C in Business Administration A.S major courses

For those applicants with Associate Degree of different majors, they must complete business requirements for the Associate Degree program during their Third-Year Certificate course of study. This would mean completing those 100- and 200- level business courses as they are prerequisites for the 300-level third-year courses.

In addition to the standard General Education Core Requirements, students majoring in general business must take the following required courses.

Course Number Course Title Course Description
BU/MS 310 Applied Statistics Builds on the fundamental concepts developed in the introductory statistics course. Students make point estimates of population parameters, construct confidence intervals for sample statistics, perform hypothesis testing to support decisions, make inferences about populations from sample data, use samples to make inferences about the general population, and use linear regression to recognize trends and make forecasts. Students use a computer software package (e.g. MS Excel) for both data analysis and presentation Prerequisite: MS 150
EC 320 Economic Development Explores the characteristics of underdeveloped economies, theories of economic growth, and strategies for economic development. Special emphasis is given to the Micronesia and Pacific region. Prerequisite: EC 230 or permission of Business Division
FIN 312 Corporate Finance Builds on the principles course, further developing tools to help the potential manager analyze and solve financial problems in business organizations. Topics include capital structure, diversification, dividend policy, short-term financial (cash, receivables, inventory) management, corporate restructuring (mergers, acquisitions, takeovers, IPOs) and some aspects of international finance. Prerequisite: BU 250, MS 150
MGT 320 Organizational Behavior Covers the human relations movement; basic concepts in behavior pertaining to organizations including personality, motivation, leadership, communication, change, conflict, and group dynamics. Course includes the relationship of these concepts to performance, job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Prerequisite: BU 260
MGT 350 International Business Examines the theoretical foundations of international trade and investment; the role of government in international business; cultural, political and legal issues; the international economic and financial environment; and issues in management, marketing, finance, and human resource management, with a brief overview of international accounting and taxation. U.S. and FSM business perspectives are given special emphasis.Prerequisite: BU 260 and EC 220 or EC 230
MGT 360 Entrepreneurship & Small Business Enables students to develop an understanding of entrepreneurship and small business management by studying entrepreneurial strategies, how to identify and pursue new venture opportunities, and how to develop business plans. Stu- dents also study the FSM environment and how it directly or indirectly influences entrepreneurship and the establishment and growth of small businesses. Prerequisite: BU250, BU 260 & BU270 OR permission of Business Division
MKT 311 Marketing Strategy Builds on the marketing concepts covered in the principles course. The course focuses on procedures for planning and developing the analysis and solutions to common marketing strategy problems involving the marketing mix – pricing, distribution, product development and promotion. Prerequisite: BU 270

H. PROGRAM FACULTY:

a. Full-time Instructors as of Fall 2011:

Marian Medalla, Full-time Assistant Professor; Bachelor of Science in Accountancy (Mindanao State University, Philippines); Certified Public Accountant (Philippine Board of Accountancy, since 2001); Master in Business Administration (Notre Dame of Dadiangas College, Philippines).


RUCI YAUVOLI, Full-time Instructor; Bachelor of Arts in Business (University of the South Pacific); Diploma in Credit Analysis (New York University); Master in Business Administration (University of the South Pacific).



ALEILI DUMO, Full-time Instructor, Bachelor in Business Administration major in Accounting (Philippine Christian University, Philippines); Master in Business Administration (Philippine Christian University, Philippines).




b. Part-time Instructors as of Fall 2011:

George Mangonon, Full-time Assistant Professor / Chair of Math and Science Division - Pohnpei Campus; Bachelor of Science in Mathematics (University of the Philippines); Master in Business Administration (Virgen Milagrosa University, Philippines


I. PROGRAM OUTCOME ANALYSIS

This section discusses enrollment data and observed trends on the class average, graduation rates, completion rates, transfer and employment rates. The last analysis was carried out in 2009, however, this discussion is based on the last four years, from 2008-2011.

a. Program Enrollment

Table 1: Total number of students enrolled at COM-FSM, National campus for Third-Year Business Program (Spring 2008 – Spring 2011)

Program Spring 2008 Summer 2008 Fall 2008 Spring 2009 Summer 2009 Fall 2009 Spring 2010 Summer 2010 Fall 2010 Spring 2011
Third Year Certificate in General Business 41 - 27 31 - 21 65 - 21 28

Based on the data in Table 1 as well as the bar graph above, the Third Year Certificate in Business experienced a fluctuating trend in its enrollment during the last four years.

Over the four years, enrollment in this program peaked in the Spring of 2010 with a total of 65 students, due mainly to the increase in enrollment on Applied Statistics (BU/MS310). This particular course is a core course for both Third Year Business and Accounting. Over the remainder of the four years, the number seemed to fluctuate, still with the highest noted during Spring semesters. The lowest number was in Fall 2009 and 2010, when enrollment bottomed out at 21 students.

Table 2.1 - Total number of students enrolled at COM-FSM, National campus for Third-Year courses (Spring 2008 - Spring 2011)

PROGRAM COURSES AND ENROLLMENT
Spring (2008-2011)
Course Spring 2008 Spring 2009 Change Percent Spring 2010 Change Percent Spring 2011 Change Percent
BU/MS 310 16 14 (2) -13% 22 8 57% 8 (14) -64%
Fin 312 8 6 (2) -25% 15 9 150% 6 (9) -60%
MGT 360 8 6 (2) -25% 14 8 133% 7 (7) -50%
MKT311 9 5 (2) -25% 14 8 133% 7 (7) -50%
PROGRAM COURSES AND ENROLLMENT
Fall (2008-2010)
Course Fall 2008 Fall 2009 Change Percent Fall 2010 Change Percent
ECO 320 8 7 (1) -13% 8 1 14%
MGT 320 10 8 (2) -20% 6 (2) -25%
MGT 350 9 6 (3) -33% 7 1 17%

*source:based on Instructor's grading sheet

It should be noted that third year courses are not offered during the summer semesters, hence, enrollment is recorded as zero in this semester every year. As indicated in tables 2.1 and 2.2 above, the number of enrollees for all third year business courses during the Spring ranged from 6 to 22 students, while Fall enrollment reflected smaller number between 6 to10 student. However, the average still stands between 8 and 9 students (refer to Table 4).

Comparatively between year to year, the percentage changes reflected a declining trend in enrolments for the Third Year Business core courses, with the exception to Economic Development and International Business, where a rise in enrollment during the Fall of 2010 was observed.

The above graph depicts the highest number of enrollees during the 2010 Spring semester. Data showed a total of 22 students enrolled in Applied Statistics, 15 in Corporate Finance and 14 each for Entrepreneurship and Marketing Strategy.

b. Graduation Rate

Period Fall Spring Summer Total
2008 0 3 0 3
2009 0 3 0 3
2010 4 no data no data no data

Due to incomplete data, it was quite difficult to analyze and predict the graduation trend for the Third Year Business program in the last 4 years. However, a total of 3 students graduated in 2008 and 2009 respectively, with a slight improvement in 2010 by one more student, pushing up the total of graduates to 4.

Course Title Average Class Size(Spring) Average Class Size(Fall)
BU/MS 310 Business Statistic 15 -
ECO 320 Economic Development - 8
FIN 312 Corporate Finance 9 -
MGT 320 Organizational Behavior - 8
MGT 350 International Business - 7
MGT360 Entrepre/Small Business 9 -
MKT311 Marketing Strategy 9 -

*source: based on Instructor's grading sheet

Table 4 represents the average class size for each Third Year courses and figures were calculated using the enrollment data from Table 1, based on the Spring and Fall semesters in the last 4 years. The maximum intake, however, remains at 25 students for every semesters.

d. Seat Costs

AVERAGE STUDENT SEAT COST Fall 2010-Summer 2011
Business Division Courses Total Classes for the Year, with 4-credit Courses as 2 Sections Ratio to Total Classes for the Academic Year Proportion to Total Business Division Budget ($238,312.00), Based on Ratio to Total Classes Offered for the Period
AC 131 10 13%  
AC 220 6 8%
AC 250 2 3%
AC 320 1 1%
AC 321 1 1%
AC 325 1 1%
AC 330 1 1%
AC 335 1 1%
AC 370 1 1%
BU 250 2 3%
BU 260 4 5%
BU 270 3 4%
BU 271 2 3%
BU/MS 110 2 3%
BU/MS 310 1 1% $3,094.96
CA 105 2 3%
EC 220 3 4%
EC 230 3 4%
EC 320 1 1% $3,094.96
FIN 312 1 1% $3,094.96
IS 201 4 5%
IS 220 2 3%
IS 230 3 4%
IS 240 3 4%
IS 260 2 3%
IS 270 1 1%
IS 280 1 1%
MGT 320 1 1% 3,094.96
MGT 350 1 1% 3,094.96
MGT 311 1 1% 3,094.96
Total Number of Classes 77 100%

Total Budget for the Program $18,569.77
Divided by Program's Student Population in All TYC General Business Classes
  BU/MS 310 8  
ECO 320 8
FIN 312 6
MGT 320 6
MGT 350 7
MGT360 7
MKT 311 7
Total Program's Student   49
SEAT COST $378.97

* figure derived from the COM website
** This include Fall 2010, Spring and Summer 2011

The average student seat cost was calculated based on the 2011 budget allocation and using the total enrollment for the Fall semester 0f 2010 , including Spring and Summer of 2011.

e. Completion/Sucess Rate (Pass/Fail)

Program Spring 2008 Summer 2008 Fall 2008 Spring 2009 Summer Fall 2009 Spring 2010 Summer 2010 Fall 2010 Spring 2011
BU/MS 310 Pass 100%
Failure 0
Pass 85%
Failure 15%
Pass 100%
Failure 0
Pass 100%
Failure 0
ECO 320 Pass 88%
Failure 12
Pass 100%
Failure 0
Pass 75%
Failure 25%
FIN 312 Pass 100%
Failure 0
Pass 75%
Failure 25%
Pass 91%
Failure 9
Pass 100%
Failure 0
MGT 320 Pass 80%
Failure 20
Pass 100%
Failure 0
Pass 83%
Failure 17%
MGT 350 Pass 78%
Failure 22%
Pass 100%
Failure 0
Pass 86%
Failure 14%
MGT 360 Pass 71%
Failure 29%
Pass 100%
Failure 0%
Pass 85%
Failure 15%
Pass 100%
Failure 0
MKT 311 Pass 100%
Failure 0%
Pass 100%
Failure 0%
Pass 100%
Failure 0%
Pass 100%
Failure 0

The above table tries to reflect the success rates of students who complete the Third Year Business courses in the last four years. Notably, the passing rates looked very encouraging with the achievement of 100 percent in nearly all courses, at most semesters. Failure rates, however were very low, representing only one to two students per semester that didn’t make it.

COURSE COMPLETION RATE
Spring (2008-2011)
Course Spring 2008 Spring 2009 Change Spring 2010 Change Spring 2011 Change
BU/MS 310 Pass
Failure
100%
0%
85%
15%
-15%
15%
100%
0%
15%
-15%
100%
0%
0%
0%
FIN 312 Pass
Failure
100%
OBU%
75%
25%
-25%
25%
91%
9%
16%
-16%
100%
0%
9%
-9%
MGT 360 Pass
Failure
71%
29%
100%
0%
29%
-29%
85%
15%
-15%
15%
100%
0%
15%
-15%
MKT 311 Pass
Failure
100
0%
100%
0%
0%
0%
100%
0%
0%
0%
100%
0%
0%
0%

COURSE COMPLETION RATE
Fall(2008-2010)
Course Fall 2008 Fall 2009 Change Fall 2010 Change
ECO 320 Pass
Failure
88%
12%
100%
0%
12%
-12%
75%
25%
12%
25%
MGT 320 Pass
Failure
80%
20%
100%
0%
20%
-20%
83%
17%
-17%
17%
MGT 350 Pass
Failure
78%
22%
100%
0%
22%
-22%
86%
14%
-14%
14%

According to the above tables, average course success rates differed significantly. A rational justification can be that students without clearly defined goals, or who had goals that indicated they were not academically ready for college level work, had lower course success rates as compared with other students. Students who had a goal of transferring to higher academic institutions like University of Guam and University of Hawaii generally try their best to gain higher grades , thus might be included with those with the highest course success rates.

Spring 2008 Summer 2008 Fall 2008 Spring 2009 Summer 2009 Fall 2009 Spring 2010 Summer 2010 Fall 2010 Spring 2011
BU/MS 310 A=4     A=4     A=4     A=2
B=7     B=6     B=14     B=4
C=3     C=1     W=4     C=1
W=2     F=2           W=1
      W=1            
ECO 320     A=1     A=2     B=5  
    B=5     B=4     C=1  
    C=1     C=1     F=2  
    F=1              
FIN 312 A=5     B=1     B=4     B=5
B=2     C=2     C=6     C=1
W=1     D=1     D=1      
      W=2     W=4      
MGT 320     A=2     A=1     A=3  
    B=4     B=7     B=2  
    C=2           F=1  
    D=1              
    F=1              
MGT 350     A=2     A=1     A=1  
    B=3     B=5     B=5  
    C=2              
    D=1              
    F=1              
MGT 360 A=1     A=1     A=2     B=5
B=1     B=3     B=7     C=2
C=3     C=1     C=2      
D=2     W=1     F=2      
W=1           W=1      
MKT 311 A=4     A=1     A=4     B=5
B=4     B=3     B=6     C=2
W=1     W=1     C=3      
            W=1      

Tabulated above are the various grades that were used to designate different levels of students’ achievement and performances. Marks were derived from quizzes, assignments, group projects and presentations, case analysis, mid-term and final exams. These are then converted into the above grades, providing a summary of the students’ accomplishments for each semester.

Results indicated a concentration of students achieving B grade in all the courses, followed by A grade and only few students fall under the C grade category. An average of only 1 student achieved a D grade in every semester.

f. Employment Rate

Analysis cannot be undertaken due to unavailability of data

g. Transfer Data

Analysis cannot be undertaken due to unavailability of data

J. FINDINGS AND RECOMMNEDATIONS:

(1) ENROLLMENT

Finding

As demonstrated in the Program Outcome analysis, the enrollment trend for the Third Year Business program kept fluctuating through out the last four years. This is an improvement when compared to the results of the previous program review where a decreasing trend was observed. The fluctuation in the enrollment numbers As highlighted in the previous review, low enrollment automatically has negative impacts on the viability and continuity of any academic program. This is evidenced with the current shelving of the Third Year Business and Accounting programs.

Recommendation:

Increase Enrollment through Marketing- existing Third Year Business program and its curriculum should be marketed widely to graduating students, working personnel as well as business owners. Business division should develop an aggressively recruiting program by:

a) Assigning each member of the division to specific areas of recruitment such as; local states, organizations, and targeted students

b) Business division to host awareness meetings on campus, organize seminar, symposium to recruit potential students and at the same time, developing some sense of community among the business majors

c) Often students do not get necessary information in time due to lack of academic and supporting staff and their necessary services. Furthermore, many students enter the College with no idea of what they want to study, indicating the lack of direction by the College community. Conducting information sessions at the beginning of every semester can be the best way of keeping students and prospect ones informed. Business Division can produce or arrange for leaflets with the up to date content of the various program offerings and faculty members to be more active in promoting these programs. COM should emphasize the importance of not only improved counseling, but also the role of faculty to recruit students into their programs.

d) Advertise the Third Year Business program in the working population specifically government sector. Conduct a survey in the government offices to determine number of students that are interested in enrolling the Third Year Business, and the specific courses they need in order to graduate. Based on the result of the survey and if the number of students is significant enough, COM can either: offer those courses after office hours, regardless of the venue, or hold classes at the national government office in Palikir at a time convenient to the prospect students.

(I1) UNAVAILABLE AND INCOMPLETE DATA

Findings

Data on graduation, employment and transfer rates were either incomplete or not available for the last four years. This can further lead to making decisions based on guesswork, not facts. Many opportunities can also be missed without proper data and analysis.

Similar problem was encountered in 2009 during the previous review where the overall exercise was curtailed by either lack of data or inaccuracy resulting in subjective analysis and findings.

Recommendation:
a) Quality and accurate analysis can only be achieved if the required data are readily available. The needed data for program review should be posted in the IRPO web site in timely manner. Data presentation should be uniform and consistent to avoid confusion.
b) The decision by the College to shelve the third Year Business and Accounting should be put on hold until a substantial survey and analysis is carried out. Institutional review of academic programs should involve analysis of both quantitative and qualitative data, and COM must demonstrate that they make judgments about the future of academic programs within a culture of evidence.

 

  • Unit Assessment Report

     

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